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Same configuration, but they are not the same engine...at all. The Intercepter cylinders are canted back further, gear driven cams, chain drive. I don’t think there are many parts, if any, that are interchangeable.
The Interceptor is the second generation V4. They were developed from the S and the C. I don't think it's a stretch to say they are basically the same, as one is developed from the other and they are all V4, DOHC motors. The top ends are very much similar with the differences mostly being that the F has 5 gears and is chain driven. And it's the third generation VFR that had the gear driven cams. My reference was to the F. Regardless, the point is still the same- F or R is a better platform than the Sabre or Magna, which like Teazer said is a formidable red light to red light drag bike.
 

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Those mid 80’s were quite the power cruiser days.
Suzuki had their v4 Madura, Yamaha their V-max, Honda Sabre and Magna.
Kawasaki had the lone inline-4 Zl900.
 

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Discussion Starter #123 (Edited)
Thanks for the history lesson boys. I didn't go with an interceptor (F or R model) for 2 reasons. One I don't need all of that race bike performance (engine and chassis). I am building a bike for the streets. Two the look of the interceptor just makes me cringe. The fairings w.e. i can take those off, but the square frame bars are just not something i am fond of. I like the classic round tubing all around, especially if one is to strip the bike down and draw even more attention to it. Personal preference really.

As for the difference in lowering the front forks not being very noticeable. Yes at this time it isn't but in the future it will be. Here's the write up I did on what I actually did. In the video you can see things better too. https://www.balkanmoto.com/articles/10
 

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Thanks for the history lesson boys. I didn't go with an interceptor (F or R model) for 2 reasons. One I don't need all of that race bike performance (engine and chassis). I am building a bike for the streets. Two the look of the interceptor just makes me cringe. The fairings w.e. i can take those off, but the square frame bars are just not something i am fond of. I like the classic round tubing all around, especially if one is to strip the bike down and draw even more attention to it. Personal preference really.

As for the difference in lowering the front forks not being very noticeable. Yes at this time it isn't but in the future it will be. Here's the write up I did on what I actually did. In the video you can see things better too. https://www.balkanmoto.com/articles/10
listen you ignorant cull you dont even grasp the simple concepts
that is painfully obvious
please explain in another video and right here as to how simply,without internal modifications, lowering the front end shortens the fork travel
the only way you have shortened travel is when the fork brace collides with the lower triple clamp ,moron
listen shit for brains the only thing that determines the forks travel is the effective length of the damper rod
which requires something besides feces for brain matter to understand
 

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Discussion Starter #125
save it... your not teaching anybody here anything
Intent was never to teach anyone anything, especially people on here. The intent was to receive feedback, so i can improve my own knowledge, should there be anything I've miss understood or completely missed.

listen you ignorant cull you dont even grasp the simple concepts
that is painfully obvious...
Thanks for the feedback.
 

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Discussion Starter #126
Got to do some work on the carburetors of the new bike. Turns out the rubber boots between the carbs and the engine are pretty shot and will need replacing. Also the gaskets on the float bowls were not sealing properly and were packed with some sort of gray liquid gasket type sealant. I was also unaware that the breather-separator box was full, so this shit started pumping into the air box when i tried to start the bike in order to start to debug the issues. (What some would refer to as "blow-by", or so the inter tubes say)
blow-by.JPG
IMG_20181118_112246.jpg
I drained it and took the carbs off to get them cleaned up. I have ordered some new rubber boots and gaskets and was wondering what the expert opinion on here is about using any type of grease or liquid gasket material for ease of installation and to create a better seal between the rubber components and the metal? Would you recommend doing it at all? If yes what would you recommend works best and for what application?
 

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Discussion Starter #127
Its been a while since i posted in here. I've made some great progress on the project. Here is some photos of the latest work:





For full details on what i have done in the past checkout the series: 1982-83 Honda V45 Sabre Series

I recently purchased an ultrasonic cleaner. Do any of you have suggestions on what to use as the solution in it, to clean the carbs?
 

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Water is cheap :|

It could potentially turn the aluminum and brass bits a nasty colour if you over-cook it. I just clean them with rags and carb cleaner.
I think I seen these pictures a while back, no?
 

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Discussion Starter #129
Well i got the ultrasonic cleaner more for the internals of the carbs. You know the places you can't get to with small brushes and things. I guess i'll try it with water first see how much that takes off.

As for the pics, i definitely haven't posted them here before. It could be another sabre project. I know a number of individuals that have sabre projects that look nearly identical.
 

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Discussion Starter #133
So i am in need of some electrical help. I have recently installed an LED strip as the rear lights.



The LED strip i am using has 5 wires:
- ground
- running light
- right turn signal
- left turn signal
- brake light

I have purchased an LED compatible blinker relay and hooked it up in place of the stock one, which fixed the insane blinking rate for the blinkers.

However my problem is with the brake light. The bike harness has 2 wires for the rear lights, one for running and one for brake light. Both send back the usual 12V, and the green/yellow one gets a slight bump when the brake pedal is actuated. However the electricity running through that green/yellow cable is already high enough for the LED strip to be pretty much always ON the brake light. So my question for any of the electrical gurus here is what can be done to remedy this issue? I've heard of people using diodes and resistors to bring down the power but i am unsure of how much resistance, and whether or not his will even work.

The LED strip i bought is this: https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07DHFRYY7
 

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LED is a light emitting diode <- it is a diode so forget about adding more of those, although that might be a great idea because you have less then half the 8 square inches of illuminated tail light that you really should have.

Your always on problem likely relates to the direction of the current travel and not the voltage, otherwise you likely would have fried the LED's imho. Diodes are a directional device.

... notice the advertisement shows it as an accessory light, is not intended for primary signal lights.

The correct answer is, put proper incandescent lamps on there for signal and tail lighting, wire the bling strip to the lights and it will probably work dandy.
 

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Discussion Starter #135
Alright i finally figured out my brake light issue. It was a dumb wiring mistake. I've since done quite a bit of work on the bike. Got the clutch sorted out, as well as the street required things like horn, blinkers and such. The coolant overflow tank is in place as well. I did replace the throttle cable, and hook up the speedo as well. Will likely post an update once winter is done when i get it safetied. Either way here is a photo for the members on here to rip apart all the things wrong with it :p
IMG_20200125_104032.jpg
 

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You don't think the brown seat sticks out like a zit? It's like you couldn't find the right seat.

I don't know where you are having your safety done but my mechanic wouldn't pass the modified frame or the tail light. I doubt he would approve the 3" reduction in suspension travel. Does your gauge package include kick stand, neutral light etc.?
 

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Discussion Starter #137
I agree the colors and aesthetics are a bit off right now. The brown seat will make more sense when i get to the eventual repainting. I wanted to focus on getting everything to function before ripping it all off and painting things.

As for the safety on the bike:
- forks are actually only dropped 1.5", the stock position is not actually with the top of the fork tubes flush with the top yolks. Either way thats not much of an issue for safetying the bike since i could always raise them to stock position before i go
- as for the frame, I do plan on polishing those welds up, and painting that portion of the frame before going to safety it. I read over the law about safety certification on modified motorcycles, and as long as the welds are solid and nothing looks like, or will fall off that should be solid, should be able to pass that portion of the safety.
- i don't have it yet, but i do plan on getting one of those tire hugger mudguards that sit on a bracket behind the rear tire. I know it wont pass safety without a rear mud guard. Plus mounting the license plate on that mudguard will also ensure that i don't run into problems with putting it off to the side.
- My speedo/tachometer actually has more functionality then the bike has. I currently have these features in use and working: speedometer, tachometer, turn signal indicators, high beam indicator, N and Gear indicator, Heat sensor, fuel amount. I do have an engine fault light and an ABS light that are currently not hooked up. I do have some ideas on how to make use of the engine fault light. The ABS will remain unused since the bike has none.
- The tail/brake light will be the wild card. While I do agree that it is significantly less square footage of illuminated surface then stock, or what one might consider safe. I couldn't find anything in the safety certification law that specifies exact minimum size. (I may be wrong) Last time i was at the mechanic there was actually a cafe racer sitting in the parking waiting for some work, and I asked him how hard is it to safety one of them. That specific one actually had a very similar led strip tail light. He pretty much said that as long as there is lights and they work as intended (aka get brighter when brake is operated) it should be fine. In any case if he says he won't pass it with just the strip i can always get an additional incandecent brake light and mount it on the mudguard above the license plate as an additional light. In addition to the above i am not sure its obvious from the picture above but i am actually not going to be using the led turn signals that are built into the LED strip. I mounted independent incandescent turn signals on either side of the seat, that are far larger and brighter then the 8 leds that the turn signals on the stip are. So on that front I should be fine.
 
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