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1979 GS750E did right

This is a discussion on 1979 GS750E did right within the Project Builds forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; No worries. Are you planning on using that tap you put the pic up of? Looks a little primitive is all. Is there a vac ...

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  1. #21
    Senior Member engel's Avatar
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    No worries. Are you planning on using that tap you put the pic up of?

    Looks a little primitive is all. Is there a vac port on your carbs? My early (kickstart equipped) gs 750 parts manual shows a vac diaphragm tap but this somewhat clearer pic from my gs thou shop manual gives you a manual on off type like that which you have now.



    options are there and unless you start making a shitload more power from the mill than it likely pumps now, i doubt you'll drain the bowls via lack of flow rate from the standard types in a hurry. Higher (sustained too) high speed touring on my 81 gsx1100 has never shown up a propensity of the tap to starve and thouh not race spec, when the chocks are pulled the big girl does slake her thirst pretty hard.

    i like the fibre type washers personally, copper doesn't appreciate reuse and aluminium less so.
    BFF of Ken, inheritor of same status with Tex, erstwhile defender of young Kerry, and general village idiot sans village. Glen.

  2. #22
    Senior Member hillsy's Avatar
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    And if you're worried about draining the bowls you can always just add a fuel pump:

    12V 80 LPH Fuel Pump for Honda CBR600F CBR600F2 CBR600F3 TRX350 1987 2000 Metal | eBay

  3. #23
    Senior Member CaTacL1sm's Avatar
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    I guess this raises the question, is there some huge benefit of a vacuum petcock vs standard?
    Quote Originally Posted by alwhite00 View Post
    Fuck all of you guys. Get into your little circle jerk and have fun. Thought this may be a pretty cool message board but damn, you guys are assholes.

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  5. #24
    Banned Witworth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaTacL1sm View Post
    I guess this raises the question, is there some huge benefit of a vacuum petcock vs standard?
    Not really, its just for people too lazy to turn the gas off.

    Guys often remove them, because when they fail and leak, they can wreck motors. Like on CBX1000's.

    Danger, is my business."

  6. #25
    Senior Member CaTacL1sm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Witworth View Post
    Not really, its just for people too lazy to turn the gas off.

    Guys often remove them, because when they fail and leak, they can wreck motors. Like on CBX1000's.

    Danger, is my business."
    just what i thought.
    Quote Originally Posted by alwhite00 View Post
    Fuck all of you guys. Get into your little circle jerk and have fun. Thought this may be a pretty cool message board but damn, you guys are assholes.

  7. #26
    Senior Member Cyorg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaTacL1sm View Post
    I guess this raises the question, is there some huge benefit of a vacuum petcock vs standard?
    If you have a vacuum petcock it can shut the fuel supply off in the case of fire either by the engine stalling or you hitting the kill switch (no more vacuum), which gives you a few more seconds to deal with the fire without extra fuel or fuck off. Honda introduced them around the time of the CBX intro. If a float stuck and the bike was parked on the side stand and the tap was left on, fuel would drain through the fuel crossover tubes and fill # 1 cylinder. Depending on where the piston was sitting on #1, in relation to the compression stroke, it could hydraulic and bend a rod. A few of the early ones did it, so Honda updated them with vacuum fuel taps. Still good practice to turn off the tap.
    Last edited by Cyorg; 02-09-2015 at 07:14 PM.

  8. #27
    Senior Member MK3Brent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaTacL1sm View Post
    I guess this raises the question, is there some huge benefit of a vacuum petcock vs standard?
    I love vacuum petcocks. Haven't had a problem in any of mine minus the ZRX. (those are known for leaking though, simple fix.)

    The one in my GS750E is original... still holds. ymmv

    '82 GS750E, '99 ZRX-1100
    "Tossing a few cherries on the manure wagon doesn't make it the dessert cart."

  9. #28
    Banned Witworth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyorg View Post
    If you have a vacuum petcock it can shut the fuel supply off in the case of fire either by the engine stalling or you hitting the kill switch (no more vacuum), which gives you a few more seconds to deal with the fire without extra fuel or fuck off. Honda introduced them around the time of the CBX intro. If a float stuck and the bike was parked on the side stand and the tap was left on, fuel would drain through the fuel crossover tubes and fill # 1 cylinder. Depending on where the piston was sitting on #1, in relation to the compression stroke, it could hydraulic and bend a rod. A few of the early ones did it, so Honda updated them with vacuum fuel taps. Still good practice to turn off the tap.
    Kind of. It's a far better practice to remove the CBX vac tap and throw it away. It's not a major thing to remove the vac tap, its separate from the gas tap itself. You can't rely on the vac tap to protect your motor from filling up the cases with fuel. Just turn the fuel tap off, then you are reassured you are protecting your motor from having the crankcases filling up with gas. And yes that can happen.

    Danger, is my business."

  10. #29
    Senior Member CaTacL1sm's Avatar
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    Productive Week:

    Name:  IMAG1630.jpg
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    Got progressive front and rears, fork seals, front and rear all balls wheel bearings, all balls steering stem bearings, fuel filter and some other minor things.

    Rebuilt the rear caliper and master cylinder, fixed the leaky petcock, and repaired the headlight switch a few days ago.

    did the forks today...

    Name:  IMAG1626.jpg
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    Name:  IMAG1628.jpg
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    By the looks of the dust boots, the rusty mess that used to be the retaining ring, and the seals that were frozen solid to the forks, as well as the grey ooze that was fork oil, I don't think this has been serviced in a while. I went with 20wt oil and preloaded the springs 1/2" to start. Ordered new retaining rings and dust boots today too, so those should be here some time this week.
    As soon as those come in I'll be able to button up the front end.

    After that I just need to install the rear wheel bearing and she'll be rolling again.

    Things to do this week:
    -Change the oil
    -Change front and rear brake fluids
    -Safety wire everything back down

    One question: the bike came with a steering damper. the mounts were on the left fork leg, just below the bottom triple as well as on the frame tube. I installed the damper to the mounts and the damper reaches its end before the tree hits the steering stops (and yes I tried adjusting the damper). Is this how it's supposed to work or do I need a longer damper?
    Quote Originally Posted by alwhite00 View Post
    Fuck all of you guys. Get into your little circle jerk and have fun. Thought this may be a pretty cool message board but damn, you guys are assholes.

  11. #30
    Senior Member hillsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaTacL1sm View Post


    One question: the bike came with a steering damper. the mounts were on the left fork leg, just below the bottom triple as well as on the frame tube. I installed the damper to the mounts and the damper reaches its end before the tree hits the steering stops (and yes I tried adjusting the damper). Is this how it's supposed to work or do I need a longer damper?
    Throw up some pics. I'd imagine there would be some way to mount it so it doesn't hit the stops on the damper (maybe spin the clamp on the fork leg?).

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