1993 BMW Boxer Oilhead R1100RS Cafe Racer Build - Page 3
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1993 BMW Boxer Oilhead R1100RS Cafe Racer Build

This is a discussion on 1993 BMW Boxer Oilhead R1100RS Cafe Racer Build within the Project Builds forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; What you’re looking at is the exhaust header mounting pin holes on the BMW R1100RS engine cylinder head. The engine as told by the guy ...

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Thread: 1993 BMW Boxer Oilhead R1100RS Cafe Racer Build

  1. #21
    Junior Member vaasmoto's Avatar
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    What you’re looking at is the exhaust header mounting pin holes on the BMW R1100RS engine cylinder head. The engine as told by the guy who sold it to me is from 2001 (Don’t know how confirm this). The pins seem to have been drilled out and one of the holes completely fallen apart. So now my pickle is how to get this sorted. I could opt out just to look for cylinder heads, which are in better shape, however, the guy told me, the cylinders apparently have been bored out to increase the power, so I guess the rings have been installed to match this. If I opt out to replace cylinder heads, that means I need to look for the heads in better shape, replace all the gaskets and deal with this “boring” situation. Other option is to install some kind of inserts in the drilled out holes and weld that cavity. From what I understand aluminium welding isn’t that easy to come by in London, UK… Then once welded, I would need, I guess to drill out and tap a new pin hole. Other side isn’t a better situation as it still has 2 snapped bolts inside and a failed attempt to drill out the third snapped bolt.

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  2. #22
    Junior Member vaasmoto's Avatar
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    Wanted to remove the oil cooler for easier access and possible re-location, so obviously the oil had to be drained. As I had the boxer low on the floor, could not find a low profile container, so had to raise the engine on something so that I could slip some sort of oil collecting dish underneath. Good that I had 2 colleagues come and help me after work. We hoisted the engine on this risqué make-shift stand and I was able to get the drain plug out. There suppose to be 3.75 litres of oil in the engine, however, I would say there’s 2 litres at most…

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  3. #23
    Senior Member Cyorg's Avatar
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    Laboratory? Ultrasonic bath? Autoclave? Pipette washer? Why are you farting around at home? Some decent aircraft paint stripper comes in handy at times... even for just removing stains and light oxidation off of aluminum parts. It a pain to deal with in an environmentally friendly fashion, but works amazing well if you can get the good stuff. Once washed and rinsed thoroughly, then a run through the dishwasher on the pot and pan cycle is recommended. Depending on what soap you use it may cause the alloy to oxidize (turn a little darker) a bit, which I sometimes prefer, but that's another story.

    What do you do in the lab?
    "Non urinat in ventum"

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  5. #24
    Senior Member woodsman's Avatar
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    Do you have a scope you could in the spark plug hole and take a look at the cylinders. Corrosion in the header port isn't that unusual, at least not in Ontario.

  6. #25
    Junior Member vaasmoto's Avatar
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    he bottom of the Oilhead. Removed the gearbox so that I could access the bottom of the engine for cleaning. It is crusty, all that aluminium oxidation hit the engine really hard over the years. The intention is to repaint the engine in silver enamel so it would look half decent. The oil filter needs a special BMW tool to be removed, however, it’s not that expensive to buy. Will remove all the crusty old paint bits and prep it to be painted. However, I should probably dryfit everything to ensure I does at least run.

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  7. #26
    Junior Member vaasmoto's Avatar
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    Aircraft paint stripper actually a good idea. Thanks Cyorg! I work in the office, my colleagues are involved in repair of all kinds of consumer electronic gadgets.

  8. #27
    Junior Member vaasmoto's Avatar
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    While waiting for previous owner to deliver the missing parts. I decided to do some more cleaning. So removed the gearbox, which allowed me better access to engine’s bottom. Cleaned up what I guess is clutch dust. The method I found works best was loosen everything with 99.9% pure alcohol, then use degreaser and compressed air to further release all the dirt. This did work out like a nice strategy. My next step is to get the engine running, which I guess means I need to get spark and fuel to it. I wonder how hard will it be to do electrics on this bike as I ideally would like to convert everything to Motogadget m-unit blue. The hardest thing should be re-wiring ignition from the Motronic. With the help of internet I’m already looking at basic engine wiring diagram and it’s not as intimidating as I thought it might be.

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  9. #28
    Senior Member Cyorg's Avatar
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    Those exhaust studs are a bit of a game changer and not a DIY thing unless you have the equipment. Did a broken exhaust stud a couple of months back. Removed the head and bolted it to a rotary table, so the stud could be perfectly lined up and clamped down on the table of a drill press. You may have to get those removed using a process that uses an arc (and water) to erode the remains of the stud. The photo gives an indication of how little room for error there is.

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    PS If the barrels/pistons are ok, you can replace the heads without any problem. To fix that engine it's going to cost a pile of money. So after you do your inventory, you need to make a list of things you need to buy or repair and cost it out.
    Last edited by Cyorg; 04-27-2019 at 10:08 AM.
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    "Non urinat in ventum"

  10. #29
    Junior Member vaasmoto's Avatar
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    So, this is the current exhaust pins situation...

    Left hand side head has all 3 removed, however, the threads appear to have been drilled out on 2 of them. 1 hole is completely destroyed.
    On the right hand side, someone seems to have attempted to remove one of the pins by drilling it out, however, the drill path seems to be off centre, maybe that why they stopped. 2 other pins have snapped during exhaust removal. I could attempt to mark the center of the bolt, drill a pilot hole with a small drill bit, then drill a bigger hole, get one of these pin extractor tools, select the correct size and try to get it out that way. Apply some WD-40. Heating the aluminium with a heatgun whilst freezing the bolt might help as well.

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  11. #30
    Junior Member vaasmoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyorg View Post
    Those exhaust studs are a bit of a game changer and not a DIY thing unless you have the equipment. Did a broken exhaust stud a couple of months back. Removed the head and bolted it to a rotary table, so the stud could be perfectly lined up and clamped down on the table of a drill press. You may have to get those removed using a process that uses an arc (and water) to erode the remains of the stud. The photo gives an indication of how little room for error there is.

    Name:  Carb stud extractor 2.jpg
Views: 127
Size:  120.3 KB

    PS If the barrels/pistons are ok, you can replace the heads without any problem. To fix that engine it's going to cost a pile of money. So after you do your inventory, you need to make a list of things you need to buy or repair and cost it out.
    Great advice, I already started mapping out the things I need to do, fix and acquire. I am still missing some major stuff, such as HT leads, battery, throttle bodies boots and starter. Thank fuck previous owner found them all and sending them my way next week.

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