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immobilizer maybe
... or maybe it's too old to have one, no idea when that stuff started on GSXR
Likely a stolen bike if the ignition/steering lock was removed with a hammer, does it pass a title history search, in some places it would need to. lol holy are you ever addicted to buying old bikes
 

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Why don't you just prep it for racing and sell it as a race bike, that would greatly simplify the build and remove the cost of electrics.
... that means it would need to pass a tech inspection.
 

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Is that clean engine oil?
Head gasket is generally the only seam subjected to combustion pressures that are sufficient enough to force oil out of the engine. Everything above or below the combustion chamber is normally operating closer to atmospheric pressure and oil passages delivering oil to the valve train is operating at lower oil pressure, but the oil has to travel through the same head gasket. If it was a header gasket leak it would be black with carbon and if the engine was water-cooled then leaking combustion pressure would likely end up in the engine coolant. If the oil leak is spewing clean oil, that could still be the head gasket or an o-ring somewhere, but if it is an oil delivery line leak you should also see signs of reduced oil pressure. Too bad they don't put decent oil pressure gauges on motorcycles, that would make it more obvious. Sadly either way, you are looking at a top end rebuild because an oil leak doesn't heal itself it only gets worse and your cheap bike just became very expensive.
 

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If I'm looking for an oil leak the first thing I do is to clean the engine.

...that usually requires a toothbrush and some kind of engine de-grease stuff and then you dry it off before test riding.
 

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If you're going to scrap an engine in a decent rolling chassis, I think we are in the era where it is a lot easier and more practical to convert to electric.
 

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Bonus (y) is that where an oil pressure gauge would go?
or an oil cooler?
Shift lever is usually on a spline shaft with a regular pinch bolt. The ball joints themselves are usually Heim joints where the ball can not be removed but they can be disassembled at the adjuster.
 

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... I looked at the part manual, the only left thread should be on one adjuster and the one end of the connecting rod. The adjustment is only there so you can position the lever at a comfortable angle, it's not a slack adjuster where small adjustment will be critical. If you can't get original parts that should not be a huge problem, you can buy small plain spherical bearings easy and make something if necessary.
 

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Fit it with a magnetic kill button and lanyard for about 40 bucks plus shipping.
That will confound the stupid motorcycle thieves for a little while and they work good.
 

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Can't be right, it's a 4 cylinder motorcycle, should be 4 numbers hopefully all close together but not likely to be all the same. Compression test is a relative test and in a perfect world you (or the manufacturer) would have recorded the original compression numbers from when the engine was new to compare with.
 

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The compression on the dead cylinder is 155
Yes but if they are all 155 you are good to go, and if the others are higher that will point to a problem on the low one. If it is just a little lower then that supports the possibility of just being a clearance adjustment and that would be a good thing.
Compression is within spec limit range to operate in theory, but not necessarily in practice.
 

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All 4 cylinders sounds good, so many guys with 4-cylinder carb problems here lately it's difficult to remember what they look like. Water in fuel; didn't we talk about isopropyl alcohol aka gas line anti-freeze before? If you don't collect the water out of the lowest part of the float bowls the next best is to carry the water through the engine and that takes alcohol. It's not a fix but it is a fuel treatment.
 

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Carb slides can stick, usually because the engine has been run with a history of insufficient air filtration. CV carbs can stick for several reasons if that's what you have.
 

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See the extra plunger pump assembly on a typical #2 carb in a bank of CV carburetors:
Fuel tank Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive tire

My understanding is they put that diaphragm pump on there so the engine returns to idle better, it does it by enriching the fuel mix just slightly on deceleration.
... note the only carb that is different is #2, the rest are virtual parts interchangeable.

Point of this post is, look for something that looks like a fuel pump, study the linkage to determine if that pump is actuated on acceleration or deceleration at the linkage and then look for problems relating to that fuel circuit.
 
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