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Doesnt seem like there is a correlation with helmet laws. Nor does weather seem to matter (texas near the bottom, NH at top). Hmmmm.
 

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I noticed the top 10 are mostly rural states. If you are the only guy in town with a motorcycle and there are 10 people in your town then you are 10% of the population.

Keep in mind this goes by active registrations, not active motorcycle licenses. I wonder what the overlap looks like in those two populations. in NY I knew plenty of people that rode on a permit (ahem...jaguar...cough), or had unregistered motorcycles sitting around. The other guys in HFL for the entire time they lived in NYC didn't own a motorcycle (actually one of them owned one toward the end).
 

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I dont know. For its size, NH has a decent population. and i dont think all those people are jammed into manchester or nashua.
What you really need is another column with pop. density and that might shed some light.
 

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10% of all the bikes in the USA are in Calif. and almost 7% in Fla.Those are the states to look for bikes. Geeto, how many of those bikes are owned by riders with multiple bikes skewing the numbers even more.
 

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I find it interesting the top mc population areas are in snow bound sections of the country.
And I'll bet a good percentage of them are off road type bikes as opposed to states like Calif where there would be a bigger percentage of road bikes.
 

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10% of all the bikes in the USA are in Calif. and almost 7% in Fla.Those are the states to look for bikes. Geeto, how many of those bikes are owned by riders with multiple bikes skewing the numbers even more.
Hard to say...large collections usually have "dealer" plates so it wouldn't even come up. I know with TO there has to be 20-30 bikes but all are race bikes. I think Rob only has one registered street bike.
 

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10% of all the bikes in the USA are in Calif. and almost 7% in Fla.Those are the states to look for bikes. Geeto, how many of those bikes are owned by riders with multiple bikes skewing the numbers even more.
And Texas looks to be about 3rd. But i think most people would guess that the states with more people have more bikes. Ny gets a pass because almost half its population is jammed into 1 city. Whats more interesting is the per capita stat or even a per area stat as I suggested earlier and what the correlations are if any. For example if california was the leader in the per capita stat, then things get interesting (i.e. lane splitting laws)
 

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Ohio outstrips NY in both per capita and sheer volume. Amazing since most of our population is focused in three major cities (CinCi, cBus, and CLand) with mostly farm country and shrinking towns like youngstown and Toledo in between. Also Dayton, but that is a rotating military population.

What doesn't surprise me is that the upper half of the list is predominatly places with lower cost of living. North Dakota, south Dakota, Iowa, Oklahoma, and Idaho are routinely toward the top of the chart in when it comes to cost of living. I guess lower cost of living means more money to spend on toys. I wonder if cars older than 30 years registration and gun ownership shakes out the same way.
 

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these are the states with registration in the 200,000 or more:

4
Wisconsin
317,276
5,691,659
17.9
9
Minnesota
240,288
5,310,658
22.1
13
New Jersey
330,470
8,799,593
26.6
16
Ohio
390,494
11,537,968
29.5
18
Washington
220,856
6,742,950
30.5
19
Pennsylvania
404,164
12,717,722
31.5
20
Indiana
204,402
6,490,622
31.8
23
Michigan
308,338
9,877,143
32.0
24
Florida
574,176
18,838,613
32.8
31
Illinois
350,193
12,841,980
36.7
39
North Carolina
223,209
9,560,234
42.8
43
California
801,803
37,338,198
46.6
47
New York
345,816
19,395,206
56.1
48
Texas
438,551
25,253,466
57.6


Again I think per capita is a marginal way to look at it. I remember one year a 1969 Camaro made the top 10 list of stolen vehicles in Alaska because 2 of them were stolen in the same year.
 

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ok. lets take 2 states with almost the same pop. Maine and NH. why do you think ME has 30,000 less bikes? same weather, both rural.
 

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ok. lets take 2 states with almost the same pop. Maine and NH. why do you think ME has 30,000 less bikes? same weather, both rural.
I've ridden in both. Your bike better have awesome suspension if you're riding in either. My Hayabusa didn't and I broke my aluminum subframe in Portland.

Here is another interesting fact sheet - Motorcycle Fatalities by State (2012) - http://www.ghsa.org/html/publications/pdf/spotlights/motorcycles_2012.pdf
Tx and Fl easily having the most fatalities.
 

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Not that it can be measured but it would be interesting to see bikes per state but not necessarily registered. You could probably guess by assuming 1 to 3 support/parts bikes for anything over 20 years old.
 

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I don't want you all to move here, but it should be becoming clearer that Iowa rules. We also have the most race tracks per capita of anywhere in the nation. I know in the 90s the state did a study of the economic impact of racing. At that time 1 in 750 competed as a driver in an organized racing event at least once a year, my feel is that number hasn't dropped off much since. Add in all the crew guys, engine, chassis builders and you can't throw a dead cat anywhere in the state without hitting a racer or someone actively involved in a support role.

Someone(Geeto) should create a multi-variable equation to explain the level of motorcycle ownership per capita.

My feeling is that income will have positive correlation all the way to the top.

Education, it's my guess, positive correlation until post-grad or doctorate.

Population density, negative correlation at the ends. My feeling; dropping off too sparse, too dense.

Housing affordability. Actually an all-encompassing life affordability variable.

An employment demographic variable. My guess blue collar to mid-level management = positive correlation.

You can plug all that stuff and the things I'm forgetting in develop multipliers for each variable and get it pretty much gnat's ass.

There's probably an app for it. We used to have to do it with pencils and shit.
 

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There is also a positive correlation between Medical doctors hooked on opiates and motorcycle ownership.
 
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