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Still better off then the previous one. First thing you should be searching for is a shop and owner manual, that will tell you all about what emission shite it had on it.
 

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... by the time the PowerBand kicks in ...
Something is wrong, a 4-cylinder 750cc engine doesn't have a narrow power band that kicks in anywhere. I would question if your engine is running on all cylinders. Compression test would be in order and verify that all 4 cylinders are getting hot.
You can't fix poor performance by gearing it lower.
 

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So it's basically working at half power and maximum fuel consumption. (y) On the up side there is tons of room for improvement. Your avatar makes me want to have a beer and I rarely even drink the stuff, you're a bad influence on me :LOL:
 

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You could check your valve clearances and see if that one lazy cylinder is way off adjust compared to the rest, but significant lower pressure on one cylinder is often a sign of a more serious problem inside that lung.
 

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My guess is cracked valve seat between the spark plug hole and exhaust valve.
... if the rings were damaged and not the valves he'd be losing compression into the crankcase and that should become quickly apparent.
 

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.... I'm trying really hard to read about geometry before I come on here asking stupid questions but it's fucking complicated to me because I suck at math. I learn better by making small changes and feeling the difference.
The way to learn about motorcycle geometry is to ride lots of different bikes, like very expensive bikes from Italy, Spain and Germany, then you have something to compare the differences with.
 

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I can link him to a nice reproduction RSU fork setup with a yoke setup for about 5000 new zealand $
Parts to service the forks he has now is going to cost him several hundreds of $ in OEM parts

Used forks don't come pre serviced and "cheap" unless they are stolen goods, they simply do not fall off the back of the local motorcycle fork delivery truck. Fork oil is going to cost stupid money on its own, What part of complete front motorcycle fork replacement to a much larger size is "cheap" unless it's one of the 50 something thousand motorcycles stolen annually in the USA alone. Those are called "hot" motorcycles and a huge chunk of them are thrived only for parts. "self respecting motorbike thief" is an oxymoron if they had any self respect they wouldn't thieve motorcycles, reality is they will steal anything they can until they get caught. We seen "cheap" front ends come through here before and you could clearly see damage where the ignition switch was removed with a hammer and a screwdriver.
You got a front end to sell him "cheap" ?
 

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Ah, so cheap used RSU forks come off race bikes where the racers sell them off for the price of just the bushings because they are fitting USD forks so they can go race open modified class and you are telling us that's the reason RSU forks are cheap, not because 51000 motorcycles are stolen in your country every year. :unsure: I totally believe that
 

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What list there is no list, you stated "used 41 mm RSU front ends are really cheap"
I'm going to a good motorcycle breakers tomorrow, I'll look for forks and trees that would work for him and I'll get a their best price on anything they have that fits that description, but I can tell you right now they will cost more then your 25US$ that much will buy you 1 litre of fork oil.
 

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Going to be a cold ride to the bike wreckers today, it dropped below freezing last night. :coffee:
Ya Rich said forks are 100$ each and I just priced out the front axle for my 41mm RSU forks on flea bay at 120$ US plus shipping, that's for only the used axle. His guesstimate prices are unrealistic unless the seller is getting parts for free. 'Front forks' and "really cheap" does not compute unless you are rich I guess.
 

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You could probably get one turned down at a machine shop for peanuts....but then, it wouldn't have the zinc coating. I have seen Youtube videos where guys do home-made zinc coating - might be worth a thought.
Except it's titanium, that was my BMW axle I was pricing because I knew Woody had some scrap beemers.

I found an easy 6 donor bikes with decent 41mm front ends today, I'll post a couple of photos in a few minutes, just burning up some steaks at the moment.
 

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To get an entire front end for just a few hundred US$ you'd be looking at needing to remove the parts yourself and barter some. These bikes are near Perth Ontario if you are interested, and your US$ is worth a buck 28 up here, plus US visitors are not subject to our 13% sales taxes if your purchases are under a grand

Wheel Tire Crankset Bicycle tire Motor vehicle

Automotive tire Tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Pollution

Wheel Tire Automotive lighting Automotive tire Vehicle

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... notice most of these scrap bikes have the key in the ignition (y) that's because this inventory was not stolen.
 

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You guys are really lucky to have a junk yard that isn't totally picked over. I don't think its practical for me to travel that far. Off topic, I watched a documentary about John Britten tonight. It was awesome
If you want the good deals from the motorcycle dealers you start by riding with them or racing with them, yards like Woody's buy trade-ins from other motorcycle dealerships by the truck load, so salvage inventory is constantly changing. Even the owner doesn't really know what he has in stock at any given time there are simply too many bikes, the yard and storage containers have a thousand or more motorcycles in various states of disassembly at any given time and that's why a phone call to a scrap yard is useless. If you change your mind and want to make a road trip, come to my place first and I'll take you there to strip the parts you need, guys like Woody don't normally let strangers dive into the salvage yard with their own tools, that's a very special privilege.
 

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Google up: "brake lining" and add the word "roll" or "sheet" (y)
... oh wait, you are asking about 'hydraulic' hoses. I've only bought those pre-built. You want a hydraulic specialty shop for that stuff.
 

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You can buy the hose by length and you can buy thread on couplings that are considered "field repair" parts or you can have the fittings crimped on which is considered to be the correct and permanent fix. The crimp tools cost bigger money then buying a new hose, so to invest in the tools to build your own custom hoses you are going to want to be making them often.

(y) all those fittings are available through hydraulic specialty shops.
 

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Hagon shocks are usually worthy of consideration and typically offer an economical upgrade for twin shock street bikes, they don't have any fancy gas reservoirs etc. biggest challenge will be determining your optimum spring rates.
 

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Let me explain.... previous owner did this: View attachment 106540
These are so stiff I might as well be riding a hard tail.... just want something more pleasant. Not trying to drag a knee on this bike guys.... how the hell do you select and purchase hagons? Have you looked at their website? Is there a USA distributor?
First thing to do is determine the spring rates of the dual springs you have on there now, then select a set of springs that will have a lower rating. Single rate and dual spring setups are often preferred for racing or very spirited riding and progressive wound springs are better suited to pleasure riding because they soak up the tiny bumps and give a more plush ride. The spring rate is determined by measuring the amount of weight it takes to compress the spring one inch. With a progressive rate spring the low number is the weight it takes to compress the spring the first one inch of travel and the large number is the weight required to compress the spring the Last one inch of travel before becoming completely coil bound.

I haven't bought aftermarket twin shocks in decades, no surprise if it is difficult to source them, time was when every motorcycle shop had at least one set of hagons hanging on the wall. Other brands I've had good luck with in the past are Betor, Marzocchi or Girling with Marzocchi typically being the more expensive option.
 
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