Close

1969-1971 Yamaha AT1

This is a discussion on 1969-1971 Yamaha AT1 within the Project Builds forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; So where do I begin? Pulling the clutch?...

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 64
  1. #21
    Member ALBA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Ontario California
    Posts
    44
    So where do I begin? Pulling the clutch?
    it's always close by with one in the chamber

  2.  

  3. #22
    Member ALBA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Ontario California
    Posts
    44
    Maybe instead of shit talking we could comunicate productively? So I am asking all the young and old farts on here to help me help myself and learn this motor.
    it's always close by with one in the chamber

  4. #23
    Senior Member dielectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Kenosha, WI, USA.
    Posts
    269
    ALBA, do you go to the grocery store, punch the clerk in the face, then ask him where they keep the milk?

    Regarding ancient engines like that, even my podunk library has a plethora of books on small engine repair, including motorcycles. Info on the internet on this is hard to find, but surprisingly easy in real life.

    #readabook
    Dictated but not read.

  5. #24
    Senior Member Geeto67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    18,456
    Step 1: you get a FACTORY manual for that specific model. Not a chiltons, clymer, or Haynes (although getting either or all of them makes a good secondary reference since the factory manual is liable to be part pidgen english anyway).

    Step 2: you look at the tools secton of that manual and make sure you own most or all of the tools you will need. most of the specality tools can be improvised so don't worry about them - just make sure you have the basics like a metric socket set, impact driver, JIS screwdrivers, a good set of metric allen keys, feeler gauges, etc


    If you want a task to teach you something - remove the pressure plate and then the clutch pack. Get a pane of glass and a feeler gage. lay each individual plate and steel on the glass one at a time and use the feeler gage to look for warpage. also inspect the backside looking at the plate through the glass (a small smear of oil helps) to see if there is any spot where it isn't in contact. what will this tell you? how badly the engine was abused. if every steel is warped and every fiber glazed over then chances are you are going to need to have a hard look at the transmission in the bike, esp the shift forks and engagement dogs. if not, just a good once over will do.
    And then you go, "Well, my brother can jump over, like, 10 garbage cans." and then I'll say something cool like, "if I can keep the front wheel from bursting into flames," okay? and don't forget to call me "THE HANKINATOR."

  6. #25
    Senior Member Geeto67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    18,456
    BEFORE you begin a full tear down....make sure certain parts are available for this bike as well. pointless to try and rebuild anything if the clutch isn't available. Also don't see the point in splitting the cases if you can't get crank bearings or a crank seal (does this bike even have a crank seal? you need to know).

    you probably have a week of book learnin' to do before you are even in the shop unscrewing shit.


    regarding you attitude: I have seen this thread and your other build thread. It is a safe assumption you know very little about motorcycles and what you do know pop culture (TV, magazines, other shithead scenester motorcyclists) has taught you. The TV chopper culture has done a pretty good job of fucking over the rest of motorcycling by being an infectious blight on other genre's that require a different approach. really only choppers are about how cool something looks, most of the rest of motorcycling is defined by how cool it works. It is nice to think any bike can be a performance motorcycle since with enough welding rod any engine can be a chopper, but really platform selection is key. There is a reason why guys don't road race honda magna's (even in vintage classes). I think if you let go of this "how cool am I for doing this" attitude and focus more on the fact you have a lot to learn you'll do much better. A lot of the other stuff you have done with your other bikes may be cool from a chopper perspective, but from a performance motorcycling perspective you don't get it...yet and you are just getting angry at the people trying to tell you that.
    And then you go, "Well, my brother can jump over, like, 10 garbage cans." and then I'll say something cool like, "if I can keep the front wheel from bursting into flames," okay? and don't forget to call me "THE HANKINATOR."

  7. #26
    Senior Member TSwami's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Roanoke, Virginia, USA.
    Posts
    818
    Step 1) Don't tear apart the motor yet! Is the engine stuck? Will it kick over but not fire? All of these are things you need to know from the outset and you should have figured out before you pulled it out of the frame. Its a lot harder to figure this all out with the engine out of the frame.

    With that said these engines are pretty simple. As I mentioned earlier there is one on ebay right now completely disassembled for $35 buy it now. You can see from that picture on ebay there isn't much to it. However everything you pull apart will cost more money. You'll need all new gaskets and bearings and new rings and possible new piston. Probably a whole clutch pack. Other than that its simple. Do some reading and figure out what needs to be done. The hardest part is setting the points and timing.

    Its easy to buy a bearing kit off of ebay if someone assembled one for your bike (I assume they dont), but it will be cheaper and probably the only option for you to find a parts store and take the bearings to them and have them match them up. That way you don't screw up a measurement or something and have it not work.

    Again, dont tear it apart yet. I'm not a mechanic, I'm a banker by trade but I've torn down and rebuilt plenty of motorcycle engines. Take your time, get some help and you'll be better off in the long run.
    Faster, faster, faster, until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death. ~Hunter Thompson

  8. #27
    Senior Member Dean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,121
    Listen to the guys... get your Yamaha service manual and proper tools.

    I did a quick parts availability check for you.... complete engine gasket kits, seal kits and bearings are all available. The same kits fit the AT125, 175 and CT125/175 for '69-'73.
    Aside from complete kits, individal seal and bearings on your bike were used on dozens of models and applications for 30 years so there no issue with availability ! The clutch and friction plates are also common to many , many models and widely available.

    Even IF the motor did turn freely and things inside "feel ok" .. I offer caution when it comes to the old, unknown crank seals in that engine... you will learn new things - ( like leak down test etc.) That little motor is really ideal for a first timer.. it does not get much simpler than a two stroke single..... however be patient, do everything step by step , per the manual and have some fun with it.

  9. #28
    Senior Member Joep7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    West MI, USA.
    Posts
    1,207
    Quote Originally Posted by kerosene View Post
    but what really makes me wonder is how can a 14 year old bitch have an 8 year old daughter?
    Made me smile...


    3 threads....3 internet cock fights

    This guy isnt interested in contributing. Just wants us to hold his hand and his dick at the same time and praise him for his "art".

    Prove us wrong...

  10. #29
    Senior Member TCed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    traverse city, mi, USA.
    Posts
    1,243
    Quote Originally Posted by ALBA View Post
    Maybe instead of shit talking we could comunicate productively? So I am asking all the young and old farts on here to help me help myself and learn this motor.
    First take your bi-polar medication.
    Here's your choices fast, cheap, reliable. Pick two.

  11. #30
    Senior Member dirkchecken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    south plainfield, nj, nj, USA.
    Posts
    1,541
    Quote Originally Posted by ALBA View Post
    Fanny asspack wearing
    hey Dean-tell me this isn't true?
    its cross season buddy,.. no "café racers" just trying to get more performance from these classic m/c's.. 76 suzuki gt/tr rep vin 3 race bike USCRA # 297,.. FrameCrafters/Seeley framed H1 500 race/project. 82 Suzuki gs550m katana, 75 S3 400 kawasaki, 70 kawasaki a7 350 avenger.... name is tom . http://www.highsider.com/nations.htm

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. 1969 Yamaha L5T
    By Izzy2213 in forum Project Builds
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 05-18-2012, 07:31 PM
  2. 1971 Yamaha cs3 2 stroke 200cc
    By DanMan68 in forum General
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 09-07-2011, 07:42 AM
  3. 1971 yamaha 200 electric start
    By 71yammy in forum General
    Replies: 65
    Last Post: 08-01-2010, 08:04 PM
  4. 1971 Yamaha R5
    By cseger1 in forum Bikes For Sale
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-05-2009, 09:19 PM
  5. 1969 yamaha track bike 100 cc - $300 San Fran
    By Eurago in forum Bikes For Sale
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-27-2009, 03:24 AM

Search tags for this page

1971 yamaha at1
,
1971 yamaha r5 crank seal reolacement
,
71 yamaha r5
,
lifan motor 150
,

yamaha at1

,
yamaha at1 cafe
,
yamaha at1 cafe racer
,

yamaha at1 forum

,
yamaha r5 mods
Click on a term to search for related topics.