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Discussion Starter #1
I want to buy an older BMW this year for a commuter/ light touring bike. I was thinking one of the R75 bikes. I don't care about the styling or how collectable it is although I like the looks of the toaster tank ones. Are some more reliable than others? More parts for certain ones?

I guess what I am asking is which ones should I be researching? I am 5' 10" 180lbs and I am thinking in the $3000 range.

Not set on the BMW for touring around the northwest so if you have a better idea let me know.
 

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I hear from just about every one of my friends that the /6 and later are better bikes. They usually tell me this any time I consider buying a /5.
 

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I hear from just about every one of my friends that the /6 and later are better bikes. They usually tell me this any time I consider buying a /5.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm thinking parts availability will be a big thing too. I have a great BMW shop here but not so sure about finding stuff in the middle of nowhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm thinking parts availability will be a big thing too. I have a great BMW shop here but not so sure about finding stuff in the middle of nowhere.
 

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For long distance touring, go with an R90/6. Pretty much the same chassis as a R75, but a few more horsies and an extra gear in the gearbox.

No real advantage to the R75 that I know of, except that some R75s came with the neato toaster tank. You can put a toaster tank on a R90, but to make it fit, you have to move the master cylinder from the frame tube to the handlebars.

If you get an R-bike, check the final drive ratio shown on the rear hub, and make sure the ratio is suited for your intended use. For a long open-road tour I would want the 34/11 hub (the tallest ratio available). If your tour will involve a lot of mountains (a tour of colorado), maybe a 33/11 would be best. 32/10 is good for around town, and short tours. I think there is a lower ratio, too, for sidecar bikes.
 

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For long distance touring, go with an R90/6. Pretty much the same chassis as a R75, but a few more horsies and an extra gear in the gearbox.

No real advantage to the R75 that I know of, except that some R75s came with the neato toaster tank. You can put a toaster tank on a R90, but to make it fit, you have to move the master cylinder from the frame tube to the handlebars.

If you get an R-bike, check the final drive ratio shown on the rear hub, and make sure the ratio is suited for your intended use. For a long open-road tour I would want the 34/11 hub (the tallest ratio available). If your tour will involve a lot of mountains (a tour of colorado), maybe a 33/11 would be best. 32/10 is good for around town, and short tours. I think there is a lower ratio, too, for sidecar bikes.
 

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