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Crawl, Walk, Run or is it Crawl then Run.

This is a discussion on Crawl, Walk, Run or is it Crawl then Run. within the NEW MEMBERS READ HERE! forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; Hey guys and gals. Names Edward and I just purchased a 2015 SR400. This is actually my very first motorcycle ever. I have been working ...

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Thread: Crawl, Walk, Run or is it Crawl then Run.

  1. #1
    Junior Member Mr.Lopez's Avatar
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    Crawl, Walk, Run or is it Crawl then Run.

    Hey guys and gals.

    Names Edward and I just purchased a 2015 SR400. This is actually my very first motorcycle ever. I have been working on cars since I was 8 with my grandfather, to the point where we fully restored a 64.5 Mustang. Im currently just cruising around town, getting used to the bike before any real modifications. Been lurking on this site for a few months and decided it was time to join.

    Have mechanical experience with cars, but very little with bikes. Almost no fab skills whatsoever. Thanks for looking. Only good pic of bike so far. Name:  Snapchat-2696786897349135892.jpg
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Geeto67's Avatar
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    Welcome. I like those new SR400s, I which they sold more of them.

    So Briefly here is my opinion of what is different about motorcycles from cars:

    Mechanical: Most stuff is pretty much the same. If you have worked on disc brakes on a car the same skills are applicable to bikes, except you can see the whole system and it is not assisted. However, unlike cars interchangeability is a bit more difficult since there are not generally industry standards outside of basic stuff like tires. you can't swap wheels like you can on a car for example, every bike has their own axle size and spacing. Modifying is also more interesting since things that apply to cars don't apply to motorcycles due to the dynamic of how motorcycles operate. For example lowering a car usually improves the handling in some way (provided your suspension geometry is good), but on bikes lowering a bike often does not improve handling. When approaching modifying the bike it pays to leverage the existing knowledge base for the bike as well as taking a install, test, revise approach. People that just blow motorcycles apart thinking they are going to ground up customize a bike having never done it before usually fail (not that you would do it with a new bike).

    Riding: There are a special set of skills as a new rider you need to develop. These include reading the road, being constantly situationally aware, riding defensively, committing to your decision making, etc... These are skills that don't often get a work out in a car, at least not to the level they do on a bike. Everything you do right now should be helping your skills development. this means no low bars with an uncomfortable riding position that encourages you to not check your mirrors and things like that. Doesn't mean your bike can't get better, just means don't start sacrificing your enjoyment of riding in furtherance of your need to look cool. Focus on the short comings and try to make them better. How do I get better brakes, better suspension, better visibility? these are the questions you should be asking right now. How do I get that sweet deus look should be the furthest thing from your mind.
    drgonzo, Mr.Lopez and 83XLX like this.
    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.
    - Samuel Beckett
    A tool is just an opportunity with a handle
    - Kevin Kelly

  3. #3
    Senior Member TrialsRider's Avatar
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    It's beautiful!
    keep it complete, keep it clean, keep it serviced and ride lots.
    drgonzo, Mr.Lopez and kerosene like this.

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  5. #4
    Junior Member Mr.Lopez's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input guys! Yes I will be keeping all stock for the time being. The idea behind purchasing this bike in particular was something more rider-oriented then mechanically oriented. If that makes any sense. Plus, my grandfather apparently had one in the early 80s, which he might have loved more than my grandmother at that point in time, but who am I to judge right. Thanks for the input. I am actually getting some pretty decent seat time. A couple hours at least every day, just to practice and learn my bike.
    Geeto67 and TrialsRider like this.

  6. #5
    Senior Member TrialsRider's Avatar
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    Your Grandfather had one in the early 80's :| That long ago eh,

    thanks for making me feel really old
    Mr.Lopez likes this.

  7. #6
    Senior Member 83XLX's Avatar
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    Early '80s...It was probably an SR500, then.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Stephen J's Avatar
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    I like it. That's a smart lookin ride right there. Good size, looks comfortable, big enough to pull you along quite well I would imagine. Enjoy, stay safe.
    If you can't pick it back up, don't ride it.

  9. #8
    Senior Member thechief86's Avatar
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    That's the best choice I know of for a first bike. Kick start only really forces you to understand at least a little bit about how the thing works. Not to mention in my opinion those are the prettiest bikes yamaha sells new at the moment.
    It's not quite as tall as the sr500 I've ridden, but I actually think that is a good thing for someone new to the hobby.
    If you maintain that bike and don't run it as its limit everywhere you go, it will carry you for many, many years.
    It can probably handle a lot of hard running, but maxxed out on the freeway for several hundred miles will likely wear it out prematurely.
    I'd love to have one, though, even after 15 years of riding, the little bikes are still great, relaxing fun.
    It ain't easy bein' fat and greasy.

  10. #9
    Junior Member Mr.Lopez's Avatar
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    Hey Guys so I have been riding the bike around for about a week or so, and have noticed that the bike sits a little too high for my comfort. After countless hours of searching online and the owners manuals, I have not found a way to lower it just a tad bit. Im not looking to alter suspension by any means, just trying to adjust it a little to have it perfect. Are there any suggestions that you would recommend?

  11. #10
    Senior Member Geeto67's Avatar
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    cut an inch out of the seat foam.
    TrialsRider likes this.
    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.
    - Samuel Beckett
    A tool is just an opportunity with a handle
    - Kevin Kelly

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