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1978 Triumph Bonneville project

This is a discussion on 1978 Triumph Bonneville project within the Project Builds forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; Originally Posted by dr.blom Time to weld on a piece of square bar.. Thanks....

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Thread: 1978 Triumph Bonneville project

  1. #11
    Senior Member steveo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr.blom View Post
    Time to weld on a piece of square bar..
    Thanks.
    "It's better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than to open it and remove all doubt"

  2. #12
    Senior Member steveo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyorg View Post
    Is that the factory plug in there? Hard to tell from the photo, but it looks different. ... mine is the first incarnation of the OIF (wish I had a better acronym... something about oil and the floor) , so the plug may have changed by 78. I can use either a 1/2 BSW or 13/16 “normal” socket. Yours looks smaller, with a flange on it. Maybe they reduced the size in a failed attempt to keep folks from reefing the shit out of it. I would be inclined to warn the owner just in case someone jammed something foreign in there and things are going to go south.
    Sorry about the crap pic it was as good as I could get from underneath the bike.
    Can't say for sure if it's the original plug, but it is 13/16ths. My main worry is hitting to hard, and crackiing the case.
    The young man who has made me a number of alloy tanks over the years is good at this sort of stuff, so may well give him a call tomorrow.
    "It's better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than to open it and remove all doubt"

  3. #13
    Senior Member Cyorg's Avatar
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    Does he have a TIG welder? I did this one a while ago.... it was in something important, so was sweating bullets setting it up, so the drill would be centred and not take out any threads. Works well for small stuff, but with the flange on the drain plug it takes more than these guys to budge it. If he bevels the end of whatever he welds on there, then you can sneak in there and get reasonably good penetration on the backside. Don’t think I would want to use anything other than TIG. Easier to control things and actually see what’s going on. Either way good luck... it is gratifying when the little bastards come out without any drama.
    If you lived closer, I could fix you up with a NOS rim, but the catch is it’s amongst a bunch (all unlabelled) and you might go mental figuring out which ones are drilled for conical hubs.
    "Non urinat in ventum"

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  5. #14
    Senior Member steveo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyorg View Post
    Name:  2A22856B-5BC0-4F27-825B-BBCA8D8AE9DF.jpeg
Views: 124
Size:  111.5 KB

    Does he have a TIG welder? I did this one a while ago.... it was in something important, so was sweating bullets setting it up, so the drill would be centred and not take out any threads. Works well for small stuff, but with the flange on the drain plug it takes more than these guys to budge it. If he bevels the end of whatever he welds on there, then you can sneak in there and get reasonably good penetration on the backside. Don’t think I would want to use anything other than TIG. Easier to control things and actually see what’s going on. Either way good luck... it is gratifying when the little bastards come out without any drama.
    If you lived closer, I could fix you up with a NOS rim, but the catch is it’s amongst a bunch (all unlabelled) and you might go mental figuring out which ones are drilled for conical hubs.
    He has a TIG welder, only problem is I'll need to get the engine over to Brightlingsea, which is a bit of a faff.
    Not sure what the previous owner was thinking regarding the wheels. Both have stainless spokes fitted, the front rim has been replaced with a newish Hagon, the rear rim however looks to be original, and is as rough as a Badgers arse.
    Last edited by steveo; 07-07-2019 at 01:45 PM. Reason: Can't spell
    "It's better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than to open it and remove all doubt"

  6. #15
    Senior Member TrialsRider's Avatar
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    Could be worse, Anteater has a way nastier ass then a Badger.

  7. #16
    Senior Member steveo's Avatar
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    Should have been a reasonably straight forward job removing the swinging arm, but the pivot's locked in solid.
    I've tried heat, and brute force to no avail.
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  8. #17
    Senior Member TrialsRider's Avatar
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    Can you cut the head off the bolt and drive it through the rest of the way ? bolt must not be anything exotic or it wouldn't have rusted to begin with.

  9. #18
    Senior Member woodsman's Avatar
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    I've had pretty good luck freeing rusty pins with a heat gun and penetrating oil. You would need to lay the bike down, heat the swing arm and dab penetrating oil, with a paint brush, where the pin protrudes. It should suck the oil in just like solder would.

  10. #19
    Senior Member steveo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrialsRider View Post
    Can you cut the head off the bolt and drive it through the rest of the way ? bolt must not be anything exotic or it wouldn't have rusted to begin with.
    I've been using a large wrench on the head of the bolt in an attempt to free it.
    Looking at the overall condition of the bike I'd say it's been ridden through a good few winters. Every nut, and bolt seems to be putting up a bit of a fight.
    Just out of interest I checked the MOT history. Turns out to be a 1977 model, original colour was blue. Last MOT was 12 years ago, and since 2006 has covered the grand total of 5 miles.
    Looks as though the mileage of 11922 miles is probably genuine.
    "It's better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than to open it and remove all doubt"

  11. #20
    Senior Member steveo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodsman View Post
    I've had pretty good luck freeing rusty pins with a heat gun and penetrating oil. You would need to lay the bike down, heat the swing arm and dab penetrating oil, with a paint brush, where the pin protrudes. It should suck the oil in just like solder would.
    I'll give it another go when or if the engine ever comes out.
    About 10 years ago I had a similar issue with a front engine mounting bolt on a R100. Ended up having to cut through the bolt, and take the engine to an engineer to drill it out.
    Riding through UK winters doesn't do a bike any favours.
    "It's better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than to open it and remove all doubt"

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