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According to the schematic the solid red goes from the battery + to a fuse and then on to the ignition switch. Your test would suggest a burned out fuse on that circuit. If the fuse failed to protect the circuit then the ignition switch would be the first thing to fry on that circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
According to the schematic the solid red goes from the battery + to a fuse and then on to the ignition switch. Your test would suggest a burned out fuse on that circuit. If the fuse failed to protect the circuit then the ignition switch would be the first thing to fry on that circuit.

Well you're definitely on to something here and this a huge help to me connecting the dots here. So I very much appreciate you taking the time to follow along with me. You're on the money though, there is a problem with the fuse circuit. I tested the fuse and got no signal. I did put in another fuse just to make sure it wasn't the fuse itself, but that did not fix it.

So if I'm understanding you, what you're saying is that my overpowered headlight has damaged the power wire, which is kinda deactivating the fuse, and that in turn may have fried my ignition switch?
 

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"So if I'm understanding you, what you're saying is that my overpowered headlight has damaged the power wire, which is kinda deactivating the fuse, and that in turn may have fried my ignition switch?"

The fuse is designed to be the weakest link in the chain. To melt the fuse means that circuit (in this case the Main fuse circuit) was subjected to over-heating. The ignition switch is the first component down line from the fuse and the contacts inside the switch are sensitive to failure due to heat and electric arcing. Once the fuse melts that circuit is dead and no additional damage can happen after the fuse. If the switch was burned it would be during operation of the overloaded circuit.
 
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