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So this weekend the wife and I hopped on the Buell and headed south to IL for a cookout with the fam. Had a great time and parted ways.

We decided to take some back roads on the way home becasue my wife doesn't like riding on the freeway.

We were just 5 miles into WI and the bike started to lug real bad and the back end wasn't griping for shit. About 1000ft in front of us a light turned red, so I clicked down to 4th and eased the clutch out. When I did that the back tire decided it didn't want to go straight any more. So I grab a handful of front brake and forced the bike into a gas station parking lot.

Coming to a stop I went to put the kickstand down and found that the bike was so low that I couldn't even get the stand underneath it.

The aroma of abused and deflated tire began to fill my helmet. So there we sat with a 2 inch gash in the rear tire.

Luckily my fam didn't drink too much during the hockey game and were able to mobilize quickly.

I am wondering is this how rear tires usually feel when they go? This is the first time I have EVER had a flat tire (car, bike, anything).

Once I pulled a friends sv 650 out of the garage with an unknown flat front and it felt as if the bars just wanted to slap the tank.
 

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I would say you got really lucky as it could have been way more violent.

Feel all depends on how the tire goes, but generally loss of control like you are riding on ice is common to most.

If the tire violently goes like in a defect that causes a bubble to form and pop or a massive and quick tread seperation/delamination, the tire is disentengrating underneath you and the "slick" feeling is probably the last thing you will feel before you feel the pavement.

If there is a rapid deflation, like a piece of debris puts a big hole in your tire the feeling will creep up on you and you may get a pulling sensation. Yes the bike will lug at first since traction increases as the crown collapses and the tire begins to rub and drag before the slick feeling sets in as the structure collapses.

If it is a slow seperation or a slower leak, the tire will rumble like a wheel is out of balance before the avove stuff happens.
 

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Two weeks ago I was violently ejected off a bike that had never shaken its head prior

Cause? 18psi front and 10 rear

It hurt and thankfully I was dresssed

A blowout on either end can be quite catastrophic.
 

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Glad you're safe. My wife is just starting to ride. She gives me a hard time about wearing a full face helmet and a jacket, but shit happens on the road, and I would rather she keep her skin, and her life. Again, just be thankful you were able to get the cycle off the road safely. It could have been much worse.
 

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Your lucky not to have the bike gone out of control. Just recently one of my buds had a rear tire blow out at 150mph (don't ask). It seems the rubber valve stem was ripped out of the back rim at that speed. He didn't go down but it did make and interesting ride for him. The initial tire swap to one side had destroyed one of the rear shocks on the bike. If it wasn't for his incredible ridding skill or dumb luck he should have been sliding down the highway on his ass. I have the split valve stem and plan to mount it on a plaque to mount in his shop with the words "You are one Lucky SOB"
 

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I lost a rear tire at 70+ on my old /5 beemer. I was on the super slab and the bike was perfectly vertical. rear started to weave a little, then a lot. I had already slowed up quite a bit when it completely failed. pulled off and took a look. the entire episode from highway cruise to getting off, took about 15-20 seconds. I patched the tube, guy on a gold wing let me use his compressor and I was back on the road. mid corner riding pretty aggressively would have been another story. glad you're ok. cheers, bcr
 
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