'74 CL125S – The UNINTENTIONAL 2nd Project! - Page 4
Close

'74 CL125S – The UNINTENTIONAL 2nd Project!

This is a discussion on '74 CL125S – The UNINTENTIONAL 2nd Project! within the Project Builds forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; The last week or so, I've been thinking to myself that simply getting something akin to a brand-new version of the CL — with bright, ...

Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 73
Like Tree19Likes

Thread: '74 CL125S – The UNINTENTIONAL 2nd Project!

  1. #31
    Senior Member Tanshanomi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,784
    The last week or so, I've been thinking to myself that simply getting something akin to a brand-new version of the CL — with bright, 12V lights, a disc brake and generally less troublesome condition — would be nice. My local Kymco scooter shop had just gotten their first K-Pipe 125 in stock, so I went by to check it out yesterday. I'm not sure what I think of it. It has 17" wheels and a slightly taller seat than a Grom or a Z125, but the wheelbase is not much longer (within 2 inches of the Grom's, IIRC), which left it feeling like a BMX bike. There's not much motorcycle in front of you. The brake and shift pedals had noticeably kludgy construction, but other than that there were few places it didn't look up to Japanese standards. The really weird thing is that instead of the standard 1-N-2-3-4 shift pattern, it's four down (4-3-2-1-N). In the rest of the world the K-Pipe has an auto-clutch, so even though the U.S. version specifies a manual clutch with a lever, it retains the goofy shift pattern. Unlike the Grom, TU250, and others, it is definitely old school with a carb, manual choke and manual petcock. It does have electric starting and the choke lever is integrated into the handlebar controls.

    While I haven't ruled it out, it feels a bit tiny and slightly toy-like. Unfortunately, there isn't anything other than CVT scooters anywhere in its price range. A Sym Wolf 150 or Honda Grom cost half-again more than the K-Pipe's $1995 price. Once you get to three grand, it doesn't feel like a big jump to four, where there are much more substantial choices such as the CB300F, TU250X, and GW250 Inazuma. Maybe it's worth putting the effort into the CL125 after all.
    Last edited by Tanshanomi; 08-07-2017 at 01:06 PM.

  2. #32
    Senior Member Tanshanomi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,784
    I haven't updated this in a long time, but I still have the bike, and it's still not completely roadworthy. The big issue was an electrical problem that I just couldn't figure out. I was having lighting issues that I traced down to left-side handlebar switch unit. I also needed a new throttle, because the original internal-cable twistgrip was sticking, so I bought all new generic switches, handlebar levers and throttle off Ebay. The functions of the switches didn't match up exactly to the originals, and they had a few extra wires, so I spent time trying to figure it out. No matter what I did, I couldn't get the headlight to come reliably, even though the handlebar switch was brand new and bench-tested perfectly. So, since replacing the switch unit didn't solve the problem, it had to be somewhere else, right? I traced wires all over the bike, repeatedly, trying to figure out the issue, with no luck. I ended up giving up and pushing the thing into a corner of the garage in defeat and leaving it there for many months. I concluded that I was just too stupid to fix it.

    Well, last Saturday morning I started over, troubleshooting from scratch. I then discovered the bizarre reality of the situation. It was so unlikely a scenario that I once I discovered it, I didn't feel nearly so stupid.


  3. #33
    Senior Member Tanshanomi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,784
    IT LIVES! Having just come back from a cruise through my neighborhood, I can report with some excitement that my ’74 Honda CL125S is officially back on the road. I haven’t ridden the bike hardly all since first getting it running two years ago. When I last posted, my a shakedown run 14 months ago revealed a multitude of electrical and carburetion issues, thanks to years of neglect and some stupidly executed “fixes” by a previous owner. Also, the third used, replacement Honda speedometer I’d purchased lasted about a quarter mile before its insides exploded. My original intention to keep it as stock as possible was finally abandoned completely, because the original Honda versions of the original parts were all either 1) impossible to find or, 2) obscenely expensive. The instruments, turn signals, switchgear, handlebar levers, and throttle have now been replaced with non-OE parts, removing nearly everything from the rider’s view that reminded me of my first bike to start with. Unfortunately, after four decades of poorly executed patches and repairs by a string previous owners, the thing was a diagnostic quagmire. Add to the mix a mismatched selection of “universal fit” parts made in Indonesia, and things got unexpectedly complicated.



    First of all, I gave up and bought a new, generic mini "chopper" speedometer. Since the indicator lights were originally housed inside the speedometer, I also purchased a stand-alone idiot light panel originally from a Honda CB350 twin and swapped out the 12V bulbs for 6V. I need to strip my template paper off the bracket and either paint it flat black or give it a good buffing. (I'm leaning towards black, since shiny stuff can reflect the sun right back in the rider's eyes.) I also might relocate the speedometer a bit closer to the handlebars.



    The biggest hang-up was an electrical problem that I just couldn’t figure out, despite tracing it down to the left-side handlebar switch unit. I also needed to do something about the balky throttle twistgrip (Honda’s weird-alice internal cable design). Since the original swiches, levers and throttle were all integrated into cast metal housings, I bought all-new, generic switches, levers, and external throttle off Ebay. After installing them, no matter how I tried, I couldn't get the lights to work properly. After messing around with it in my free time over the course of several months, I finally concluded that I was just too stupid to fix it, pushed the thing into a corner of the garage in defeat, and left it there for most of 2017. Well, one Saturday morning last month I gave myself a pep talk and started over, troubleshooting from scratch. I then discovered the bizarre malfunction that I demonstrated in my previous post. Once I'd figured out that the replacement unit was bad, I ordered an Emgo universal switch pod. That ended up being a fairly straightforward installation last weekend.



    Meanwhile, I filled, charged, and installed a new 6-volt battery. Then, this morning before work, I hooked up the new throttle cable (actually intended for a TRX125 four-wheeler), rolled the bike out into the driveway, and give it a good kick. And another. And another. After enough kicks, I moved on to bump-starting. After numerous attempts and I had a good sweat going and it was clear that something was amiss. I pulled the spark plug and held it against the head as I kicked—no spark. Oh, crap, I had screwed up the wiring somewhere. Wait, I thought: the kill switch on this bike works by grounding the coil, not by disconnecting it. Could it be that easy? I switched the aftermarket kill switch to the “stop” position and give it another kick. My effort was met with a bright, blue spark.



    I reinstalled the spark plug and moments later the bike roared to life. I fiddled with the idle adjustment screw and soon she was ticking over evenly, something I had never been able to make happen with the old, sticky throttle. I took it out for a couple miles around the neighborhood and it ran flawlessly.

    Having the bike on the road doesn’t mean it's anywhere finished. The fuel cap still weeps slightly, the rear brake is only marginally effective, and the bike still needs a lot of cosmetic work including a real paint job. Unfortunately, so much time has passed since I finished the exhaust system that I’ll need to knock off some surface rust before I can shoot the pieces with high-temp flat black paint. I also need to play with the weight and volume of oil in the front forks and I might replace the somewhat dim turn signals with some better quality, brighter units. I haven't enough looked at the points.

    But regardless of what needs to be done, I'm thinking I might ride it the 25-mile round trip to work some day this week. That will be fun.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    CafeRacer.net
    Advertisements
     

  5. #34
    Senior Member Tanshanomi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,784

    '74 CL125S – The UNINTENTIONAL 2nd Project!



    Well THAT didn't go according to plan. Got a high-RPM miss on the way to work, then it wouldn't start after work. Kicked and bumped it with hardly a pop. Gave up, waiting for AAA. I've had cycle coverage for 8 years without using it, so I figure they owe me.
    Last edited by Tanshanomi; 08-14-2017 at 06:47 PM. Reason: Added photo

  6. #35
    Senior Member CaTacL1sm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Fort Knox, Kentucky
    Posts
    2,295
    damn money shift
    Quote Originally Posted by alwhite00 View Post
    Fuck all of you guys. Get into your little circle jerk and have fun. Thought this may be a pretty cool message board but damn, you guys are assholes.

  7. #36
    Senior Member Tanshanomi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,784

    '74 CL125S – The UNINTENTIONAL 2nd Project!

    I put a multimeter on the condenser; zero ohms. From the looks of it, it very well could be the original condenser from 43 years ago.

  8. #37
    Senior Member TrialsRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    5,417
    Quote Originally Posted by Tanshanomi View Post
    I put a multimeter on the condenser; zero ohms. From the looks of it, it very well could be the original condenser from 43 years ago.

    Probably is, but ohms is a measure of resistance and you are dealing with a capacitor :| A capacitor (which is probably made out of mostly paper) acts like a little tiny solid state battery, it holds an electrical charge up to but not exceeding it's threshold capacity hence the name capacitor and then it releases that electrical charge all at once or as needed. Measuring its resistance is not going to tell you much, it would be like measuring the resistance in a battery to see if it will hold a charge, you might get a reading but it means little to nothing to testing that component.
    Last edited by TrialsRider; 08-17-2017 at 07:46 AM.

  9. #38
    Senior Member Tanshanomi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,784
    Quote Originally Posted by TrialsRider View Post
    Probably is, but ohms is a measure of resistance and you are dealing with a capacitor :| A capacitor (which is probably made out of mostly paper) acts like a little tiny solid state battery, it holds an electrical charge up to but not exceeding it's threshold capacity hence the name capacitor and then it releases that electrical charge all at once or as needed. Measuring its resistance is not going to tell you much, it would be like measuring the resistance in a battery to see if it will hold a charge, you might get a reading but it means little to nothing to testing that component.
    My understanding was that when switched to the ohms setting, a multimeter uses battery power to force current through the circuit, and the resistance should increase as the capacitor charges. If it never rises from zero, it's not charging. Is this not correct?

  10. #39
    Senior Member Tanshanomi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,784
    Found this online, demonstrating the technique. (Jump to 45 seconds in, where he charges the capacitor with the multimeter)


  11. #40
    Senior Member TrialsRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    5,417
    He's proven the capacitor is acting like a capacitor, personally I just changed them out because they were a cheap part and that was the best way to troubleshoot the damn things :|
    Clean the points, clean the carb and kick the shit out of the thing a whole bunch to see what it does

Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. cl125s not running right
    By jaguar in forum Technical
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-24-2010, 10:20 AM
  2. cl125s 1974 very clean
    By jaguar in forum Bikes For Sale
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-14-2009, 06:24 PM

Search tags for this page

[keyword]

,

cl 125 headlight bulb

,

kymco kpipe cafe racer

Click on a term to search for related topics.