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dude, your consultation fee's in the mail already!

(of course, if anyone else is as well versed in all things 750, your opinions are also very much duly appreciated.)

i'm looking into a '78 750F3: IMMACULATE, original owner, 5000 miles...stunning, unmolested original example. thing is, i know this year is sort of a bastard child in the SS line and i'm wondering what special considerations i should have about the long term value of a potentially odd ball production...especially compared to the F1 and F2s. i'm looking for good clean stocker to ride the piss out of and potentially retain most, if not all of the true value and i'm concerened that this might not necessarily be the best condidate for a real rider.
 

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supersports are the best bargaining going right now in the cb750 ranks. They don't have the iconic looks of the 1969 to 76 K bike but there are many "improvements" that make them a better bike.

The 1977-78 cb750 bottom end is the strongest bottom end in a cb750. the large countershaft is really beefy and was seen as a cure for the cb750's quirk of throwing chains when you put some serious hp into them. the '78 cb750 motors are one of the fastest cb750 motors and it is due to the combination of big valve head, new cam, carbs with an accelerator pump, and a slightly improved exhaust (which actually weighs a ton and rots really easily). All this power comes at a price however - the big valves are yough on the guides and 78 cb750Fs usually need new guides at around 30-35K miles. 25k if you beat them hard and are not religious about your oil changes. Look for oil smoke when you get on and off the throttle and you'll know when you need guides. Most places like dynoman stock the guides and any machine shop can put them in.

the chassis is your basic cb750 chassis with the improvement of the supersport pressed boxed swingarm (two pressed half box sections welded together at the center lenthwise). Much thicker and stronger than the standard K bike round tube spagetti swingarm. The supersports recieved disc brakes front and rear in 1975, but they were little more than just another front caliper mounted in the rear and sucked. the 77-78 bikes were the first to get decent calipers that actually can haul you down from speed, even the rear works great. Plus you can upgrade to the 1982 dual pot calipers and get a really modern caliper on there. The comstars are ugly, and some of them require you to run tubes in them, they can't be swapped for spoke rims easily, but since the bike shares more with the DOHC cb750s in the suspension department than the SOHC bikes, there are plenty of modern upgrade parts to get the most out of your bike.

for a while 77-78 SS's were really cheap because they have a domed piston and large combustion chamber which means you couldn't put a big bore kit in the engine without losing any power you were seeking to make. For some reason a cb750 motor without the potential to be modded is considered a lesser motor. Now Dynoman has big bore kits for the 77-78 F bikes. Also the bike is kind of heavy, coming just over 500lbs with full fuel as opposed to its earlier K bike sibling that is just shy of that. The extra power more than makes up for the weight though and you don't feel it.

As for value, well....cb750s are long past their depreciation curve and while there are those that shun the supersport, the bike has devloped a growing cult following and I doubt you will lose any value on it unless you magically put 30,000 miles on it in the next two years. Honestly, I can't say that you will make money on it but I don't see you losing money on the bike (excluding cost of fuel, insurance, etc) unless you really let it go to shit.

as for oddball parts, aside from the suspension and wheels, the big ticket items are the left sidecover and the stock exhaust. If this bike has a really nice stock muffler I would suggest you take it off the bike and run a mac instead - you could probably pay for the bike with what a stock 78 cb750 muffler will go for on ebay. The left sidecover, well there are repros but people pay for the originals. When I was looking for one I lost several ebay auctions for them that were well over $100. The right one is the same from 75-78 but the lefty is 77-78 only.

I own 2 1978 cb750Fs a bone stocker with 6000 miles and my dunstall with mileage unkonwn. While my 1975K bike is down for some iggy work, I have been riding the dunstall a lot and I love it as a day to day bike.
 

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Hey, the CB750 I bought is a '78F SS - are the original sidecovers chrome or aluminum? I ask because the guy I bought it from put several layers of crappy paint on them, and I'd like to remove it, but I don't know what's underneath...
 

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wow that is a really nice clean cb750. All stock too. And yes it even has the original muffler on it (although I would check for rot at the base of the collector).

Bo, the sidecovers are abs injection molded plastic. Usually they are kinda brittle after 30+ years of being manhandled. to strip them I usually use one of three things:

1) bumper strip fro an auto body supply house. Spray on like an aerosol and then scrape off with a PLASTIC paint scraper

2) walnut shells in the sandblaster at really low pressure. like 5 psi low. take your time and stop frequently

3) 350 grit sandpaper. makes my arms look all muscular and shit.
 

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geeto - I should have been more specific - I meant the engine sidecovers. The original filter/oilbag covers on my bike are cracked, I'm just going to make fiberglass covers for them.
 

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engine cases are aluminum. easy to strip.

if you don't care about looking perfect a lot fo cb racers I know used to replace the plastic frame sidecovers with sheet aluminum and dzuz fastners. looked functional and badass.
 
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