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Which one to get?

This is a discussion on Which one to get? within the Craigslist/Ebay forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; Originally Posted by ardew I'm definitely willing to consider something else, i just always like the naked bike look and the cafe racer bikes. I ...

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  1. #21
    Senior Member Geeto67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ardew View Post
    I'm definitely willing to consider something else, i just always like the naked bike look and the cafe racer bikes.
    I already know I am going to regret this....

    if you want to stay old SOHC cb750, this is the one you want:
    Honda CB750F super sport 1978
    It has external wiring (not the earlier internally run stuff), the brakes are upgradable to the later dual piston calipers, and it has the factory performance mods to bring it back up to 75hp (claimed factory). No you can't swap the wheels out of spokes because somehow I know you are going to ask. Downside to this bike is because of the bigger valves honda put in the engine the valve guides wear at some point, but that is probably a point much further than you are actually going to ride the thing. As a newbie rider I wouldn't even try to ride the old SOHC cb750s with the single disc front brake and swing caliper setup - it's just not good.

    Mods I would do are: dual piston caliper conversion, K&N replacement filter in the factory airbox (no pods!!!!I mean it), avon roadrider tires, braided brake lines, superbike handle bar (no clubman or clipons), and hagon shocks. It will feel heavy at slow speeds because it's 500lbs, but it isn't a slouch and you can easily get in over your head with it if not careful. The best part is that all the "custom" parts that fit SOHC cb750s will fit this bike so if later on you want to build a CR750 replica you can use the tank and seat that fits all SOHC cb750s.

    If you are going to consider a DOHC cb750 (1979-1982) this is what you want:
    1981 Honda CB900 F
    CB750F supersport. It's a heavy bike for sure but it feels modern. The bodywork is inspired by old tracy bodies and was made famous in racing by freddie spencer so don't fucking touch it for a plank seat and whatever the fuck brat styling is because you can't get more cafe racer than this. It already has the dual piston calipers and a cut down seat and superbike bars and 4-1 header so it's pretty ready to go, the only thing I would do is put the stock airbox back on and maybe better shocks. Later on maybe a cbr 600 wheel conversion.

    but really what you should buy is this:
    2014 Royal Enfield B5 , 3900 or BO

    Its new, there is dealer support, they are super simple, light, easy to operate, its fuel injected, and there is an active members forum. They also get 72mpg if you are light with the throttle.


    you could also go with this:
    http://newyork.craigslist.org/brk/mcy/5800574968.html
    because somehow I get the feeling recommending a proper beginners bike like a ninja 250 is not going to sit well with you. It is still one of the good ones in that it is a metal tank and better quality than the 2005+ bikes.

    YOu have one job as a newbie rider - that's to learn to ride and not get killed by an inattentive woman on a cell phone driving an esclade. You don't really know how difficult that is on the Long Island/NYC area till you start doing it. This is why old bikes will suck for you, because you need all the brake and suspension you can get and not to be distracted by old broken shit. After you have been riding for 2 years and not killed yourself, get an old bike as a second bike. capiche?

    I'm out in nassau LI
    Nassau's a big place, they have names of towns in Nassau?
    Last edited by Geeto67; 10-11-2016 at 01:00 PM.
    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.
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    A tool is just an opportunity with a handle
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  2. #22
    Senior Member Andyshep's Avatar
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    +1 on the Enfield. They do actually do a cafe racer that looks decent.

  3. #23
    Junior Member ardew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geeto67 View Post
    I already know I am going to regret this....
    Why do you say that?

    Quote Originally Posted by Geeto67 View Post
    I know you are going to ask.
    Not me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Geeto67 View Post
    You don't really know how difficult that is on the Long Island/NYC area till you start doing it.
    I've ridden on the GCP before they paved it and and on the LI from the 50s to the 30s it scared the sh*t out of me.

    If you think I really should pick up a ninja 250 I'll look into it.
    Thank you.



    Quote Originally Posted by Geeto67 View Post
    Nassau's a big place, they have names of towns in Nassau?
    ha.
    im in port washignton

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  5. #24
    Senior Member jaguar's Avatar
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    This is what you seek.
    drgonzo and ardew like this.
    I am Derby\'s Bitch


    Some times things come around that are so singularly inept it gives you a whole new appreciation for the ept

  6. #25
    Senior Member Stephen J's Avatar
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    The Ninja 250 is (according to what I've read) an excellent starter bike. I know Geeto and several other knowledgeable riders have endorsed them in the past.The bike that works for me, would be serious overkill in a city. It's gotta suit what you do, which is why the "looks " factor should go out the window. I've always thought a Super Moto would make a good city threader with some fun factor built in. Wouldn't know from experience but it seems like it would be a good fit. Cities drive me round the bend so I avoid them like a plague. The wrong bike can make riding SUCK so get all your info together before throwing money at one. Asking here was a good move, listening would be a great one. Looking forward to seeing what you decide on. Good luck
    ardew and drgonzo like this.
    If you can't pick it back up, don't ride it.

  7. #26
    Senior Member Geeto67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ardew View Post
    im in port washignton
    Manhasset here.

    At the end of the day I just want you to have a positive riding experience. A positive experience means you are more likely to stay in the hobby and enjoy it to it's fullest.

    I started riding at 15, quit for a breif while in college and came back to it by buying a SOHC cb750. It was the first bike I put any real street miles on. At the time it was barely a 20 year old motorcycle and was somewhat reliable. I rode it everywhere from Manhattan to Montauk, had 1 bad accident on it, dropped it numerous times, and learned a ton about motorcycles. I went from sharing the road with 1970's and 80's used cars to sharing the road with 90's and 2000's cars where the brakes and acceleration of traffic improved dramatically. Now that bike is 40 years old and makes a great weekend toy, and I could commute on it if I wanted to, but only because I have 20+ years of riding experience.

    If you were looking to repeat the cycle, a 20 year old bike or newer would something from the 1990's that you could ride into the ground and learn a lot. It's not a 40 year old bike where you have to battle twice as much entropy and twice as many previous owner's mistakes. But the nice thing about the modern era is that more modern stuff has depreciated to the point where you can afford it so you don't even need to start with a 20 year old bike any more.

    You already had the SV650, so I understand if you don't want to go back to that. But get something that you don't have to worry about. The enfield (2009+ UCE bikes only) is literally all the benefits of a classic bike with almost none of the maintenance, however, it doesn't come with the modern speed either and you could potentially get bored on it (as a commuter I loved riding one because it was so light and easy but a speed demon it is not).

    You need miles, you need experience, how you drive vs how you ride are different things and you may not even appreciate that until you have a few thousand miles under your belt. Focus on that. You'll know the hook has set when you find you want to ride more often than you want to use the car.
    Last edited by Geeto67; 10-11-2016 at 03:58 PM.
    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.
    - Samuel Beckett
    A tool is just an opportunity with a handle
    - Kevin Kelly

  8. #27
    Junior Member ardew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geeto67 View Post
    Manhasset here.
    Small world.
    I cut through plandome rd to get to the LIE all the time.
    Thanks again for all the info.

  9. #28
    Banned DohcBikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen J View Post
    The Ninja 250 is (according to what I've read) an excellent starter bike.
    Ninja 250 is an excellent bike at any level. Not every bike needs to do 100mph.
    ardew likes this.

  10. #29
    Junior Member ardew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geeto67 View Post
    Manhasset here.

    At the end of the day I just want you to have a positive riding experience. A positive experience means you are more likely to stay in the hobby and enjoy it to it's fullest.

    I started riding at 15, quit for a breif while in college and came back to it by buying a SOHC cb750. It was the first bike I put any real street miles on. At the time it was barely a 20 year old motorcycle and was somewhat reliable. I rode it everywhere from Manhattan to Montauk, had 1 bad accident on it, dropped it numerous times, and learned a ton about motorcycles. I went from sharing the road with 1970's and 80's used cars to sharing the road with 90's and 2000's cars where the brakes and acceleration of traffic improved dramatically. Now that bike is 40 years old and makes a great weekend toy, and I could commute on it if I wanted to, but only because I have 20+ years of riding experience.

    If you were looking to repeat the cycle, a 20 year old bike or newer would something from the 1990's that you could ride into the ground and learn a lot. It's not a 40 year old bike where you have to battle twice as much entropy and twice as many previous owner's mistakes. But the nice thing about the modern era is that more modern stuff has depreciated to the point where you can afford it so you don't even need to start with a 20 year old bike any more.

    You already had the SV650, so I understand if you don't want to go back to that. But get something that you don't have to worry about. The enfield (2009+ UCE bikes only) is literally all the benefits of a classic bike with almost none of the maintenance, however, it doesn't come with the modern speed either and you could potentially get bored on it (as a commuter I loved riding one because it was so light and easy but a speed demon it is not).

    You need miles, you need experience, how you drive vs how you ride are different things and you may not even appreciate that until you have a few thousand miles under your belt. Focus on that. You'll know the hook has set when you find you want to ride more often than you want to use the car.
    I missed all this before.
    Makes total sense now and I get it.

    I'll look into the enfield.
    I'm willing to go back to an sv. Do you recommend that?

  11. #30
    Senior Member Geeto67's Avatar
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    Sv650 is a fine bike, but ask yourself - why didn't you ride it more the last time? Was it too much to manage? Did you feel intimidated by it? Did you ever get off it with the feeling you would kill yourself on it one day? Or was it boring? Put some thought into it and then let us know in detail.

    im a big fan of people riding anything and everything so they get a feel of what they like in motorcycling.

    Gold Coast on Jericho tpke is an Enfield dealer if you want to see one up close without committing to anything. Bikes are $5k-$7k new and can be financed. Used is the best way to go because I think a basic bonneville is $8k and much more motorcycle.

    You our may or may not know it but port Washington was once the motorcycling nirvana thanks to sonny and sal at Ghost Motorcycles.
    Last edited by Geeto67; 10-11-2016 at 07:49 PM.
    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.
    - Samuel Beckett
    A tool is just an opportunity with a handle
    - Kevin Kelly

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