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i have my bike stripped down to motor, frame, forks, wheels and the wiring is basically still there. i am worried about the wiring. i am trying to take all of the wiring off at the same time in one big piece so i dont have to label or remember every connection. i would like to get a second bike as a reference. i got this old cb360T for $100 and it only has 5500 miles on it. it has sat for a long time and doesnt run at the moment. i guess i will worry about that later. i plan to have the frame powder coated, but i have never had anything powder coated before. i also want to relocate the rear sets and shave a lot of weight. before i have the frame powder coated, i would like to grind the frame smooth of all the peices of metal that were used to hold brackets and arent needed any more. i probably should have done more research on this before i started but i was anxious. this all said, any advice would be awesome. i will be posting some pics periodically, but its going to be an all winter long project. any tips/advice would be greatly appreciated.

'75 CB360T
 

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wowie...ok, first, youll need to cut all the crap off. so get to work doing that. i found a chisel was great for taking alot of the tabs etc off. (a metal chisle) while youre at it, start thinking about what color you want it. the powder coatings that are out there are unreal now. some very cool shit. and dont forget your swing arm. be sure to have everything done before you send it out. youll need to have it sandblasted both before you start welding on it, and after, but before it goes to the coater. talk to your coater and welder to find out exactly what they want. but ive found welders want the shit blasted before theyll weld on it, and coaters have to blast before they coat. dont bother masking or blocking anything for yourt coater, they have special stuff they use and wont want anything contaminating thier oven. the most important thing to remember is that once its coated, you ahve to have everything done to it. once its coated, its a pain in the ass to add anything. so really, mock up as much as you can beofre you send it out to get coated. that way if you miss somthing, ot need to add that bracket here or there, you can.

is this for a street bike??? im guessing it is>

JC
 

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wowie...ok, first, youll need to cut all the crap off. so get to work doing that. i found a chisel was great for taking alot of the tabs etc off. (a metal chisle) while youre at it, start thinking about what color you want it. the powder coatings that are out there are unreal now. some very cool shit. and dont forget your swing arm. be sure to have everything done before you send it out. youll need to have it sandblasted both before you start welding on it, and after, but before it goes to the coater. talk to your coater and welder to find out exactly what they want. but ive found welders want the shit blasted before theyll weld on it, and coaters have to blast before they coat. dont bother masking or blocking anything for yourt coater, they have special stuff they use and wont want anything contaminating thier oven. the most important thing to remember is that once its coated, you ahve to have everything done to it. once its coated, its a pain in the ass to add anything. so really, mock up as much as you can beofre you send it out to get coated. that way if you miss somthing, ot need to add that bracket here or there, you can.

is this for a street bike??? im guessing it is>

JC
 

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quote:
i am worried about the wiring. i am trying to take all of the wiring off at the same time in one big piece so i dont have to label or remember every connection.

'75 CB360T
Quit being a baby, get out the masking tape and a sharpie and just do it. Get a wiring diagram for your bike as a back up and make a lot of notes, otherwise you don't learn anything. This isn't just a project it is school bub.

This is one of those things that bogs a project down - too much time thinking about cutting corners and in the end you have nothing. By the time this bike goes back together you will have the wiring diagram memorized. By labeling everything you are actually interacting with the wiring and seeing how everything gets power - if you do it where you are just copying a second bike you have learned naught and spent a lot of money.
 

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quote:
i am worried about the wiring. i am trying to take all of the wiring off at the same time in one big piece so i dont have to label or remember every connection.

'75 CB360T
Quit being a baby, get out the masking tape and a sharpie and just do it. Get a wiring diagram for your bike as a back up and make a lot of notes, otherwise you don't learn anything. This isn't just a project it is school bub.

This is one of those things that bogs a project down - too much time thinking about cutting corners and in the end you have nothing. By the time this bike goes back together you will have the wiring diagram memorized. By labeling everything you are actually interacting with the wiring and seeing how everything gets power - if you do it where you are just copying a second bike you have learned naught and spent a lot of money.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
really? i didnt think i would be able to remember all the wiring. that is a good point about knowing how everything gets power. I am convinced that i will go that route. i have the clymer manual. is the wiring diagram in there as good as it gets? i think it makes sense but it seems like there could be a better diagram somewhere. Im not sure what is meant by the tabs to be chiseled off. i plann to make the frame as smooth as i can. i am pretty sure that i need to put the bike together the way i want it before the paint/coating process, but i still need to do a ton of research on rear sets, seat, tank, forks, handle bars, suspension, wheels, tires, and guages. not to mention the paint scheme. the only inspiration i have is the pics i see on the internet and the fact that i cant wait to ride this thing. i wish i had a cafe racer community here in oklahoma that is there in the NE. I have never even seen a cafe racer bike in person, and i am trying something way beyond my current skill level. i want this project to turn out well, even though its a learning project. that way my next project will be even better and smoother. thanks for the advice guys. im sure i will be seeking more in the near future.



'75 CB360T
 

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Discussion Starter #7
really? i didnt think i would be able to remember all the wiring. that is a good point about knowing how everything gets power. I am convinced that i will go that route. i have the clymer manual. is the wiring diagram in there as good as it gets? i think it makes sense but it seems like there could be a better diagram somewhere. Im not sure what is meant by the tabs to be chiseled off. i plann to make the frame as smooth as i can. i am pretty sure that i need to put the bike together the way i want it before the paint/coating process, but i still need to do a ton of research on rear sets, seat, tank, forks, handle bars, suspension, wheels, tires, and guages. not to mention the paint scheme. the only inspiration i have is the pics i see on the internet and the fact that i cant wait to ride this thing. i wish i had a cafe racer community here in oklahoma that is there in the NE. I have never even seen a cafe racer bike in person, and i am trying something way beyond my current skill level. i want this project to turn out well, even though its a learning project. that way my next project will be even better and smoother. thanks for the advice guys. im sure i will be seeking more in the near future.



'75 CB360T
 

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Get a 4" angle grinder for smoothing out your frame once you've chiseled off the offending tabs. And read this guy:

http://www.totalmotorcycle.com/BBS/viewtopic.php?t=5844&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0&sid=51eb2ae0e402c39031f2d820baafde50

He did a nice cb360, and has lots of pics.
You should probably get it running (well) before you completely disassemble it/remove the wiring. you're going to have to do it at some point, and you may as well find out what that'll take before you spend a lot of money on powdercoating & fancy seats & gas tanks.
 

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Get a 4" angle grinder for smoothing out your frame once you've chiseled off the offending tabs. And read this guy:

http://www.totalmotorcycle.com/BBS/viewtopic.php?t=5844&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0&sid=51eb2ae0e402c39031f2d820baafde50

He did a nice cb360, and has lots of pics.
You should probably get it running (well) before you completely disassemble it/remove the wiring. you're going to have to do it at some point, and you may as well find out what that'll take before you spend a lot of money on powdercoating & fancy seats & gas tanks.
 

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quote:
really? i didnt think i would be able to remember all the wiring. that is a good point about knowing how everything gets power. I am convinced that i will go that route. i have the clymer manual. is the wiring diagram in there as good as it gets? i think it makes sense but it seems like there could be a better diagram somewhere. Im not sure what is meant by the tabs to be chiseled off. i plann to make the frame as smooth as i can. i am pretty sure that i need to put the bike together the way i want it before the paint/coating process, but i still need to do a ton of research on rear sets, seat, tank, forks, handle bars, suspension, wheels, tires, and guages. not to mention the paint scheme. the only inspiration i have is the pics i see on the internet and the fact that i cant wait to ride this thing. i wish i had a cafe racer community here in oklahoma that is there in the NE. I have never even seen a cafe racer bike in person, and i am trying something way beyond my current skill level. i want this project to turn out well, even though its a learning project. that way my next project will be even better and smoother. thanks for the advice guys. im sure i will be seeking more in the near future.



'75 CB360T
Sometimes the honda diagram is better, sometimes worse - all depends on the model. Using the clymer one as a base you can make your own diagram tracing the wires back through the bike. This will give you a great idea about what you really need and what you can get rid of. Also it will help you chase out weak spots like wires that have been spliced badly or worn through. Make repairs as you go and this will save you a lot of trouble shooting time later.

As you go you'll notice that there are certain things you can replace like the coils and the regulator and rectifier with more modern stuff. I don't know how crazy you are getting with your bike but there may come a point where you want to build your own harness - expirence with the old one will help you with that.

When you label the wires make sure you label what is hot and what is ground as well as what they go to. Spend a good two hours on it and you'll be surprised what you learn about bike electrics.
 

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quote:
really? i didnt think i would be able to remember all the wiring. that is a good point about knowing how everything gets power. I am convinced that i will go that route. i have the clymer manual. is the wiring diagram in there as good as it gets? i think it makes sense but it seems like there could be a better diagram somewhere. Im not sure what is meant by the tabs to be chiseled off. i plann to make the frame as smooth as i can. i am pretty sure that i need to put the bike together the way i want it before the paint/coating process, but i still need to do a ton of research on rear sets, seat, tank, forks, handle bars, suspension, wheels, tires, and guages. not to mention the paint scheme. the only inspiration i have is the pics i see on the internet and the fact that i cant wait to ride this thing. i wish i had a cafe racer community here in oklahoma that is there in the NE. I have never even seen a cafe racer bike in person, and i am trying something way beyond my current skill level. i want this project to turn out well, even though its a learning project. that way my next project will be even better and smoother. thanks for the advice guys. im sure i will be seeking more in the near future.



'75 CB360T
Sometimes the honda diagram is better, sometimes worse - all depends on the model. Using the clymer one as a base you can make your own diagram tracing the wires back through the bike. This will give you a great idea about what you really need and what you can get rid of. Also it will help you chase out weak spots like wires that have been spliced badly or worn through. Make repairs as you go and this will save you a lot of trouble shooting time later.

As you go you'll notice that there are certain things you can replace like the coils and the regulator and rectifier with more modern stuff. I don't know how crazy you are getting with your bike but there may come a point where you want to build your own harness - expirence with the old one will help you with that.

When you label the wires make sure you label what is hot and what is ground as well as what they go to. Spend a good two hours on it and you'll be surprised what you learn about bike electrics.
 
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