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Discussion Starter #1
is there any reason i cant turn my own rotors on my lathe??

jc
 

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hmm..dont see why not..may want to measure the thickness first to make sure you have enough for the enitial turn, and some extra incase it doesn't turn out so good. As long as its an even flat cut and the rotor stays balanced, it should work.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thats what i was thinking. my rotors are 120 bucks a side. so i figured a few minutes on the lathe wasnt going to kill me. easier than putting it on stands, than taking them someplace.

j
 

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$120 per side? I just had mine done (Ford Ranger) i think i paid $10 per rotor. If you meant $12 then just let the shop do it.
 

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I think thats the replacement price...I hope...it averages around 10-20 bucks to have rotors turned, any higher price and your paying to much. It usually takes about 20min a rotor. I just take mine to O'Reilly's, drop them off, get lunch and pic them up and pay my 40 bucks to have all four done.
 

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because they will vibrate/chatter if you do not dampen them and cut both sides at the same time

both sides must also be parallel so the only way to do this is to use a brake lathe
 

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unless you can rig up two fully adjustable cutters on your cross slide

then all you need is that lead weighted rubber band for it's diameter
 

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Joe,

It can be done but it's a pain in the ass. First you need mount the rotor and indicate, on the lathe, the part of the rotor that faces on the truck's spindle to probably .0005" (maybe more but check the spec for total runout). Then without moving anything cut one face. If you can change the cutting tool to face the other side of the rotor without dis-mounting it then you don't need to re-indicate and just face making sure you don't thin the rotor to less than the min spec. If you can't and have to flip the rotor over then you need to indicate to the already cut side to .0005" (or less) and cut. It's a bunch of time and the reason why brake lathes were invented.

Have fun,

Mike O.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
ok, i thought itd just be a matter of indicating of the flat spindle area, flatening one side, then flipping it, squaring it again, then flattening the other side.

cheapo replacements are about 120 per side. i bought em new last time, and then proceeded to gouge them in new jersey. then drove home not wanting ot do a brake job at the track.

ive been riding the bike ever since. hmmmmmm guess its off to the shop with em. i just dont have a good place to leave my truck on stands. oh well.

thanks for the info guys. as always, good advice.

jc
 

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look up the spec for parallelism for your rotors

some spec at 0.0002"

and for sure 0.001" out of parallel will leave you with brakes that work ok, don't really pulsate like warped rotors will

but will knock the pistons back into the calipers as you are going down the road so maybe when you apply the brakes on the interstate

the pedal may go nearly or all the way to the floor until you pump them back up but they won't feel right at all

I have a Harrison M300 copy and a good one, I've never been able to nail one to within 0.0002" parallel even when not flipping it so I stopped trying

and it's really hard to measure even 0.0005" parallel but 0.0002" is a beaotch to measure even with a proper micrometer for the job

but when I had the ammaco brake lathe...... it would just nail it every time
 

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WTF kind of car are you driving that uses $120 per side rotors? I always just chuck mine in the bin after a few track events. Can't you get them turned for $12 or so per side at the local AutoZone?

--Chris
 
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