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The 4-pot I have as spare is a Beta brake, it was manufactured by AJP and AJP now makes the same brake under the name Braktec. The newest versions are monoblock designed, although personally I prefer the earlier model that is bolted together because they are way easier to service then the mono block. The 4-pots ride on the front of the fork leg by convention but not because of a design requirement.

Google up "Braktec.com" they are the major producer of hydraulic brake parts for dirt bikes. They make both the callipers and the master cylinder lever sets as well as rear brake sets. The same brake is used all almost all trials bikes made including Montesa, TRS, Sherco, Beta, Gasgas and Vertigo for the last 20 years. The 2-pot Braktec makes for enduro and MX bikes will fit on nearly all of the euro enduro bikes including KTM, Husqvarna, Gasgas, Beta and more.

If I was going to offer something as a kit, I'd be either replacing or turning the original disc down to fit the brake. A bracket would not be too difficult for the 4-pot that mounts with only 2 bolts, the 2-pot enduro bikes use 3 mount bolts and have 2 different bolt patterns, the 2-P brake normally fits on the trailing side of a USD fork.

Given a choice between a one finger front brake and a brake that is inadequate to be safe, I'll go for the one finger brake because I learned how to not slide the front tire or accidentally nose wheelie a very long time ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Man I just took a peak at braktec, looks like really nice high quality equipment, especially the reservoir levers. But with that comes high prices. Add a new disk to it (which the right thing to do would be to take a piece of stainless steel round stock, probably 10-12" diameter, and have it lathed and milled to a precise shape that fits the original mounting bolts) and you would have a front brake unmatched by any vintage rebuild. But just the price of stainless steel... Oooo sends shivers down my spine 馃槺

999 out of 1000 people are gonna look for an economy option. But I see you have fine taste for motorcycles, way outta my budget lol
 

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Man I just took a peak at braktec, looks like really nice high quality equipment, especially the reservoir levers. But with that comes high prices. Add a new disk to it (which the right thing to do would be to take a piece of stainless steel round stock, probably 10-12" diameter, and have it lathed and milled to a precise shape that fits the original mounting bolts) and you would have a front brake unmatched by any vintage rebuild. But just the price of stainless steel... Oooo sends shivers down my spine 馃槺

999 out of 1000 people are gonna look for an economy option. But I see you have fine taste for motorcycles, way outta my budget lol
Yep, world class state of the art technology. I have expensive taste in motorcycles, I like them made of titanium and designed to burn race fuel, and everything has to work like my life depends on it because it usually does end up depending on it. :D Perfect day riding here today I was doing some rider training, still no bugs yet and traction was excellent. Love this time of year :cool:
 

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Hi, I just read this thread today and remembered a SOHC 750 Honda cafe racer my friend got a few years back. I had been converted to disk back in the day. It looked loke they used a front caliper on the back wheel mounted to a 1/4 " plate. I think the front was that way too, I don't know why since they came with disks on the front already? I only have a picture of the back wheel. I never saw it work and can't say how good it was? Here's a picture.
Wheel Tire Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tread
 

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Note; they used a front wheel on the back and made an adaptor to mount the sprocket.
 

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lastly, if you want to use stock Honda parts, CMX250 Hondas have a hydraulic disk brake that might swap?
 

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They are all over ebay. Obviously you will need an adapter/bracket to mount it. I would suggest the stock caliper mount which is behind the fork leg plus one lower down such as the stock fender mount just behind the axle. If that doesn't work there are other sliding caliper twin piston calipers around at low prices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I actually found a lever and caliper that works for me, just gotta get around to making my template for the bracket and then fabricating it. Its gonna happen, just that motorcycle season is in and I can suffer a squeaky brake for enjoying the ride at the moment
 
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