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I just saw this add in a local trader paper. Can some of you guys tell me if its a good bike, good price, good cafe project?
Thanks

"1975 SUZUKI GT750, Water Buffalo. 3 cyl., 2 stroke, water cooled. Complete, mostly original, some rust. odometer shows 17K miles. Ran when I bought it a couple months ago. $900 OBO."
 

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If it runs and had no strange noises and the cooling system is not corroded then yes that is a great freaking price for a great freakin motorcycle.

The GT750 is a water cooled 2 stroke nicknamed the buffalo. I know a few people who ride these bikes and get really high mileage out of them. Also know a few who built cafe racers out of them.




some links:

http://draken.gotdns.com/gtxr/

http://vancouver.globat.com/~sundialmotosport.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=4390&highlight=cafe+racer

http://vancouver.globat.com/~sundia...c.php?t=5483&highlight=gray+grey+dog+pictures

http://vancouver.globat.com/~sundialmotosport.com/phpBB2/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GT_750
 

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I forgot to add...

One of the biggest problems of two strokes that have been sitting a long time is that the crank seals go bad. strokers have a set of seals on the crank to keep the gear case oil and the cylinders seperate. If the seal goes bad the engine begins to sump up the gear case oil and the bike blows heavy amounts of smoke out of the cylinder closest to where the seal is bad. Sometimes you get lucky, some times you don't

The good news is that despite it requiring a tear down, bill bune (www.billbune.com) can rebuild your crank good as new (did my t500 crank) and that once it is fixed as long as you ride the bike they should not go bad. Suzuki two strokes are stone simple to work on, probably the easiest multiple cylinder engines to work on.

Also sometimes the pipes get crudded up from years of sitting and will smoke a lot too. The way you check if the bike is sumping gearcase oil is you check the oil level, ride it around the block, and then check it again to see if it dropped.
 

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Just out of curiousity -

I was watching some youtube vid of a gt750 and it sounded soooo badass. I must have one. The problem is that they're effing expensive as hell.

How well does the T500 compare? They're much much cheaper.
 

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only bike i ever rode that scared me lol. i'd never been on a 2 stroke anything so i didnt know about the weird powerband they have.

some people are like slinkies, basically useless but they still make me smile when i push them down the stairs
 

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quote:
Just out of curiousity -

I was watching some youtube vid of a gt750 and it sounded soooo badass. I must have one. The problem is that they're effing expensive as hell.

How well does the T500 compare? They're much much cheaper.
The T500 is about as close as you can come to the british building a two stroke. Seriouly, Suzuki bit off a lot of stuff from Norton and Triumph in building the Titan. Stock the tiran pulls like a 4 stroke - it has a very wide powerband and kicks in fairly low. It is light, flickable and makes decent hp. The down side is that it is buzzy espically through the footpegs and handlebar, and long periods on it make it uncomfortable. It also doesn;t have that triple sound. Suzuki made the bike so you can use it everyday and it is one of the most reliable two strokes there is. It is also stone simple to work on and a lot of guys build race bikes out of them.

The GT750 is a fast touring bike. I would compare it more to the SOHC cb750 and kz900 than to the Kawasaki H2 or RD400. Lots of power, and comfy as heck. A lot of the buzziness with the t500 is gone and you can literally sit on the thing for days if you needed to. Two of the guys on the suzuki board are iron butt record holders, one on a GT750 the other on a GT550. Once again it has a powerband like a 4 stroke, so you can use the bike everyday if you wanted (anybody who has ever ridden an h1 or h2 in the rain will understand this statement). The downside is that if it has been sitting the cooling system has likely corroded and also the bike is heavy (which means it needs every inch of that dual disc system).

In terms of usefullness, if the T500 is a ferrari 355, then the GT750 is a bently azure.

Price wise I don't see much of a difference. Maybe $500 at most. Restored gt750s are more common than T500s.

A t500 and GT750 BTW share the same pistons, Literally - they have the same parts numbers. I think the GT750's center one is just an extra T500 Left piston.
 

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Here Is my 02 cents I had a friend in El paso had one helluva gt750 the guy built his own anit-dive front end. built a set of pipes from some plan from Erve kanamoto ( i hope i spelled that right )
I had rode a Rd350 at the time that was pretty tricked out and that GT was freaking fast and sounded awesome. Like geeto said go for the GT if you can but watch out for the things he mentioned
i have a T500 i am bulding up and can not wait to hear it For me this is a city bike. So buzzeness not a big deal to me I have a 84 FJ 1100 to hit the highway with when needed. I like the simpicity of the T500. my T500 has rear sets a set of chambers, norton seat section. I am all most there with it.
ALso geeto nice article man you paint a great picture with your words about living in NY hitting the L.I.E. very nice writing feeling the Honda wrespond as you open her up i have also owned a CB750 and lived on in El PAso for years as my only transportation. keep up the good work. I saw you posted this on the Suzuki site also about wrirting this story .


84 FJ110
77 bmw R75/7 der sofa
74 Suzuki t500 soon to be on the road
 

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My dad bought a new one when I was a kid - I used to love riding around on the tank when I was like 4. Anyway, they're cool - I've only thrown a leg around one once as an adult and it did not seem peaky in the least. If it weren't for the exhaust note and blue smoke you could say it was 4-strokish. Definitely the pinnacle of 2-stroke street bike (as opposed to repliracer) design.

All old Suzukis feel kinda "long" and slow steering to me, but I'm mostly a small bike guy.
 

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My dad bought a new one when I was a kid - I used to love riding around on the tank when I was like 4. Anyway, they're cool - I've only thrown a leg around one once as an adult and it did not seem peaky in the least. If it weren't for the exhaust note and blue smoke you could say it was 4-strokish. Definitely the pinnacle of 2-stroke street bike (as opposed to repliracer) design.

All old Suzukis feel kinda "long" and slow steering to me, but I'm mostly a small bike guy.
 

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Damn, that black one is SWEEET!
Any two stroke from the 70's gets my blood boiling anyway...add some Expansion Chambers and a few nice cosmetic touches....mmmmmmm.
I've heard that stock they don't have the peakiness typical of most 2=strokes; if memory serves me correct, they were marketed mostly as a touring bike. Sounds like a solid project bike at a good price, though.



Edited by - Quicklimegirl on Dec 23 2006 12:53:36 PM
 

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quote:

I've heard that stock they don't have the peakiness typical of most 2=strokes; if memory serves me correct, they were marketed mostly as a touring bike.
That is true of almost all of suzuki's road going two stroke motorcycles, they are very smooth and ride almost like four strokes. Porting and chambers goes a long way with these bikes. It isn;t hard to get rip snorting two stroke power out of them but I think it kills the character of what these bikes are about.

When I got my T500 it had an AHRMA race engine in it built by Dr. Von Strangemind. It rode very much like my '75 H1. Then I rode a stock T500 and found that the stocker was much more fun because I didn't have to manage my revs as much when I was riding spiritedly. The 5 extra hp was not worth it to me. Now that I have two I am building one stock and one hot so I can have the best of both worlds (and scare myself occasionally two stroke style).
 

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I've always liked T500s - I prefer the looks and overall size to the GT750. BUT I've never ridden one. I think one is definitely in my future when I get the CB450 done.
 

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quote:
I just saw this add in a local trader paper. Can some of you guys tell me if its a good bike, good price, good cafe project?
Thanks

"1975 SUZUKI GT750, Water Buffalo. 3 cyl., 2 stroke, water cooled. Complete, mostly original, some rust. odometer shows 17K miles. Ran when I bought it a couple months ago. $900 OBO."


If you like to ride something that is WAY fun and off the beaten path, the Water Buffalo is for you.
The GT750 is one of the most fun bikes I have ever ridden.

You will get excellent support from the guys on the Sundial site that Geeto referenced. They have all helped me out alot.

UFOB #56

The Mighty Buffalo
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for all the advice. I like the looks of the bike a lot but I was looking for a really cheap barn bike to start out with. But who knows I keep thinking about trying to swing it.
Ogri, thats a good looking bike you got there.
 
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