Average Build Time for a Cafe Racer?
Close

Average Build Time for a Cafe Racer?

This is a discussion on Average Build Time for a Cafe Racer? within the General forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; Whats the thoughts on how much time it takes for an average bike build? I know Cafe type bikes arent `technically built`, but you know ...

Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 61
Like Tree15Likes

Thread: Average Build Time for a Cafe Racer?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Mark Burton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Midlands UK
    Posts
    1,493

    Average Build Time for a Cafe Racer?

    Whats the thoughts on how much time it takes for an average bike build? I know Cafe type bikes arent `technically built`, but you know what I mean. I just wonder sometimes after spending a full day working on a part or something and on stepping back, its swallowed into insignificance by everything else around it needing similar attention.

    I dont know how professional shops price for restoration work, I truly dont and credit to them. When I was in the Collision Repair business on modern vehicles with no un-known horrors to be found, I could quite easily estimate in 1/10ths of an hour, a 50 or 60 hour repair that could total £6k and be within plus or minus 2.5% of that figure at invoicing.

    I just wonder what sort of time, in hours and not including pissing about with a cup of tea in your hand, admiring the efforts of your labour, people have spent on a bike.

    Hipster hack and rattle can jobs are going to be fast, I know that. As are the `bolt on` dress-up bikes, its the engine tear down, proper racer inspired type of project I`m curious about. Maybe it would be good to get an idea for all 3 types, which would be handy for anyone considering taking on a project.

    I keep track on mine, after deductions for organizing tools, and setting up the bench etc, I am into it for over 150 hours. Its crazy, I know.

  2. #2
    Member doogalman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    , , United Kingdom.
    Posts
    40
    The answer for me is as long as it takes then when you change details a few years on because you think it could be better, even more. Some builds are a preoccupation , a love affair, a dedicated past-time.
    Originally built my Triton 8 years ago and is now in about it's 5th incarnation. Everything is hand fettled and modified.
    I'm not an engineer but winter is always time to play away with hacksaws and files.
    Name:  triton 2014 013.JPG
Views: 814
Size:  867.2 KB

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mark Burton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Midlands UK
    Posts
    1,493
    Its those hand fettled and modified parts that soak up time isnt it. Ive got a spare pair of those large alloy, finned exhaust collars in my `stash`. Let me know if you ever break one.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    CafeRacer.net
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Senior Member jaguar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    10,437
    Thing is that some of that "looking at the bike with a cup of tea" time is billable if you are charging for the bike.
    I am Derby\'s Bitch


    Some times things come around that are so singularly inept it gives you a whole new appreciation for the ept

  6. #5
    Senior Member Wydglyd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    182
    Are they ever really "finished"? To me there's always something to improve or modify.
    Took me two years of nights, weekends, and days off to hand build my Harley based chopper. Rode it for a year, fell off and it's now being reborn.
    "Paint it Black until they invent something darker"

  7. #6
    Senior Member Geeto67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    23,274
    Years. If you are doing right then years and it is never really done.
    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.
    - Samuel Beckett
    A tool is just an opportunity with a handle
    - Kevin Kelly

  8. #7
    Senior Member Cyorg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,107
    I couldn't even guess how long it would take to get as far as you have. It's the A.D.D. that does me in.... along with the fact that I can't stick with one hobby. I start by hauling a frame out of the shed and then get distracted by a 35' wood Chris Craft that enters my life. Three years to get that into the ocean. Then I'm perusing the local Craigslist ads, and there is a 911 SC for sale just around the corner listed for $1000.... how could you pass that up, even if you don't want one....so now that displaces the M/C frame. I suppose it's like the man said, it's not the destination.....it's the journey.
    You may be spending a lot of time on that bike Mark, but it's certainly time well spent.

    Ps. I think Jag is correct. Sometimes sitting there staring at the bike can be one of the most important parts of the project.
    TCed and Wydglyd like this.

  9. #8
    Member doogalman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    , , United Kingdom.
    Posts
    40
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Burton View Post
    Its those hand fettled and modified parts that soak up time isnt it..
    But also set your bike apart from anything else out there. I love looking at peoples self built detail parts to see how they solve issues. Your Spanner brake tie-bar springs to mind.

  10. #9
    Senior Member roccitycafe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Rochester, New York, USA.
    Posts
    1,412
    anywhere from a month to 10 years.

    depends on what you're doing, what your goals are and how many times you've done something similar, if you're continuously upgrading things because you're riding it constantly and chasing better performance, then your goal is open ended and it will never really be done, that and you acquire more tools as you go on, so some things you wanted to do earlier you now can. if you're building a bike with a goal in mind, like, turning a 400f into a 466 with a racing cam and bored carbs, and it's something you've done before, then you can finish rather quickly, especially if you standardize a lot of the things you do, like using the same rearset design, clipon design, etc, the longer you build things, the more notebooks you wind up with, and these save lots of time

  11. #10
    Senior Member monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    hull, mass, USA.
    Posts
    5,379
    why???? I always find it interesting to call project..."builds"... what are we "building"? You mean putting a motorbike together?
    Some can put a bike together in a weekend... others fabricate their own parts. Whatever

    I am going to "build" a bicycle rack to organize my garage...
    Then maybe head to my shop to clean up and organize that space so I can work
    latered

Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. I want to build a BMW Cafe Racer
    By Macker in forum General
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-03-2014, 02:40 AM
  2. '80 GS 550 L Cafe Racer Build
    By Colorado CJ in forum Project Builds
    Replies: 143
    Last Post: 08-10-2011, 04:06 PM
  3. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-24-2009, 12:26 PM
  4. New CL350 Cafe - First Time Build Buget Build
    By kadavenport in forum Project Builds
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 04-10-2009, 02:41 PM
  5. How do I build a Cafe Racer?
    By pneuma in forum General
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-07-2005, 09:01 AM

Search tags for this page

average cafe racer osts

,

emgo venom on cb900f

,

how long does it take to cafe racer

,

time to build a cafe racer

,

typical cost to build cafe racer

Click on a term to search for related topics.