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Sounds like a whole lot of power going somewhere, or your battery is shorting out internally the moment you put any load on it.

... horn takes a lot more power then most realize, it's practically a dead short every time you use it.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Sounds like a whole lot of power going somewhere, or your battery is shorting out internally the moment you put any load on it.

... horn takes a lot more power then most realize, it's practically a dead short every time you use it.
I'm using a battery bigger than suggested I dont think that's the problem. I had it load tested. As for the other comment, I purchased the ignition switch with key aftermarket. I've had problems with aftermarket parts but I couldn't find an original Suzuki one with a key. So maybe the aftermarket ignition key switch came with a short in it. I'm currently taking off the tape that overs all the wiring and searching for any wires that are cut/shorted.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
alright. I feel a bit stupid now but disregard almost all of my last posts. Turned out I've been testing the secondary hot wire(Orange) which brings power to the start button wrong. Ive been testing it with the negative terminal on my multi meter, not the positive haha how silly. Once I swapped the leads, I now get 12.9v all through the red and orange wires, even up to the start switch. I checked the continuity of both the start switch and the kill switch and both appear to operate fine. Now that I have power, the only thing I can see the problem being is the switch its self. I took apart the clutch safety switch just in case and it was pretty dirty so I hit the contacts with some steel wool and its good as new. Still wont turn over via the start button. Should I start looking for a starter solenoid or redo the wiring altogether??? No clue where to go from here. Any help at all is greatly appreciated!
 

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Are you getting power to the solenoid?
There is no sense redoing wiring if you don't know it's the problem. Start at the ignition and follow the power until you find where it stops.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Are you getting power to the solenoid?
There is no sense redoing wiring if you don't know it's the problem. Start at the ignition and follow the power until you find where it stops.
yep. I can get the motor to turn over if I cross the terminals with a screwdriver. Ill do some more tracing but from what I can tell there Is voltage all the way to the break light which is where the wire ends.
 

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yep. I can get the motor to turn over if I cross the terminals with a screwdriver. Ill do some more tracing but from what I can tell there Is voltage all the way to the break light which is where the wire ends.
That sounds more like the switch is in the parking light position does it not?
 

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Discussion Starter #28
That sounds more like the switch is in the parking light position does it not?
Voltage goes to the break light switch... not the actual light unless I press the break lever. I didn't explain that correctly, Ill try to be more clear.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
That sounds more like the switch is in the parking light position does it not?
According to the switch I got off of ebay (I know, parts can have issues and whatnot but it was only 20 bucks for a new ignition swtch). I am in the "ON" position when testing the voltage.
 

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If engine turned and there are no sparks. Assuiming no loose wires, good ground, and good ignition coils, your issue pointed to 1. Pulse generator/pick up ignition . Simple ohms test will tell you if it's working. or 2. the CDI is fried. Clymer's Suziki GS manual does show you how to use a multi meter or a 1,5Volt battery to test the CDI. Better yet, swap CDI from donor bike since you have two.
 

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Hi, you bike is a 1980, that's 40 years old! The actual contacts in the ignition switch or start button could be corroded enough to , show voltage on the gage but not pass enough current to operate the circuit. You might be able to test this by bypassing the switch. I don't know what the wire color is, but on most Hondas from that time the starter switch wire is yellow with a red stripe. On that Honda, if you unplug the yellow/red wire inside the headlight and jump it to 12v it should bypass the start switch and spin the starter. Note; make sure you put the 12v to the end that goes into the frame, not the wire that goes back to the handlebar switch. Of course you will have to follow the wire diagram in your service manual to se if there are any ,clutch switch, kickstand switch, in that circuit. The starter solenoid should be directly connected and have power all the time, like you said, you could jump the starter and it worked. In this way you can test the circuit from the solenoid back to the ignition switch, one part at a time until you find the short? So if the starter spins when you jump it there, plug it back in and take the other wire off of the start switch, then jump 12v to it and push the start button, and so on. Last time (a CL450) I did this, it was corroded contacts in the start button itself. I had to disassemble the switch and buff the contacts with a Scotch-bright pad then it started. If your not getting spark, it could be the same. Hondas used bullet connector at the coils and they would get corroded and not let the coil get voltage. I've also found connectors that looked like they were plugged in but weren't actually making contact under the plastic cover. Some times plugging and un plugging the connectors a few times may clean off enough corrosion to make a circuit also. Just keep after it and you'll find it soon enough, and who knew we'd have this much time to dink around with stuff because of this stupid virus? Good luck!
 

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If you give me your email through the "conversations" I can give you a proper factory service manual for that bike.

I think OHC has a good idea for testing your switch. Corrosion is most often the problem with these bikes, the components themselves are pretty dependable.
 

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This is what you should see in your service manual, I'm old tech and don't have a printer that scans, so I took a photo of the page ( I'm using a 1983 Suzuki GR650 book here) but it should be similar in your book. in the picture of the started circuit, you can see the current flow from the start switch to the solenoid. The picture of the switch, in the second picture shows the wire color ,on the top line and the connections at the bottom. So it looks like the Y/G wire goes from the switch to the solenoid? and probably the O wire is the hot wire,12v. I'd verify the hot wire 1st , then jump it to the Y/G to bypass the switch. The O and O/W wires are the ignition circuit the runs through the kill switch you can check it with a volt meter there but remember that just because it shows voltage there doesn't guarantee you will have enough current to run the circuit, if the contacts are corroded it could have to much resistance to pas the current. Hope that helps.
103048
103049
 

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I thought of 1 more thing, there is a fuse on either side of the ignition switch in my picture. it could be that second fuse or the actual fuse holder. if you still have problems you could use a jumper wire to bypass either fuse ( only to test it!) and might find the fuse holder has corrosion issues?
 

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Sorry I'm late to the party here.

If you're still getting voltage with the ignition switched off you have the switch wired wrong. It's aftermarket - use your multimeter to check the wiring and ignore the wire colours.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
A very big thanks to everyone who gave me tips and any other help. Today, I continued my quest to find the electrical problem. I pulled my solenoid d off and did a bench test, and everything was functioning correctly. I put it back on the bike and scratched my head for a bit haha. Then, for some reason I had the urge to test the ground on the solenoid once it was hooked up to the bike. Booya!!! The spot that the solenoid screws in was super rusty so it hit it with some steel wool and just like that, the bike turned over with the start switch. I put my carbs back on the bike and some fresh gas in my makeshift tank as well as new plugs and she fired up. The bike idles fine with the choke on but dies when I give it any gas. My carb rebuild kit is in the mail so ill do a full clean before I try to run it again. Also put fresh oil in. My battle with the 40yo machine is no where close to finished, but I feel like a running ish engine is something to be proud of. Thanks for all the help once again. Ill look at some other forums for carb help because someone has definitely already answered my questions. One more note. The bike didnt come with any airbox or filters at all. So for the min I ran it it had no restriction whatsoever. Could this cause the terrible run status? I almost ordered pod filters untill I saw that they are a big no no. Cant find a OEM airbox in goof condition tho. Thx and hopefully Ill be able to get this bike back on the road soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I thought of 1 more thing, there is a fuse on either side of the ignition switch in my picture. it could be that second fuse or the actual fuse holder. if you still have problems you could use a jumper wire to bypass either fuse ( only to test it!) and might find the fuse holder has corrosion issues?
I saw that too on my wiring diagram. From what I can tell, the bike only has one fuse which I now Know is OK.
 

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Searched for the wiring diagram for your bike and it took me to some site called cafe racer dot net :cool:
 
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