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Discussion Starter #1
<img src="Greetings. I posted this on the SOHC forum also.
I'm about to begin a pseudo-cafe conversion on my '74 350F (pseudo meaning drag bars instead of clubmans, stock seat instead of solo seat).
My goal is to create a lower profile ala' 60's-era Brit bikes (BSA, Triumph, etc.)
Kind of like this (but with larger tires):
http://i87.photobucket.com/albums/k153/johnnybalmer/CafeIdea.jpg" border=0>
In order to achieve this, I'm thinking I need shorter shocks/forks and larger rims/tires. Currently, everything is stock. I'd like to replace the 18 inch rims and tires with something wider and larger. 20 inch?
As far as shocks go, does anyone know if these will work?
[url]http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=170159701995&ru=http%3A%2F%2Fmotors.search.ebay.com%3A80%2F%3Ffrom%3DR40%26satitle%3D170159701995%26fvi%3D1[/url]
Also, I spoke with someone at Frank's Forks here in Chicago about cutting the stock forks.
I know I'll need to be mindful of how much clearance I have available when making these decisions.
I'm just looking for any input/advice anyone can offer as I plan this out.
Thanks in advance.

1974 CB350F
1965 Lambretta Li150
2003 Stella
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Greetings. I posted this on the SOHC forum also.
I'm about to begin a pseudo-cafe conversion on my '74 350F (pseudo meaning drag bars instead of clubmans, stock seat instead of solo seat).
My goal is to create a lower profile ala' 60's-era Brit bikes (BSA, Triumph, etc.)
Kind of like this (but with larger tires):

In order to achieve this, I'm thinking I need shorter shocks/forks and larger rims/tires. Currently, everything is stock. I'd like to replace the 18 inch rims and tires with something wider and larger. 20 inch?
As far as shocks go, does anyone know if these will work?
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/e...y.com:80/?from=R40&satitle=170159701995&fvi=1
Also, I spoke with someone at Frank's Forks here in Chicago about cutting the stock forks.
I know I'll need to be mindful of how much clearance I have available when making these decisions.
I'm just looking for any input/advice anyone can offer as I plan this out.
Thanks in advance.

1974 CB350F
1965 Lambretta Li150
2003 Stella
[/quote]

1974 CB350F
1965 Lambretta Li150
2003 Stella
 

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Johnny,
I don't think you would want to go with bigger rims or shortened up suspension other than maybe sliding the fork tubes up in the triple clamps a little. Maybe 1/2 inch or so. More than that will look goofy and you don't have that much ground clearance anyway. This will quicken up the steering a little but a bigger tire on the front will slow it back down some to. I would put a steering damper on it anyway. The shocks have a clevis mount on the bottom not an eye. I would not use too much shorter socks either. I think if you are going to throw some money at it then I would get some wider polished alloy rims WM4 rear and WM3 front. Then lace them up with heavier gauge stainless spokes. Put a 130/90 18 Bridgestone BT45 on the rear and a 110/90 - 18 BT45 on the front and you should have close to the look like the pic you posted. I agree with your plan for the drag bars and stock seat although I kind of like the look of a smooth seat with a little kick up at the rear.

Good luck,
Ken

AHRMA 412
Vintage racing - old guys on old bikes
 

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If you're trying to get to where that bike is in the pic, I don't think you need to do any of what you just described. As far as I can tell, beyond updated tires, that bike's suspension is stock. In fact, that bike could be made out of a stocker in an afternoon...

- 4-2 turned out pipes (kind of ugly imho)
- clubmans
- british license mount on front fender
- number stencil on blacked sidecover
- stripped tank with missing emblems

Let's be honest, it's not the bike that's cool, it's the photograph.

The other reason I think the suspension's stock: who swaps the front end and lowers the shocks but doesn't bother to lose that hideous brake light or ugly-ass gauges? Furthermore, they pulled the forks but didn't bother to install clip-ons? Hmmm...
 

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quote: - 4-2 turned out pipes (kind of ugly imho)
Amen. Why do people put these on their bikes? Looks like a part off a Peterbuilt tractor.
It is the photo that's cool, not the bike - Though I don't have much room to speak.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The photo is just a jumping off point. What I like about the bike is the lower profile, stock seat and other details like the pedestrian slicer. I know when some folks say they want to build a cafe racer, they simply throw on clubmans and a fiberglass solo seat. I thought this was more of a practical solution for a bike that will be my daily inner city rider.
Thanks for the suggestions.
Maybe I am seduced more by the photograph than the actual bike...

1974 CB350F
1965 Lambretta Li150
2003 Stella
 

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johnny man
i would strongly resist the temptation to alter the wheel size...particularly the diameter. beside looking goofy, larger tires will change the handling for the worse, make your bike slower, and cost a lot of money better spent on go fast/look good things.
just my humble opinion.
-parks
 

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I see I missed the headlight visor, so add ten minutes to my previous estimate.

I fully support your thoughts on the seat - I don't usually care for the glass seat myself, but maybe that's just because I've looked at too many stock bikes with clubmans and glass humps. That's not a racer. That there's a commuter bike with an uncomfortable seating position.

I say your money's better spent with clip-ons, rearsets, and upswept exhaust. Then the girls will think you're cool and the cafe people won't make fun of you.

Second thought on seats: giuliari's are beautiful - similar shape but stock materials. I really need to find someone in Boston who can make one for me.
 
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