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Discussion Starter #1
whats up guys!? , just picked up a cb500k. wondering, what front end with dual disks is the easiest to bolt up ? anyone have any links or info will be a HUGE help.
 

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Nothing is easy - otherwise everyone would be doing it. Aside from all that - a honda cb750 front end should work with the cb500. I'm not sure if the 750 forks will bolt onto your existing triple trees - you may have to change them out also...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
okay thats what i understand, is that the WHOLE front end is going to have to be replaced, i guess my next question for who ever might know is, Will the steering stem fit without modification? OR, am i looking at what ever front end i choose im going to have to use the stock stem on the new triples?
 

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What is it you really want to do here? Cuz with the info you provided there are about 100 ways I can answer your question.

Also how much skill do you have, cuz the people who ask rarely have the skills/resources to do what they want.

You can make your existing front end dual disc, but your speedo stops working
 

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Over on the SOHC4 forums, the dual-disk process on stock forks is discussed in heated detail. There is even discussion about the speedo.

I wouldn't call it a consensus, but some people think that the extra weight of the Honda brake parts for the second disk isn't worth it - those stock rotors are very heavy. Those people opt to drill the single front rotor instead. You should search here for drilled rotors, I know this has been discussed.

I don't have an opinion on dual-disk - my 450 has a single CB900F caliper and slotted rotor, and stops the bike just fine. I bet if you drill the rotor properly and add good stainless brake lines (see pampadori here for those same lines) your brakes will stop you on a dime. That's what I'm planning to do on my CB750.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
okay so sounds like keep the single and drill it... what i was hopin for was a simple answer, something along the lines of "oh grab a 550f front end and slap that bitch on there" haha
 

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oh, grab a cb750F 77-78 front end, slide it into your trees, and then watch as everybody makes fun of your comstar front and spoke rear. even then you still may have to modify spacing and shit. and NO there is no spoke wheel that will fit that front end easily.

when dealing with 1970's japanese bikes there is no such thing as a simple answer. they basically took technology that GP cars weren't even using at the time and overbuilt it and made it reliable for the street. When Honda put discs on their bikes everybody else was still using drums, everybody was using pushrods and these bikes had OHCs and cam chains.
 

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when I asked what you want to get out of this it was more along the lines of do you want better forks? better brakes? the look of a modern wheel? better tire sizes? you dig?

there is a GL1000 swap but the front end is kind of overkill for a cb500/550. you need everything from the clamps to the brakes, to the wheel, the forks will be too long, and you'll need to make new steering stops but it is the most overkill that is bolt on that I can think of.

there are charts out there that list neck bearing sizes. see what other modern bikes share a bottom bearing size with your cb550 neck, the top you can always shim and spacer but that will get you started.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thanks for the response geeto, but yea what i was looking for in this front end would to just help the handling and braking a bit. mostly the braking im concerned with, and figured while im at it why not try to make it dual? but as i see now its not going to be as easy as i was hoping, im just going to stick with the 1 and drill it. thanks for the responses guys
 
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