Best Bike For Beginner Rider/First Cafe Build - Page 2
Close

Best Bike For Beginner Rider/First Cafe Build

This is a discussion on Best Bike For Beginner Rider/First Cafe Build within the General forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; generic answer - most applies. (you did answer some) "do you have any experience? how big are you? how much money are you willing to ...

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 35
  1. #11
    Senior Member kerosene's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Southern Finland
    Posts
    2,087
    generic answer - most applies. (you did answer some)

    "do you have any experience? how big are you? how much money are you willing to spend (lose).

    If you have very little or no experience I would man up and and accept that you will need smaller and maybe not so cool short term bike. Reasons are listed here:

    1. You will learn faster on small bike. Really. Were you to spend 1st 1000-2000 miles on small bike you will be better rider at 5000 miles than if you went straight for a big bike. I use miles instead of months as there are a lot of "riders" who have ridden twice a year for 5 years. Small bike is easier to handle in parking lots, easier to pick up when you drop it, less intimidating generally. Its much better to learn on a bike where you quickly feel like the master. Real learning starts only after that actually.

    2. Cheap common bikes (ninja 250, rebel 250 or other smaller starter bikes) hold their value great. You can buy a 2500$ ninja 250, put 2000 miles on it and sell it after 10 months and only lose 0-300$ on depreciation. Parts are cheap too should something break.

    3. You are likely to drop your bike. If its used older beater its no drama and less $$ to learn the hard way.

    4. As a new rider (especially if younger) insurance costs a lot. When you buy a 2000-3000$ bike you don't need full coverage and adding scratch is not going to ruin its value.


    Even if cruiser is what you want to ride I would consider a more neutral bike (so called standard) as they are good to learn on. Once you have put some miles you are much better educated on what kind of riding you actually enjoy. Maybe more of a tourer is your thing, or you fall in love with having more speed and control, or maybe back roads are calling for dual sporting (gravel road oriented bikes).

    Don't let other peoples ideas dictate you into (or away for that matter) any particular style of biking. Get a bike, ride and decide for yourself.

    But again read my list esp. #1 is true - we have seen the fools with giant Harleys struggling with the weight and being visibly uncomfortable - or the sports bike guy who slams on gas on straight but can't take a corner at all in fear of all the power.

    You will learn faster on a small bike. Trust me. Then if you ride quite a bit you might be ready to switch to your dream bike in half a year or maybe even sooner - but do the start right.

    and buy a full face helmet + proper gear. Yeah it doesn't look s cool on a HD but nose and lower jaw are nice things to have.

    bikes:
    Buell Blast, Honda Rebel 250, Ninja 250 (little sportier though), etc. Dual sports are actually good for skill but quite far from cruisers."
    -

  2. #12
    Senior Member coreyjdl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    McAlester, Oklahoma, USA.
    Posts
    2,355
    i recommend standards and dual sports as first bikes all the time at the shop - but no one believes me.


    and then they wreck and are in an induced comma for a month.


    and i say "i told you so asshole."

    also don't buy a ninja 250 as a first bike. the fairings are too costly when you drop it. its more of a second bike or so of someone who really just needs a commuter.

    don't buy a rebel or virago 250 or gz if you are a grown ass man. they don't teach you how to drive a motorcycle, only how to ride. plus you won't really fit.

    give your self some room to learn how to lean in the curves. every cruiser i ride i scrape something. its obnoxious. its like hitting the curb every time you drive but because your car sucks and not you.

    any cheesy old 80's bike that runs and titles is best to learn on.
    get as close to the goal as possible or be ready to sell it AND BEFORE you hack at it.

    if its not a standard platform (ie broke back) just sell it in as good a shape as you got it .
    then find the bike you really want.



  3. #13
    Junior Member Rob117's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Little Rock, Arkansas, USA.
    Posts
    8
    Awesome advice kerosene, I'm leaning towards getting a ninja 250 just because of the added "sportiness" of it compared to the rebel. Hopefully I can pick one up in the upcoming weeks. One of these days I'll be worthy of riding a sweet cafe bike!

  4. Remove Advertisements
    CafeRacer.net
    Advertisements
     

  5. #14
    Junior Member Rob117's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Little Rock, Arkansas, USA.
    Posts
    8
    @coreyjdl: well since I'm probably going to drop one, and the ninja fairings are costly, how would this bike be for a starter? Its in my area and is pretty cheap. Its one of those 80's bikes you mentioned.

    http://littlerock.craigslist.org/mcy/2512753924.html

  6. #15
    Senior Member coreyjdl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    McAlester, Oklahoma, USA.
    Posts
    2,355
    looks great as a bike, seems clean - but is still a tad high on price - don't hack at it. sell it for not much less than you bought it for.

    w/e you do don't try to make that a cafe racer. it won't make a racer and you'll devalue the hell out of it.


  7. #16
    Senior Member coreyjdl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    McAlester, Oklahoma, USA.
    Posts
    2,355
    btw thats not a seca. seca is a standard. - its a maxim which is the cruiser platform.

    you should pay a lot less than a grand for it.

    http://www.nadaguides.com/Motorcycle...J-MAXIM/Values

  8. #17
    Senior Member hillsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
    Posts
    6,568
    That bike is a Maxim, not a Seca. The Maxim is the cruiser variant, the Seca is the "standard" version.

    The Seca would be better, but still the 550 Yamaha motor is sweet in either guise. Very under-rated and it won't smash to bits if it falls off it's side-stand (like a new 250 Ninja).

  9. #18
    Senior Member KeninIowa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,670
    I'm disappointed in Little Rock's CL, mostly sucky bikes.

    You should have bought this for around $800, but it's sold. http://littlerock.craigslist.org/mcy/2501780247.html

    If the seller can come up with a plausible story of why the front fender's gone and I'm not sure if 99's had lowers maybe this; http://littlerock.craigslist.org/mcy/2487360358.html

    Corey's right, find a KLX250 or somesuch, add barkbusters, case savers, decent street tires. Go full on hooligan. It falls over, pick it up go again.


  10. #19
    Senior Member kerosene's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Southern Finland
    Posts
    2,087
    the older ninjas ( <2009 or something) have the benefit that they were produced unchanged for a looong time. Means lost of ebay parts at not so inflated prices.

    -

  11. #20
    Senior Member Geeto67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    23,266
    Real advice? OK.....

    1) stop talking about culture, scene, etc.....That is just a bunch of shit people who have magazines, tv shows, clothing lines use to exploit you into buying a lifestyle that has nothing to do with bikes. Seriously. I understand your enthusiasm but knock it off it makes you sound lame. So does using the word "Cafe" and phrases like "sweet cafe". ick.

    2) most of the beginner stuff has already been covered so I'll just hit a few points: The older the bike is the more you are going to have to work on it and the more challenging the projects when it stops running. If you are not up to the task then stick to something from the 90's or newer. Also The more plastic a bike has the more expensive it is to repair after you drop it, and you will drop it. I am not saying you will crash, but pushing it around (like into a parking space), or parking it with the kickstand directly on hot asphalt in the summer (bike sinks in and falls over), or even forgetting to put your feet down at a stop light. It happens.

    3) The best riders come from dirt. why? because on dirt you have to be "rider active" instead of "rider passive". Too many newbies get on their beginner bikes and get locked into position, thinking the bike will just carry them like a sack of potatoes. Your weight it a tool in learning how to ride and nothing forces yout o move around on a bike more than trying to go fast off road. To this end I have to agree a dual sport might be the best beginner bike for you - hardly any plastics, you can get all sorts of crash bars, and ride on road and off road. KLR, XL600 honda, DR350 or DR500, these are what you should look for. That isn't to say you can't learn to be rider active on a street bike, but the opportunities to throw your weight around are less, and it is much easier to get in over your head and get hurt.

    4) your needs for the bike determine how you mod things. yes "cafe racers" came from the 60's but it didn't die there - in fact it didn't really fall out of fashion until the early 1990s when the first true sport bikes finally became affordable on the used market. The "movement" came from us modifying our bikes because we wanted to go fast and all we could afford were crappy 70's jap bikes. That isn't the case anymore as 60's and 70's japanese bikes are no longer cheap-ish (some are). IT wasn't a looks driven scenario, we wanted roadracers for the street and so we built them, now you can go in and buy a zx10 and get exactly that. most of us still dick with old bikes because now it is what we are comfortable with, and we have had decades of our lives wrapped up in that riding experience, but a lot of us own new bikes too, touring rigs, etc.....point it even tho they are fun a bike is still a tool and you need to have the right tool for the job.
    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.
    - Samuel Beckett
    A tool is just an opportunity with a handle
    - Kevin Kelly

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Best bike for a short rider?
    By Abswed in forum General
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 08-02-2012, 12:23 AM
  2. New Bike, new rider couple questions
    By 68riviera430 in forum General
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-22-2012, 12:34 AM
  3. '74 Suzuki TS250 beginner build - Seattle, WA
    By MotoPhotog in forum Project Builds
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 04-19-2012, 10:42 AM
  4. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-30-2009, 12:05 PM
  5. Replies: 19
    Last Post: 11-05-2009, 12:27 PM

Search tags for this page

beginner cafe racer

,
best beginner cafe racer
,
best beginner cafe racer build
,

best cafe racer for beginner

,
best starter cafe racer bike
,
cafe racer beginner
,

cafe racer for beginners

,
cafe racer starter bikes
,
starter cafe racer
Click on a term to search for related topics.