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1978 Triumph Bonneville project

This is a discussion on 1978 Triumph Bonneville project within the Project Builds forums, part of the Caferacer.net Forums category; I recently had the opportunity to use a friend’s induction heater to remove the spark plugs from the engine in my brother’s Dodge van. He ...

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Thread: 1978 Triumph Bonneville project

  1. #21
    Member upperb's Avatar
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    I recently had the opportunity to use a friend’s induction heater to remove the spark plugs from the engine in my brother’s Dodge van. He had not changed them in over 90,000 miles of use. I removed the easiest of them to access (with the doghouse removed) and it was TIGHT!!! Assuming that penetrating oil wouldn’t get past the plug gasket (and reluctant to further tempt fate), I borrowed the heater and alternated applying heat to the nut of each remaining spark plug and dousing it with a soybean-based penetrating oil my friend also swears by. It worked like a charm. None broke. Though pricey, the induction heater was safer than an oxyacetylene torch and allowed the heat to be applied to the spark plug, only. If I still did this kind of stuff every day, I would definitely own one.
    Last edited by upperb; 07-13-2019 at 08:11 PM. Reason: Typo

  2. #22
    Senior Member brad black's Avatar
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    interesting. never thought of one of them.

    maybe heat the swingarm pivot pin with a torch, so it conveys the heat down, then fill the recess with penetrant, etc and let it go cold. i recall the old american v8 oil gallery plug trick of heating the plug with a torch until red, then putting a candle on the end of it and letting the wax melt in. then allegedly you could just screw them out.

  3. #23
    Senior Member woodsman's Avatar
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    I've used wax lots of times. I found if you get the metal too hot the wax just boils off, a heat gun and some time usually gets things hot enough.

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  5. #24
    Senior Member Cyorg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steveo View Post
    I'll give it another go when or if the engine ever comes out.
    About 10 years ago I had a similar issue with a front engine mounting bolt on a R100. Ended up having to cut through the bolt, and take the engine to an engineer to drill it out.
    Riding through UK winters doesn't do a bike any favours.
    Well if your going to insist on living in that part of the world and fixing motorcycles, then you should invest in a sheep dip tank or a 45 gallon drum full of diesel. You could just submerge the whole thing and leave it for a month. Cutting that thing out would be a pain because you would have to make 4 cuts through the distance pieces or spacers. I think there is room to do it without buggering the swingarm or pivot, but would take some time and I don’t think there is a lot of room for error on the inner ones. Will the bolt turn at all? You could heat the thing up and jam some more grease through the nipples. Try it a couple of times. The grease would melt and ooze out, but you might be able to force enough in to loosen up some of the sleeves etc. That combined with a good old fashioned thrashing might do it.
    "Non urinat in ventum"

  6. #25
    Senior Member steveo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyorg View Post
    Well if your going to insist on living in that part of the world and fixing motorcycles, then you should invest in a sheep dip tank or a 45 gallon drum full of diesel. You could just submerge the whole thing and leave it for a month. Cutting that thing out would be a pain because you would have to make 4 cuts through the distance pieces or spacers. I think there is room to do it without buggering the swingarm or pivot, but would take some time and I don’t think there is a lot of room for error on the inner ones. Will the bolt turn at all? You could heat the thing up and jam some more grease through the nipples. Try it a couple of times. The grease would melt and ooze out, but you might be able to force enough in to loosen up some of the sleeves etc. That combined with a good old fashioned thrashing might do it.
    I've had 210nm on the bolt but no sign of any movement.
    Plan of action for next week is to lay the frame on to to it's side as woodsman suggested.
    From what I've read a 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone makes a good penetrating fluid, so I'lll give that a go while applying heat directly to the pivot as brad said.
    I won't hold hold by breath but you never know..
    "It's better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than to open it and remove all doubt"

  7. #26
    Senior Member TrialsRider's Avatar
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    I assume it is seized in the swingarm and not the frame.
    Any chance you can put a wheel puller on it, put some power to it and then give the puller a smack with a heavy hammer.

  8. #27
    Senior Member woodsman's Avatar
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    Winter riding here would require studs. They use a liquid brine as well as salt on the roads in the winter to melt ice. I have found if you ride before the rain has had a chance to wash it away in the spring you have a film of the powdery leftovers on the bike. Left on it just eats things.

    When I go from winter (steel wheels) to summer tires (alloy) in the spring the wheels are quite often rust welded on. I've gotten so I sandblast and paint the inside of the winter wheels, every summer, where the contact with the hub is made. Brake calipers have become a r&r item the brine eats them so badly. Freeing up rusted motorized shit has become a common spring topic here.

  9. #28
    Senior Member XB33BSA's Avatar
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    a stuck swinger spindle really sucks eggs man
    the rust is kinda like loctite it swells up
    i have never tried it but heard somewhere that boiling hot olive oil is a good loosener of stuck pistons

  10. #29
    Senior Member Cyorg's Avatar
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    "Non urinat in ventum"

  11. #30
    Junior Member dr.blom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodsman View Post
    Winter riding here would require studs. They use a liquid brine as well as salt on the roads in the winter to melt ice. I have found if you ride before the rain has had a chance to wash it away in the spring you have a film of the powdery leftovers on the bike. Left on it just eats things.

    When I go from winter (steel wheels) to summer tires (alloy) in the spring the wheels are quite often rust welded on. I've gotten so I sandblast and paint the inside of the winter wheels, every summer, where the contact with the hub is made. Brake calipers have become a r&r item the brine eats them so badly. Freeing up rusted motorized shit has become a common spring topic here.
    I hate that salt brine so bad.. why cant people get studded tires and learn to drive instead.. southern swedens roads are thick with it all winter, up north it freezes so deep that salt is useless, and their cars last forever..
    About that pivot bolt, i would just cut and drill it, get the swing out of the frame and press out all the bushings. If its rusted that stuck youre gonna need new everything anyway.
    Last edited by dr.blom; 07-16-2019 at 09:41 AM.

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