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quote:Originally posted by Geeto67

Asking questions that have multiple answers and expecting one answer is not going to help you. So let's run back to the project planning stage for a second.

(snip)

As with anything nobody is gonna write you instructions. It isn't fair to us or to you who needs to learn not just how to do custom work but how to be brave enough to plunge into custom work with little more than a well reasoned idea of how it goes together.
That was a great explanation. Kudos.

My CB360 stock, single-puck caliper is more than enough for hard stops. My long-ago GT350 had a drum brake and I seem to recall it worked pretty well.
 

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Personally, I find CB360 disc brakes barely adequate, could possibly be my riding style though ;)
 

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Personally, I find CB360 disc brakes barely adequate, could possibly be my riding style though ;)
 

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My single pot, single disc front on my GS550 will cause wheel skip and, finally, front wheel 'drifting' any time I want on very good rubber. I know the honda discs aren't quite as powerful, but pretty sure I could do the same nearly as easily on any of em.
 

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My single pot, single disc front on my GS550 will cause wheel skip and, finally, front wheel 'drifting' any time I want on very good rubber. I know the honda discs aren't quite as powerful, but pretty sure I could do the same nearly as easily on any of em.
 

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quote:Originally posted by kenessex

Geeto,
I still contend that a properly set up drum is not as crappy as you think. Have you ever actually ridden a 350/360 with a properly set up ( adjusted, bedded, lubed) front drum? I agree that most drums and single piston disc brakes are crappy.

Ken
Yes I have. Many times. And T500 drums, and BMW drums, and triumph drums.

When it comes down it I would rather have a dual disc than a drum for 2 reasons:

1) much easier to service. If both have been standing for 15 years obviously the drum is easier to get back to functional, but in terms of service on a system that is in regular weekend use - the disc setup doesn't require me to remove the wheel to change pads, the fluid is easy to change out with a length of hose and a 10mm wrench (instead of a drum brake tool), and the parts are much easier to get.

2) easier to improve. For me to make the drum better I need to know someone who can reline drums, I need to have a basic understanding of how levers work, understand how spring rates work, understand how to tune in brake drag. for me to mod disc brakes, there is all of that, plus little projects that don't require as much knowledge like braided lines and disc drilling. Each has its own science, but something about discs feels easier to understand since, well drums are a dying art.
 

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quote:Originally posted by kenessex

Geeto,
I still contend that a properly set up drum is not as crappy as you think. Have you ever actually ridden a 350/360 with a properly set up ( adjusted, bedded, lubed) front drum? I agree that most drums and single piston disc brakes are crappy.

Ken
Yes I have. Many times. And T500 drums, and BMW drums, and triumph drums.

When it comes down it I would rather have a dual disc than a drum for 2 reasons:

1) much easier to service. If both have been standing for 15 years obviously the drum is easier to get back to functional, but in terms of service on a system that is in regular weekend use - the disc setup doesn't require me to remove the wheel to change pads, the fluid is easy to change out with a length of hose and a 10mm wrench (instead of a drum brake tool), and the parts are much easier to get.

2) easier to improve. For me to make the drum better I need to know someone who can reline drums, I need to have a basic understanding of how levers work, understand how spring rates work, understand how to tune in brake drag. for me to mod disc brakes, there is all of that, plus little projects that don't require as much knowledge like braided lines and disc drilling. Each has its own science, but something about discs feels easier to understand since, well drums are a dying art.
 

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I have searched here and many other places for a how to guide to putting a dual disc setup on a cb350, but I have had no luck. I know this is probably a fairly common upgrade for these bikes but I have no idea exactly what the process is or what parts are required. Most of the posts I have read say you can use cb550 triple trees/forks? but since they didn't come with dual discs I still don't understand how they work.

Can anyone lay it out for me? Go ahead and assume I'm a dumbass (I'm sure you will anyway). Or point me to a post where my question has already been answered.

Thanks!
Were you able to find a solution?
I'm Sure the Rotors could be cut/lightened so with the aluminum rim, titanium spokes and axle might just even out ?
Looking for a mild cam upgrade, valves/springs/keepers if anyone has a source
 

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Were you able to find a solution?
I'm Sure the Rotors could be cut/lightened so with the aluminum rim, titanium spokes and axle might just even out ?
Looking for a mild cam upgrade, valves/springs/keepers if anyone has a source
Did you even read this decade old thread? :unsure: Your request for a mild cam is going to be lost in confusion, best to start a new topic for your new problem, tell us about what you have to work with and then we can give you the bad news.
 

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Were you able to find a solution?
I'm Sure the Rotors could be cut/lightened so with the aluminum rim, titanium spokes and axle might just even out ?
Looking for a mild cam upgrade, valves/springs/keepers if anyone has a source
Hi. Welcome onboard. As has been pointed out, you are replying to an eleven year old thread. Best to start a new thread about what it is that you are looking for.
 
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