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I ahve a 78 CB 400T that when I bought it the previous owner told me he had replaced the clutch. However I don't think he was very mechanically inclined at the look of the rest of the bike. Here is the problem: when the bike warms up and I crank on some pwer the clutch locks and won't disengage. No matter how much pressure I put on the lever it won't budge. I just have to cruis around and ride it out for about a minute then its OK. I have changed the oil with proper M/C oil as I thought the PO may have used car oil and that was causing the problem, it still does it but not nearly as much. Any ideas of what I should do?
 

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Buy a manual and open her up. Check the plates out, they could be rusty/ sticky. A good cleaning and once over everything usually clears issues like this up. Could even be a cable issue or actuator. Check the springs too. Buying a manual and going through the maintenance section is a good idea, best way to find and address these little issues plus you'll get to know your bike. MC oil is oil in a MC container.

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Try sanding the glaze off the fiber plates (not the steels if they are dimpled, if they are not and rusty replace). Also try adjusting your clutch cable, sounds to me like the cable might be binding also.
 

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Geeto,
I always hit the steels with the sander, when I am refurbing a used clutch. I use an orbital sander with a medium grit and just kinda scuff them up. Why don't you recommend sanding the steels? I have been doing for years on all my racebikes.

Ken

AHRMA 412
Vintage racing - old guys on old bikes
 

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some of the honda steels are dimpled, the idea is that it traps small bits of oil and air and helps keep glazing at bay. On a race bike this isn't really an issue because 1) it can reduce grip, and 2) because in an entire season you may use the clutch of your race bike 1/4 of the amount of time a street bike uses it in a month. most race clutch steels don't have these dimples because the focus is on grip not longevity.

of course you don't want any rust on there and you can grind them to clean them off, but clutches are cheap enough you can just get replacement plates. ideally you don't want to remove those dimples on a street bike and they are kinda shallow to begin with.



Edited by - geeto67 on May 22 2007 4:31:43 PM
 

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OK I get you. I never sand enough to remove the dimples. I just scuff the surface of the steels to break any glaze that is on there. I think a scuffed plate holds the oil a little better like the dimples. I am cheap and never replace steel plates unless they are warped or overheated and blued.

Ken

AHRMA 412
Vintage racing - old guys on old bikes
 

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OK I get you. I never sand enough to remove the dimples. I just scuff the surface of the steels to break any glaze that is on there. I think a scuffed plate holds the oil a little better like the dimples. I am cheap and never replace steel plates unless they are warped or overheated and blued.

Ken

AHRMA 412
Vintage racing - old guys on old bikes
 
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