What to recomend to a wanna be rider
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What to recomend to a wanna be rider

This is a discussion on What to recomend to a wanna be rider within the General forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; Hey guys, Not me, I'm not the newbie rider. But, since I Blog for Savings.com, and I get tired of answering the questions of casual ...

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  1. #1
    Senior Member parkwood60's Avatar
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    What to recomend to a wanna be rider

    Hey guys,

    Not me, I'm not the newbie rider. But, since I Blog for Savings.com, and I get tired of answering the questions of casual acquaintances who think they want to learn, and buy a bike. So instead of writing a blog about saving money I wrote one about becoming a rider and getting a bike. If you guys have any bikes that top the list of cheap and cheerful recommendations to the first timer, I'd love to hear them. Comment on the blog, or post them here and I'll add them. Here's the link:

    http://www.savings.com/blog/post/Joi...ls-to-Two.html

    Woody
    Whitworth - The whole Western World economy runs on total lies and BS: I'm a part of the action.

  2. #2
    Senior Member UncleErnie's Avatar
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    Suzuki TU250X
    Yamaha XT250
    Suzuki GS500
    Royal Enfield Bullet
    Honda Ascot
    CM400
    Nighthawk 250 or 450
    Most Honda CB's fromm 175 up
    Yamaha SR500
    MotoGuzzi V50
    BMW R65
    LOOK OUT IT\'S COMING THIS WAY!

  3. #3
    Senior Member UncleErnie's Avatar
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    Suzuki TU250X
    Yamaha XT250
    Suzuki GS500
    Royal Enfield Bullet
    Honda Ascot
    CM400
    Nighthawk 250 or 450
    Most Honda CB's fromm 175 up
    Yamaha SR500
    MotoGuzzi V50
    BMW R65
    LOOK OUT IT\'S COMING THIS WAY!

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  5. #4
    Senior Member parkwood60's Avatar
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    I agree with most of those. But I would have a hard time recommending a Royal Enfield, BMW or Guzzi to someone who knows nothing about bikes. Plus, I don't think they are easy to find or cheap to buy/fix
    Whitworth - The whole Western World economy runs on total lies and BS: I'm a part of the action.

  6. #5
    Senior Member parkwood60's Avatar
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    I agree with most of those. But I would have a hard time recommending a Royal Enfield, BMW or Guzzi to someone who knows nothing about bikes. Plus, I don't think they are easy to find or cheap to buy/fix
    Whitworth - The whole Western World economy runs on total lies and BS: I'm a part of the action.

  7. #6
    Senior Member UncleErnie's Avatar
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    The Enfield would be harder to find cheap, but all 3 of those bikes are dead easy to maintain -or learn on- and have TONS of on-line support. All are tractable and forgiving. The Beemer and the Guzzi are maybe a tad heavy for smaller riders to learn on, but not everyone learning to ride is of diminutive propertions, either.

    An R65 or V50 can easily be had for $1500 to $2K- in good running condition.

    Kind of creepy that I'm the only one with any recommendations...
    LOOK OUT IT\'S COMING THIS WAY!

  8. #7
    Senior Member UncleErnie's Avatar
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    The Enfield would be harder to find cheap, but all 3 of those bikes are dead easy to maintain -or learn on- and have TONS of on-line support. All are tractable and forgiving. The Beemer and the Guzzi are maybe a tad heavy for smaller riders to learn on, but not everyone learning to ride is of diminutive propertions, either.

    An R65 or V50 can easily be had for $1500 to $2K- in good running condition.

    Kind of creepy that I'm the only one with any recommendations...
    LOOK OUT IT\'S COMING THIS WAY!

  9. #8
    Senior Member Geeto67's Avatar
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    I have long stopped recommending "old" bike (1970s and earlier) to newbie riders because you have to wrench on them and most newbies should focus on riding skills not "will it run on 3 cylinders" or "how do I get it home with a broken clutch cable".

    The new UCE enfiled bullet is near maintenance free, fuel injected, and flat an awesome bike. I rode one from NYC to Rhinebeck NY for the vintage show and back in one day doing 80 on the highway the whole way and it gave me no issues and was a really easy bike to ride. If you don't recommend these to new riders looking for vintage looks then you are missing out. Comes with a warranty and financing, what more could a beginner want?

    Older enfields are kind of hit or miss, you have to want to put up with a little bullet quirkiness.

    To Unc's list I would add Ninja 250 and 500, and even the Ninja 650 twin (sv650 competitor) and SV650.

    the thing you need to emphasize is it isn't displacement that makes a good beginner bike, it is power to weight. A sportster 1200 is 1200ccs but it makes like 40 hp and depending on the model is an excellent beginner bike (nightster, iron, and the other lowered models excluded), where as a ninja 600 is 130hp+ and a rolling death machine. Too many people try to draw the line on how big the engine is and lets face it if you lump a 600cc inline racing four in the same category as a 650cc para twin you are a moron. General statements like 600cc bikes are beginner bikes is the kind of thing that gets people hurt.

    As far as the BMW is concerned the R65 is not one of the early 50-60s stye beamers but one of the dead nuts relaible ones from the eighties. So easy even my wife can ride one, reliable as the day is long, and managible power. A good clean one will cost you $2K tops and about the only downside is the parts are expensive, but if it is maintained properly you will never need more then filters, tires, and fluids. I am starting to think you don't know much about bikes mr. parkwood and are letting what you hear about the reputation of vintage european bikes color your opinion, which is a disservice to your readers.

    The Guzzi v50 is another excellent bike but finding one is difficult and parts are expensive. otherwise another reliable road burner. In my opinion the only one worth having is the v50 monza which is a baby lemans and the looks alone will make it worth it to deal with expensive parts, which again you wont need if the bike was maintained.


    Another good bike if people can find one is the w650. these bikes have a cult status and such are hard to find cheap but they are worth the price of admission.

    Also I would consider early eighties GS550s, and the 450 twins as well. The 70's ones are good as well but you need to know something about bikes these days to buy a 70s bike.
    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.
    - Samuel Beckett
    A tool is just an opportunity with a handle
    - Kevin Kelly

  10. #9
    Senior Member Geeto67's Avatar
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    I have long stopped recommending "old" bike (1970s and earlier) to newbie riders because you have to wrench on them and most newbies should focus on riding skills not "will it run on 3 cylinders" or "how do I get it home with a broken clutch cable".

    The new UCE enfiled bullet is near maintenance free, fuel injected, and flat an awesome bike. I rode one from NYC to Rhinebeck NY for the vintage show and back in one day doing 80 on the highway the whole way and it gave me no issues and was a really easy bike to ride. If you don't recommend these to new riders looking for vintage looks then you are missing out. Comes with a warranty and financing, what more could a beginner want?

    Older enfields are kind of hit or miss, you have to want to put up with a little bullet quirkiness.

    To Unc's list I would add Ninja 250 and 500, and even the Ninja 650 twin (sv650 competitor) and SV650.

    the thing you need to emphasize is it isn't displacement that makes a good beginner bike, it is power to weight. A sportster 1200 is 1200ccs but it makes like 40 hp and depending on the model is an excellent beginner bike (nightster, iron, and the other lowered models excluded), where as a ninja 600 is 130hp+ and a rolling death machine. Too many people try to draw the line on how big the engine is and lets face it if you lump a 600cc inline racing four in the same category as a 650cc para twin you are a moron. General statements like 600cc bikes are beginner bikes is the kind of thing that gets people hurt.

    As far as the BMW is concerned the R65 is not one of the early 50-60s stye beamers but one of the dead nuts relaible ones from the eighties. So easy even my wife can ride one, reliable as the day is long, and managible power. A good clean one will cost you $2K tops and about the only downside is the parts are expensive, but if it is maintained properly you will never need more then filters, tires, and fluids. I am starting to think you don't know much about bikes mr. parkwood and are letting what you hear about the reputation of vintage european bikes color your opinion, which is a disservice to your readers.

    The Guzzi v50 is another excellent bike but finding one is difficult and parts are expensive. otherwise another reliable road burner. In my opinion the only one worth having is the v50 monza which is a baby lemans and the looks alone will make it worth it to deal with expensive parts, which again you wont need if the bike was maintained.


    Another good bike if people can find one is the w650. these bikes have a cult status and such are hard to find cheap but they are worth the price of admission.

    Also I would consider early eighties GS550s, and the 450 twins as well. The 70's ones are good as well but you need to know something about bikes these days to buy a 70s bike.
    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.
    - Samuel Beckett
    A tool is just an opportunity with a handle
    - Kevin Kelly

  11. #10
    Senior Member parkwood60's Avatar
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    I'll admit I don't know much about the European bikes. I just assumed that the BMW and the Guzzi were like all German and Italian vehicles, maybe cheap to buy, but expensive to fix. I worked as a motorcycle messenger in L.A. from 1995-2005 on and off, so I know a thing or two. Pretty much all the bike I recommended were ones you can find several in 10 minutes of looking on craigslist, anywhere in the country. From experience I know GS500s and Ninja EX500s are all over the place, so you have your choice and can find a good one in no time. Same thing with Rebel 250s, but the Rebel 450 is a rare model and if you start looking you are luck to find one, and will pay a premium. I know, I wouldn't be caught bead on a Rebel, or a Shadow, but they are great choices for beginners, especially shorter riders. I didn't recommend the Nighthawk or CM450 because I have't seen a clean one of them for sale in a while. They all seem to be ridden to death and left uncovered in a carport. The Ninja 650 and SV650 are great bikes, and the nice thing is you won't soon out grow one of those, but I can't find on for sale on craigslist for less that $2500 in working condition. Same for the BMW and the Guzzi, now that I do a quick search on www.craiglook.com. I would love a nice W650 for $2000, but it doesn't exist. I would say you have to be committed and willing to do some work if you buy anything made more than 25 years ago, no matter what it is.

    Go over and check out the list, and try to remember what it was like when you first got a bike. I will tell you I thankfully knew one guy who told me which was the clutch and which was the brake, and away I went. And that summer my 22 year old CL450 barely ever ran right, and then the cam chain jumped a tooth. After redoing the top end in my 3rd floor bedroom, and finally getting the carbs and points in sync, I had a blast. But it was at least a year after buying it before I could start it and go somewhere on it reliably.

    Go over and check out my list: http://www.savings.com/blog/post/Joi...ls-to-Two.html I'm fairly certain most of those bikes will offer a Summer's worth of learning experience without a single trip to the shop.

    Woody
    Whitworth - The whole Western World economy runs on total lies and BS: I'm a part of the action.

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