Very Important tool question. Plz Help!
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Very Important tool question. Plz Help!

This is a discussion on Very Important tool question. Plz Help! within the Ichiban Moto forums, part of the Vendors category; Hi Ichiban, I have an important tool question for you. I've been riding over 25 years now and like you, I always insist on using ...

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  1. #1
    Junior Member rider123's Avatar
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    Very Important tool question. Plz Help!

    Hi Ichiban,

    I have an important tool question for you. I've been riding over 25 years now and like you, I always insist on using the right tool for the job with the highest possible quality tools available. For my Chinese 2005 Suzuki Bandit 1200 it's a no-brainer because it's a Chinese bike I can use all the "China Standard" high quality tools available. However my friend and I were fishing in the wetlands just outside of Oshawa, Ontario and boy did we find a gem! It looks like we found an ancient 1998 Harley-Davidson Sportster 883 that someone abandoned in a swamp! The thing is mucky, but due to the low oxygen content in the mud surrounding the swamp it's almost in perfect condition, just a minor amount of surface rust. The engine doesn't turn when we pushed it, but my friend who owns a motorcycle shop whom I was fishing with says that's a very minor problem that can be fixed usually in 5 mins or less with some lawnmower pistons from a junkyard. But here is the problem. Since Canada is metric we are lucky and have access to a wide variety of high quality "china standard" motorcycle tools, but him being a mechanic and all said that because it's a British bike, china standard tools may not work. He says that the tools are measured in miles not the standard Chinese units. I've tried to source these "miles British tools" from all my favorite motorcycle repair shops such as "Wallmart" and "Target" to no avail. I even went so far as to be prepared to pay the extra amount and go down and have a talk with the checkout lady at the upscale "Dollar-Rama" motorcycle supply shop as she is usually an expert on the "china standard" motorcycle tools(though a bit pricey) and she actually has heard of "miles British tools" but didn't know when they would get them in stock. I did a little searching on the googlenet and I saw a forum post where someone took a high quality "china standard" motorcycle assembly lock-grips and "converted" them to be used with the British system.

    My idea is to buy a second set of "china standard" tools and convert them to British miles units. Then what I can do is attach a Chinese set of lock-grips onto the "converted" British set. Do you think this will work? The beauty of this system is that if I have to go back to fix my Chinese bike all I have to do is unlock the Chinese set from the British set. My motorcycle mechanic friend has also shown interest as it may save time because all he has to do is buy only one more entire set of tools and "convert" them for British use. Are there any safety issues with using this system? I can see by your videos that you are very safety conscious which is a refreshing change as other motorcycle repair videos I've watched I can tell that they are not safe at all as they rarely use the red high strength Kevlar ziptie, only the green medium strength. I would also like to know how many holes you can drill in the frame and still be safe. Dragging it out of the swamp was a big chore and it seems these British bikes use a lot more steel and paper-mache than seems necessary than the Chinese ones. I think I could shave off alot of weight by drilling some holes into the frame to lighten it. On googlenet they had an old video of a Mosquito fighter plane from WWII that the video claimed was built by the British(yeah right it's obviously Pakistani) that had a whole bunch of holes drilled into the frame. I was going to use this as a template as obviously Britain was a colony of Pakistan at one time and the British must have stolen their technology. Please help me get the old badass Brit on the road!

    Your loyal fan,

    rider123
    Last edited by rider123; 04-27-2015 at 05:36 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member TCed's Avatar
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    Are the walleye biting?

  3. #3
    Senior Member TrialsRider's Avatar
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    :I put that bike there 1n 1998 to plug a big hole in the swamp, you better put it back before the freakin swamp goes dry and the department of lands & forests comes looking for it.

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  5. #4
    Junior Member Leatherboy's Avatar
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    Rider123 forgot to mention that I have a pile of aftermarket badass electrical parts ready for installation, but we are not sure if they are 12,6 or 24 volt.
    Do we need special safety goggles or anything? when working with high voltage power?

  6. #5
    Junior Member rider123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leatherboy View Post
    Rider123 forgot to mention that I have a pile of aftermarket badass electrical parts ready for installation, but we are not sure if they are 12,6 or 24 volt.
    Do we need special safety goggles or anything? when working with high voltage power?
    I believe 24 volt is Mexican standard. I think you need a sombrero and a leather poncho in case of sparks, as well as safety goggles due to the higher voltage. Also I would put an extra layer of motorcycle assembly tape on your gloves. Be sure that it's the grey motorcycle assembly tape not the grey automotive assembly tape which will NOT WORK. Maybe ask the cashier at your local motorcycle supply store to show you the difference so you get the right type, ie Canadian Tire, Wallmart, etc. and be sure to specify the motorcycle brand. If you need to weld I find it best if you put the GREEN Kevlar zipties to pre-weld the part to the bike. The reason I use green is that it's only medium strength so you can fine position the part by sliding where you need it to go then just weld over the ziptie. If you use the red you may permanently affix the part to your bike before you're ready and have to use a blowtorch to "un-weld" the part off your bike, it can get messy.
    Last edited by rider123; 04-27-2015 at 10:57 PM.

  7. #6
    Junior Member rider123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrialsRider View Post
    :I put that bike there 1n 1998 to plug a big hole in the swamp, you better put it back before the freakin swamp goes dry and the department of lands & forests comes looking for it.
    Oh no so that's what that gurgling sound was. It's ok I have a Nigerian "mini-cafe" parts bike, a Vespa. I can just put some more paper-mache affixed with the RED kevlar zipties for strength. I doubt even the thousands and thousands of gallons of an entire swamp is strong enough to break anything affixed with a red Kevlar ziptie. That should plug the hole. Now that I'm looking at this bike we pulled out. Are there supposed to be that many spokes on the tires? Would it give better handling if I knocked a few off to decrease weight? I don't know just looking at all those spokes gives me a headache and confuses me and I also like that minimalist badass cafe look. Lean and mean is how I like it. I've already chopped the ends of the muffler off as per instructions from the googlenet. It's supposed to give me an extra 15 horsepower. Can't wait to get to the junkyard and pick up some pistons and hear this baby roar!
    Last edited by rider123; 04-27-2015 at 11:06 PM.

  8. #7
    Junior Member Leatherboy's Avatar
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    Here is a pic of the pegs, currently they are set up as highway pegs but I think we can turn them upside down for some KiCKASS rearsets
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    Last edited by Leatherboy; 04-28-2015 at 09:46 AM.

  9. #8
    Junior Member rider123's Avatar
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    Those highway/rearsets will be badass!! But the person who did the job before obviously wasn't safe. I don't see a minimum of one red ziptie which is the required Ministry of Transport standards for motorcycle accessories. Maybe it was a German bike?(a VTWIN? sounds German) I hear the German bikes have less safety standards than the Chinese or British bikes and aren't as fast. If you get stopped by the police, a red max strength ziptie on all the accessories is what they look for. I would make sure your MOT compliant before taking it on the road, you don't want to get a ticket. I believe in some States of the U.S. you can get away with just a green ziptie, but best be safe than sorry. In fact I would even go better and seal the ziptie against rust by sealing it in with a Bic Ballpoint gluestick. Remember when using the gluestick to use the motorcycle welding specific CARDBOARD matches not a welding lighter. The lighter is too hard to control and many used for automotive repair, it may not work properly and you'll get unsightly scoring on the ziptie which will make you look like a poser and not a badass.
    Last edited by rider123; 04-28-2015 at 03:45 PM.

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    Banned Witworth's Avatar
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    You need a Witworth spanner: one size fits all.

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  11. #10
    Banned pwalo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rider123 View Post
    Hi Ichiban,

    I have an important tool question for you. I've been riding over 25 years now and like you, I always insist on using the right tool for the job with the highest possible quality tools available. For my Chinese 2005 Suzuki Bandit 1200 it's a no-brainer because it's a Chinese bike I can use all the "China Standard" high quality tools available. However my friend and I were fishing in the wetlands just outside of Oshawa, Ontario and boy did we find a gem! It looks like we found an ancient 1998 Harley-Davidson Sportster 883 that someone abandoned in a swamp! The thing is mucky, but due to the low oxygen content in the mud surrounding the swamp it's almost in perfect condition, just a minor amount of surface rust. The engine doesn't turn when we pushed it, but my friend who owns a motorcycle shop whom I was fishing with says that's a very minor problem that can be fixed usually in 5 mins or less with some lawnmower pistons from a junkyard. But here is the problem. Since Canada is metric we are lucky and have access to a wide variety of high quality "china standard" motorcycle tools, but him being a mechanic and all said that because it's a British bike, china standard tools may not work. He says that the tools are measured in miles not the standard Chinese units. I've tried to source these "miles British tools" from all my favorite motorcycle repair shops such as "Wallmart" and "Target" to no avail. I even went so far as to be prepared to pay the extra amount and go down and have a talk with the checkout lady at the upscale "Dollar-Rama" motorcycle supply shop as she is usually an expert on the "china standard" motorcycle tools(though a bit pricey) and she actually has heard of "miles British tools" but didn't know when they would get them in stock. I did a little searching on the googlenet and I saw a forum post where someone took a high quality "china standard" motorcycle assembly lock-grips and "converted" them to be used with the British system.

    My idea is to buy a second set of "china standard" tools and convert them to British miles units. Then what I can do is attach a Chinese set of lock-grips onto the "converted" British set. Do you think this will work? The beauty of this system is that if I have to go back to fix my Chinese bike all I have to do is unlock the Chinese set from the British set. My motorcycle mechanic friend has also shown interest as it may save time because all he has to do is buy only one more entire set of tools and "convert" them for British use. Are there any safety issues with using this system? I can see by your videos that you are very safety conscious which is a refreshing change as other motorcycle repair videos I've watched I can tell that they are not safe at all as they rarely use the red high strength Kevlar ziptie, only the green medium strength. I would also like to know how many holes you can drill in the frame and still be safe. Dragging it out of the swamp was a big chore and it seems these British bikes use a lot more steel and paper-mache than seems necessary than the Chinese ones. I think I could shave off alot of weight by drilling some holes into the frame to lighten it. On googlenet they had an old video of a Mosquito fighter plane from WWII that the video claimed was built by the British(yeah right it's obviously Pakistani) that had a whole bunch of holes drilled into the frame. I was going to use this as a template as obviously Britain was a colony of Pakistan at one time and the British must have stolen their technology. Please help me get the old badass Brit on the road!

    Your loyal fan,

    rider123
    Hi Ichiban and rider123.

    Living in the Divided States of Britain I have come across many of these British standard tools at flea markets and yard sales. As they are practically worthless you can usually pick up a roll cab full for about 12 pesos.

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    Because Britain went on to the metric system in the sixties; the mechanics at the time who worked in inches found they could not just lay their hands on the right spanner just by glancing at the nut, productivity slowed to a halt and they almost became extinct. Now that the surviving mechanics of the era are shuffling off this mortal coil the best of these old timers tools are now appearing in charity shops and garage clearances.

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    That is where I stumbled across these "dead mans tools". After hauling them back to the workshop I did a bit of googling on the old confuser and, after a bit of research, I found out that I'd stumbled across some very rare prototype Yorkshire standard spanners and sockets. In the sixties a toolmaker from Sheffield bought into a Birmingham company called Britool who invented the whole inches system (although there is still some philosophical debate as to which came first; the spanner or the nut).

    General Metal and Holloware

    One night whilst working in the research and development shed, off his tits on highly sugared tea and good sixties acid, Alfred Flatcap invented a new unit of measurement called the Fathom (equal to one Yorkshireman in length). After days of research and when he finally came down off the acid he approached the gaffer with the idea and the go ahead was given to build a few prototype sets of tools. They produced spanners and sockets in sizes from just a few microfathoms all the way up to half a fathom (for ship engines I think) which took eight men to lift. The material they were made of is still unknown but they never tarnish and when you put them close to your ear they emit a low throbbing hum. Rumour had it that they were a dense alloy made from elements found at the heart of neutron stars. All I know is that they are very sturdy with a weighty heft in the hand.

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    They were set to completely revolutionise the mechanical industry but unfortunately Japan had invented the JS metric system and were kicking everyones arses with motorcycles because they weren't allowed to make guns or sharp objects after behaving badly during WW2. Because the hipsters of the day all started buying reliable Japanese bikes the UK motorcycle industry collapsed and Alf's revolutionary tooling went the way of the Betamax video. As a result the economy collapsed and the Japanese' peaceful conquering of Britain was complete. They kicked our arses fair and square and Britain had to give up it's bizarre pounds shillings and pence system and go onto the Japanese standard metric monetary system.

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    The set I came across is incomplete and ranges in size from thirty microfathoms up to two hundred and fifty microfathoms. They seem to fit all Brit bikes including Harleys and Cossacks and are useful for hammering onto rounded Chinesium alloy nuts when all else fails. Due to the set being incomplete I managed to haggle the seller down to three strips of rhubarb and a ferret (Yorkshire has been on a barter economy since it's demotion to fourth world status after the 2008 financial crash) If I come across another set I will buy them for you and you can have them for the price of postage I weighed mine this evening and what you see in the pictures comes in at around seventy three metric tonnes. I shall go to the post office in the morning and find out how many 26p stamps you'll have to buy to get them over to the good old yoo ess of A.

    How's the Harley coming along by the way? I showed some pictures of it to a German mate of mine and he said it looked more like an old Gullenpumpe to him. I shall look them up on the interwebs and see if there is one that looks like yours.

    Best of luck with the build, Yours as sincerely as I can be with tears streaming down my face,

    Pwalo.

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