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Discussion Starter #21
I like this new guy, can we keep him?


i assume the MK3 Refers to some sort of Volkswagen?
Worse, toyota supras... :-\
 

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Looking good, I too am working on a 750f. Keeping mine more stock with a few performance updates and some cosmetic updates. Is a 900c bike a bit much for a first time rider?
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Looking good, I too am working on a 750f. Keeping mine more stock with a few performance updates and some cosmetic updates. Is a 900c bike a bit much for a first time rider?
That's something I contemplated, for several months.
On one hand, the response from these bikes is nothing like a fuel injected bike.
I used to own a Kawasaki 636 that was just ridiculous, breaking traction in 2nd 1/2 throttle.

In my experience, these bikes are nowhere as unforgiving at the low end that a sensible person (girlfriend) couldn't ride it safely.
Now, if you lay into them... my GS750E will turn into a demon.

My gf has passed the MSF course, and her license, so I think she'll be okay. She won't be riding without me either, so I'm not going to let her get into any trouble if I can help it.

But I hear you.
There's a difference here... I've never ridden a CB900, so I may be totally wrong.
 

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900sare surprisingly fast for a 30 year old Bike. And pretty heavy. I liked the balance of mine though but may not be a great starter bike for a female.
 

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I agree with joep7 , the 900 is fast enough, but I was wondering about the weight.

Anyway,mk3 Brent, I have enjoyed your build picks. Very good photos, I really liked how you valve cover turned out. Awesome!
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Thanks guys, I'll test the bike/girl out. ;)

She's a tough cookie... she's one of those crossfit, brazilian jiu jitsu practitioners.

Maybe I'll put her on a scooter for a year or something. haha

 

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Well if you care for her definitely upgrade brakes and suspension. Both are....meh. SS lines, new shocks for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Well if you care for her definitely upgrade brakes and suspension. Both are....meh. SS lines, new shocks for sure.
These brake lines are most likely teflon, and should be more than adequate. (brand new at that.)

What rear suspension choices should I research?
Something for everyday riding would be ideal.
 

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progressive makes some decent rear shocks. you want them for an "f" not a "c". c is shorter and makes the handling depressing even with good parts. Be on heavy lookout for an "f" wheel and trailing arm. that gives you the larger rear wheel and a disc out back.

the CR carbs properly tuned will surprise you when snapped to the stop on a 900 mill. Throw some cams at it and she (and possibly you...) will have all the bike and motor you really want to handle in that frame. You do need to locate non leading axle forks. A set of CBR forks and brakes could have saved you a bit of clean up and grief.
 

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btw you have a 900f engine. 900c engines were shaft drive with a subtransmission.
 
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btw you have a 900f engine. 900c engines were shaft drive with a subtransmission.
yeah so yours is about 40 pounds lighter to start with :).

the benefit if SS brake lines is they don't flex out when you squeeze the lever. 900 and 750 brakes can be be pretty spongey and this helps to control that a bit.

Hagon or progressive suspension are the economical shock route for great shocks. Don't forget about the fronts tho. Those forks need a rebuild too! New springs and seals most likely. You can get those at Hagen too I believe.
 

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Last year a project at work required some testing with amphenol/circular interconnect cables.
In the end, I had several left over that were heading for the trash can.

Maybe I can use them for the bike.
Some might be shielded, which would be nice for ignition wiring.
Keep 'em away from engine heat. Our equipment uses Amphenol connectors almost exclusively for sensors and any of them near the UV housings (about 130f) crack and split in under 3 months.

-Deek
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Keep 'em away from engine heat. Our equipment uses Amphenol connectors almost exclusively for sensors and any of them near the UV housings (about 130f) crack and split in under 3 months.

-Deek
These are outdoor rated. UL tested.
I also have some MIL spec type that are bayonet style connection that are much more robust. I agree, they should be routed away from heat and UV as a general rule of design.




I'm thinking I could either do all the connections under the seat, leaving the rectifier exposed to road draft for cooling.
The CDI's I have are in good shape, and one set that has the classic melted dielectric. I will test them, and if they're good I will re-pot them with some polyurethane. (at $80ish a set, it would be nice to have spares.)







Thanks so much guys.
This forum kicks so much more ass than the others... Very helpful.
 

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cb900f forks are 39mm. Should be a direct bolt on if you get the trees and they use your existing twin pot calipers (which are pretty good by old bike standards). You want the 81-82 sloted rotors (not the kind of slot you are thinking of it is a series of rectangles around the inner circumference of the rotor) since they resist warping better (DOHC rotors are known to warp). You will still need the caliper mounting brackets for the 750F/900F non leading axle forks though.

CBR hurricane (1000 not the 600) forks should be 40mm but I don't remember off hand. Still a conventional fork and I think you can use the cbr trees in your neck as well. The axle size is different so you will need to rebearing your wheel if you need to keep the stock wheel - otherwise it's a pretty straigh upgrade to a cbr f2 front wheel. CBRs use different calipers and rotors (lots of interchange with the interceptors of the same era) so you will need more brakes.

most cb750/900/1000 crusiers and standards of the DOHC era use 35mm or 37mm forks. There are some variants of the cb900F that use 37mm forks as well but I forget which countries. The early interceptors up to 86 used 37mm as well. Let's be honest here - 35mm and even 37mm in some ways are just too small for these bikes which easily push over the 500lbs mark and are top heavy to boot. They really should be at least 39mm for any kind of performance riding, and honda agreed and put them on the cb900f and 1100F.

Personally I find that the best rear shock length for these bikes is in the 13.75"-14.00" range. That's almost an inch higher over stock. However your Girlfriend may be dangling her feet at every stop. That is also with an 18" wheel.

If it were my bike, I would say fuck this old crap and do the cbr F2 wheel conversion. This nets you 17" diameters wheels with access to modern low profile tires, which will almost ofset jacking the rear up in back with a 13.75" shock. Hopefully that plus the low seat will allow her to touch the ground on these bikes. The rear is pretty much a bolt on, you have to play mix and match with the spacers from the cb and cbr but the axle size is the same for both bikes. The front is trickier because you may need to fab a caliper bracket for the forks to use the cbr f2 brake calipers.


I'm sure it has been mentioned before but, you do know a 500+lbs motorcycle is a terrible idea for a beginner, right?
 

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I personally prefer GM weatherpack connectors. UV resistant, heat resistant, idiot resistant (they only go one way and dont mess things up when you try to force it the wrong way), easy to work with, waterproof, and black.

If you run out of stock cdi units I have had good luck with these guys: Products - IgniTech P?elou? Have installed a couple of these units with great luck. Even with shipping, the price is VERY attractive for programmable ignition. And the girl answering the phone a couple of years ago had a great accent! I have used the TCIP4. If you get to building up the 900 engine with CR carbs and such, you might want the flexibility of changing the ignition curve. Plus fuel isnt what it used to be.
 
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yeah you are a fool to put a beginner 'specially a girl on that big bike,fek me agness !
get her a 125 -200 single jap dualsport and put her out in a gravel pit dirt roads learn her to skid around, then braking, sliding the front etc...... then let her ride that small bike on the road fer a season...yeah she will have a tough time keeping up with you,but it is not about you...
what are you thinking ?? fuk........ get her some good gear too,all over the whole kit
rant over, carry on, i like the bike
 

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Discussion Starter #38
The forks in this bike are 37mm OD, for what that's worth.

I'm sure it has been mentioned before but, you do know a 500+lbs motorcycle is a terrible idea for a beginner, right?
Yeah, I know.
I'm considering another bike for her that will have resell value, something like a Suzuki TU250. (I actually rode one of these and enjoyed it.)

She's currently putting around with my GS bike. (no lightweight.)
Also, she can flat foot many bikes. Long legs. I think she's about 5'10" or so. So maybe the suspension suggestions will work out perfectly.

Again, thanks for the knowledge of parts.
I'm going to refer back to many posts here when ready to upgrade these parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Well, I think I did the right thing tonight.

Went out and got a 250 for Jenny.
It's a super clean 2005 model and should do nicely till she's ready for something different... if she even wants something different.

It was affordable, and actually quite fun to whip around on.

 

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Good choice. Those EX250's are good about holding their value. You will probably be able to sell it for about what you paid for it in a year or two if, or when, she decides she wants something else.
 
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