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Discussion Starter #1
I've used reground cams in cars before that have worked well but not in a bike, specifically my cb500t.

Just got an email back form Delta Cams. They'll regrind the base circle for $65 each on my cams which is significantly better than the mega-cams that I was looking at (or anything else for that matter) cost wise.
As I'm not looking for anything very radical this sounds like a decent way to go to me. Am I missing anything really obvious?
Anyone know the particulars involved with improving the top end oiling?
I've seen pics of the Hansen 450s and I *think* I can figure it out but there's always someone with more info lurking around this joint.....
 

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reground cams are very common with the cb350 race crowd. i know that.

dot know anything about the oiling, or the pumps etc for your particular bike. shit, i dont even know who to send you to for 450 info. tex may know. there will most likely be someone here.

jc
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well at least someone has had good experiences. I just sent a pair of CB450 sticks into Delta, John told me they'd turn them and ship them in one friggin' day! I think I'm going to turn down the sprockets and machine a set of adjustable ones so I can index them properly since my head's being fly-cut 30 thou for a compression boost. Just started porting the head too.....about friggin' time I got on this piece of crap!

Thanks Joe!
 

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Hey I was the guy that started the Delta cams thread on the CB450 group. They did a good job on my cams and gave me a little extra lift and duration than before.

The only warning I have is to assemble the head VERY carefully and note where the adjusters are in their travel. The CB450/500t Valvetrain geometry is very sensitive, and you want to make sure that the little marks on the adjuster shafts point away from the spark plug with the valves adjusted properly. When you regrind the cams and/or followers it changes this relationship and you could end up with the nose of the follower coming off of the end of the valve stem. It also does weird things to wear out the cam lobe and valve guide if the relationship is not right. Be careful. On mine I had to cut the valve stems down .040 and use .060 valve lash caps (available from any good machinist).

If you look closely at the cams you'll notice that the exhaust cam sprocket can be pressed off and back on the cam to change the timing. It's tedious, but you could use that method to tighten or loosen the lobe centers. You cannot swap cams from side-to-side because the lobe profiles are assymetrical in opposite directions. This is another requirement of the weird geometry.

I ran external oiling lines, i'll see if I can remember to get a pic and post it. More for insurance than anything else, because I don't trust the half-assed Honda stock system. Also MAKE SURE you have the little o-ring between the oil pump body and lower case. It's not always there.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Cool, thanks! Any input would be great!
 

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no problem, i need to get new pics anyway.

All the geometry stuff is summarized in the Honda factory shop manual but it doesn't go the extra step and tell you how to change/why to change the geometry. It is also written in really bad japlish so it's not always clear what is going on.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Do you have specs on what they did to your cams and input on retiming?
 

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They never sent me a cam card but I measured them as .030 more lift. A little more duration but I'm not sure how much. I did not change my cam timing but I considered it. I even cut the timing end off of a spare exhaust cam so that I could have dual-adjustable cams. Then I realized that the lobes are ground assymetrical and that won't work. I'm an idiot. :)

In general be very careful that you check piston-valve clearance, things are tight in there.

Here's the external oiling system.

 

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notice you lose the tach drive. It's possible to weld on the tach drive housing instead of doing it the way i did, but it's more tricky.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Shoulda asked in this thread....
Are your cam covers just tapped for the fittings or do you have something inside to direct the flow?
Any pics inside? Also, I'm intrigued by your pitbike wiring....anything you can show on that?

Thanks man!
 

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Nothing directs the flow - nothing needs to. The AN adapters are threaded into female NPT bungs that are in turn welded to the ends of the cam bearings. The internal oil passages in the head i blocked with JB weld, same with the oil passages to the cylinder from the pump.

The pitbike regulator I'll come up with a wiring diagram if you need it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Groovy, thanks!

Hey wait...you sealed up the drain...uhh....huh?

quote:......same with the oil passages to the cylinder from the pump.....
I hadn't paid attention to that portion of the head....help an idiot out?
 

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Inside the head there are two tiny holes that run from the right-side stud holes to the corner of the cam bearing recesses in the head. I plugged those two holes to keep the new pressurized oil from being forced into the original oil passages around the studs.

Down below, oil is fed to those two stud passages by little holes on the deck surface of the top case. These two holes I also plugged. So that's a total of four oil holes I plugged to prevent leaks.
 
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