Howdy and my Honda Dream!
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Howdy and my Honda Dream!

This is a discussion on Howdy and my Honda Dream! within the Project Builds forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; Howdy all! This, being my first post, is going to be a self introduction as well as my bike introduction! (Not sure if my bike ...

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  1. #1
    Junior Member Nakazoto's Avatar
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    Howdy and my Honda Dream!

    Howdy all!
    This, being my first post, is going to be a self introduction as well as my bike introduction! (Not sure if my bike is technically a cafe racer, but I like to think of it as one!)

    My name's Dave and I'm actually a huge classic Japanese car aficionado. I currently own five cars (1967 Mitsubishi 360, 1971 Fairlady Z, 1973 Isuzu Bellet, 1988 300ZX SS, 1991 March Super Turbo). I tend to fall in love with the more rustier ones and slowly coerce them back to life.

    I've always been a huge fan of motorcycles, but never had the guts or confidence to buy one and get my license. That didn't stop me from riding on the occasion (learned on a CL350 Scrambler, then rode my brother's CX500 quite a bit). Then I moved to Japan and was presented with an interesting option. Anything under 50 ccs here can be ridden legally on just a driver's license. This meant I could get my sea legs back, get comfortable riding and then shoot for a real license. Which left me with the trick decision of deciding what bike to get. I flirted the idea of an old Yamaha YB-1, but realized they were far too small a frame for me (I'm a tall dude). After looking around, I realized I really only had one choice. So this past February, I took the plunge and picked this up!



    Sorry for the blurry picture (there are clearer pictures down below). This would be a Honda Dream 50. So, what exactly is a Dream 50? Well, it's a bike that Honda built in 1997 as a tribute to the old CR110 racer that competed in the 50 cc gran prix. The Dream comes with the world's smallest mass produced twin cam, 4-valve engine! It has a proper 5-speed transmission, discs up front and in the back (with a twin piston caliper up front) and an engine that rev's to 11 grand out of the box. It only makes about 6 horsepower, but that's actually enough to run this thing up to about 80 kph, which is screaming for a 50!



    So, I actually picked the bike up in Okazaki, which is about 45 minutes from here. I was going to ride it home, but since I hadn't ridden a bike in over two years, I was naturally a bit nervous, haha.



    ]

    Fortunately, everything went buttery smooth! I initially got the bike as just a learners bike, but it quickly grew on me! However, I can't leave well enough alone. I really wanted to kill the side covers and air box. This meant I needed to kill the battery too, which is fine as the bike is kick start and runs without a battery. However, without something to smooth out the output from the stator it ran very poorly, not to mention the electronic tacho didn't function at all. The answer? Capacitance, and a lot of it.





    That's six 4,700 uF 50V capacitors soldered in parallel. That's actually enough capacitance to keep the neutral LED illuminated for a solid 45 seconds after the engine is shut off. Not bad!

    I was also planning on ditching the rear fender for a much cleaner look as well.



    In the rear fender's place, I wanted to put in a nice plate to shield the bottom of the seat, electronics and carb from road grime. A good fender eliminator kit is about 8,000 yen on Yahoo Japan, so I figured I could do better. So for about 1,000 yen I picked up a nice large piece of aluminum. I then mocked up what I wanted with a piece of cardboard and then transferred the measurements over.



    I stuffed the capacitors up in the small area just behind the seat (unfortunately didn't nab a picture of that), built up a simple bracket for the brake light and license plate and bolted it all in!





    Interestingly though, by killing the airbox, the engine became completely unusable below 8,000 rpm. I knew that just the airbox alone couldn't be responsible for this, so, naturally, it was time for a carb clean and a new plug!







    New Iridium plug!



    This made the engine much easier to use! There's still nothing below about 5 grand, but keep it above that and it pulls clean and hard all the way 13,500! Then, on the last weekend of the Sakura bloom, I pulled my Mitsubishi out and my girlfriend and I got all dressed up for some fun pictures with two of my toys!



    This one is just of the Mitsubishi, but I thought it was a good picture, haha.



    Back to the bike!











    Since these pictures I've put new tires on it, rebuilt the front and rear calipers and dropped in brand new pads. I got some other goodies planned for it as well (carb, pipes, 15,000 rpm, etc.), so I definitely plan on keeping y'all updated on the progress!

    Thank you guys for looking!
    Cheers
    David
    Tons of cars, but only one bike... for now.

  2. #2
    Senior Member dielectric's Avatar
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    quote:Originally posted by Nakazoto

    Interestingly though, by killing the airbox, the engine became completely unusable below 8,000 rpm. I knew that just the airbox alone couldn't be responsible for this, so, naturally, it was time for a carb clean and a new plug!



    This made the engine much easier to use! There's still nothing below about 5 grand, but keep it above that and it pulls clean and hard all the way 13,500!
    I've only seen a Dream 50 in a museum, cool to see one out and about. I really have a thing for old GP technology.

    As far as the total lack of bottom end, it certainly does have to do with the airbox mod. See that long, long tube that you removed from the filter-side of the carb? Just for giggles, put it back in place of the pod filter and go for a spin.
    Dictated but not read.

  3. #3
    Senior Member bmartin's Avatar
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    I remember my days in Japan back in the early 70's... I wish I had shipped more bikes back with me.
    Bob - Palmyra NY
    2 - 69 CB750, 1 Turbo
    1 - 71 CB750

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  5. #4
    Senior Member jaguar's Avatar
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    very cool bike. Wish that you could ride them on the road here.

    I kinda like it better with the side covers.
    What are you going to do about the tabs and other stuff inside the triangle?
    I am Derby\'s Bitch


    Some times things come around that are so singularly inept it gives you a whole new appreciation for the ept

  6. #5
    Administrator texmawby's Avatar
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    Just for giggles, put it back in place of the pod filter and go for a spin.

    i'd say....just for giggles, remove what looks to be a very cheap pod filter.

    emgo's in the trash!

    tex
    advocate for the injured, disabled, and urinated upon.

  7. #6
    Moderator imslow's Avatar
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    I owned two of those. One red frame and one black frame. Just curious, what did you pay for it in US Dollars?
    Inertial dynos just make people cranky

  8. #7
    Senior Member TheGreg's Avatar
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    i like it better the way you bought it.
    ask me about my ADD or pie or my cat. a dog. i have a bike. Do you like TV? i saw a rock. hi.

  9. #8
    Junior Member Nakazoto's Avatar
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    quote:Originally posted by dielectric



    I've only seen a Dream 50 in a museum, cool to see one out and about. I really have a thing for old GP technology.

    As far as the total lack of bottom end, it certainly does have to do with the airbox mod. See that long, long tube that you removed from the filter-side of the carb? Just for giggles, put it back in place of the pod filter and go for a spin.
    Thanks for the reply! Interestingly, the lack of total bottom end was with the long velocity stack on the carb. I left it on at first because I knew that removing it would move the powerband away from the bottom end. The biggest problem was that with the airbox on, it was pulling air in through a convoluted hole no bigger than a quarter. With the airbox gone, it was suddenly flowing so much air into the carb that the slow jet couldn't keep up. A good clean and some adjustments made it a bit better, and then adjusting the needle in the carb to give me a richer overall setting allows the main jet to come in much earlier, making the bike way, way more streetable (but still retaining that wicked top end).

    Surprisingly, when I took the stack off, I didn't notice a huge change!

    quote:Originally posted by jaguar



    very cool bike. Wish that you could ride them on the road here.

    I kinda like it better with the side covers.
    What are you going to do about the tabs and other stuff inside the triangle?
    Thanks for the reply!
    I was actually going for the HRC Dream 50R look, like the bike pictured below. That's why I removed the side covers. I was thinking of painting the tabs black. I would like to retain the ability to completely revert the bike to stock if it so struck me. The red tabs are no where near as intrusive looking in the flesh, but I would like to make them a little more incognito, haha.


    Tons of cars, but only one bike... for now.

  10. #9
    Junior Member Nakazoto's Avatar
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    quote:Originally posted by imslow

    I owned two of those. One red frame and one black frame. Just curious, what did you pay for it in US Dollars?
    Thanks for the reply! I paid about 250,000 yen for it when I got it, which according to google is about 3,100 USD. A little pricey for a bike, but that's actually pretty cheap for a Dream these days. Also, it was within riding distance of my place, which made the decision so much easier to make, haha.

    So I bought some supplies for the garage the other day, got back home, stepped in and in the dark, I noticed something moving. I looked down and this bad boy slithered past my feet and under one of the Bellet seats!



    I canít stand snakes! After I turned into a little girl, and hid on top of my Bellet for a little while, we finally corralled him into a box and set him free in the field across the street. Spiders, cockroaches, rats, anything but snakes and Iím completely blasť, snakes thoughÖ

    With that out of the way, it was time to get down to work! I didnít particularly like my old fender eliminator plate. I cut some cutouts for the brackets and stuff, but if the plate didnít have a curve to it then the cutouts werenít needed. Here you can see the cutouts and the curve of the old plate.



    This was also the first time I have had the tank off, so I figured I would take a picture of what life under that tank was like. Appears to be the CDI, a bit of wiring and thatís about it, haha.



    After much cutting, hammering, bending and sanding this was the plate before I cleaned it up for installation on the bike.



    And here it is cleaned up and installed on the bike! I think it looks much, much better!





    From the side the new plate is almost completely invisible.



    I also figured it was time to pull my capacitor pack out, ditch the circuit board it was on and wrap it in tape so it was more compact and battery like. I wanted to make sure that it was held together strongly with solder and wires first though. So after much soldering, this was the end result. Nice and strong!



    Completely wrapped up in tape with a piece of rubber covering the terminals of the capacitors and mounted in the back of the seat.



    Clearance is tight, but it fits without hitting or rubbing. I think Iíll put a piece of foam on top of the red tab though just to make sure everything is held in place properly.



    I did all the above work because I was waiting on some new parts. Chief among which were these new pipes! A genuine set of Moriwaki performance pipes!



    I also had a PC20 carb on order as well. The extra 5mm of carb size should make a noticeable difference!



    I got excited and went for the carb first. I didnít get a snap, but the outlet of the new carb versus the old carb is completely different. I thought I would have to port the intake manifold (hard to call it a manifold as itís just a short pipe with two flanges) but it turns out that itís designed for a 20 mm carb from the go. The old carb was just choked down and two small for the intake manifold! A simple bolt-on affair from there!



    I then busted out my grinder with wire wheel and stripped all the old paint off the new pipes. Then, after a bit of a sand down, I hung them up and sprayed htem with some 600 C high temp black paint.



    And here they are installed! They look bloody fantastic if you ask me!



    I fired the engine up with the new carb and pipes on and it sound like a completely different animal! It sounds like a 150 cc single! It should be an utter blast to ride!



    Thatís all for now. More to come soon though as I got a new CDI, new turn signals and a new tail light on order that should be showing up any day!

    Thanks again guys!
    Cheers
    Tons of cars, but only one bike... for now.

  11. #10
    Senior Member busapilot's Avatar
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    Welcome! Can't wait to read/see more.
    Every time I start thinking the world is all bad, then I start seeing people out there having a good time on motorcycles. It makes me take another look. - S.M.

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