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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys and gals.

Names Edward and I just purchased a 2015 SR400. This is actually my very first motorcycle ever. I have been working on cars since I was 8 with my grandfather, to the point where we fully restored a 64.5 Mustang. Im currently just cruising around town, getting used to the bike before any real modifications. Been lurking on this site for a few months and decided it was time to join.

Have mechanical experience with cars, but very little with bikes. Almost no fab skills whatsoever. Thanks for looking. Only good pic of bike so far. Snapchat-2696786897349135892.jpg
 

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Welcome. I like those new SR400s, I which they sold more of them.

So Briefly here is my opinion of what is different about motorcycles from cars:

Mechanical: Most stuff is pretty much the same. If you have worked on disc brakes on a car the same skills are applicable to bikes, except you can see the whole system and it is not assisted. However, unlike cars interchangeability is a bit more difficult since there are not generally industry standards outside of basic stuff like tires. you can't swap wheels like you can on a car for example, every bike has their own axle size and spacing. Modifying is also more interesting since things that apply to cars don't apply to motorcycles due to the dynamic of how motorcycles operate. For example lowering a car usually improves the handling in some way (provided your suspension geometry is good), but on bikes lowering a bike often does not improve handling. When approaching modifying the bike it pays to leverage the existing knowledge base for the bike as well as taking a install, test, revise approach. People that just blow motorcycles apart thinking they are going to ground up customize a bike having never done it before usually fail (not that you would do it with a new bike).

Riding: There are a special set of skills as a new rider you need to develop. These include reading the road, being constantly situationally aware, riding defensively, committing to your decision making, etc... These are skills that don't often get a work out in a car, at least not to the level they do on a bike. Everything you do right now should be helping your skills development. this means no low bars with an uncomfortable riding position that encourages you to not check your mirrors and things like that. Doesn't mean your bike can't get better, just means don't start sacrificing your enjoyment of riding in furtherance of your need to look cool. Focus on the short comings and try to make them better. How do I get better brakes, better suspension, better visibility? these are the questions you should be asking right now. How do I get that sweet deus look should be the furthest thing from your mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the input guys! Yes I will be keeping all stock for the time being. The idea behind purchasing this bike in particular was something more rider-oriented then mechanically oriented. If that makes any sense. Plus, my grandfather apparently had one in the early 80s, which he might have loved more than my grandmother at that point in time, but who am I to judge right. Thanks for the input. I am actually getting some pretty decent seat time. A couple hours at least every day, just to practice and learn my bike.
 

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I like it. That's a smart lookin ride right there. Good size, looks comfortable, big enough to pull you along quite well I would imagine. Enjoy, stay safe.
 

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That's the best choice I know of for a first bike. Kick start only really forces you to understand at least a little bit about how the thing works. Not to mention in my opinion those are the prettiest bikes yamaha sells new at the moment.
It's not quite as tall as the sr500 I've ridden, but I actually think that is a good thing for someone new to the hobby.
If you maintain that bike and don't run it as its limit everywhere you go, it will carry you for many, many years.
It can probably handle a lot of hard running, but maxxed out on the freeway for several hundred miles will likely wear it out prematurely.
I'd love to have one, though, even after 15 years of riding, the little bikes are still great, relaxing fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hey Guys so I have been riding the bike around for about a week or so, and have noticed that the bike sits a little too high for my comfort. After countless hours of searching online and the owners manuals, I have not found a way to lower it just a tad bit. Im not looking to alter suspension by any means, just trying to adjust it a little to have it perfect. Are there any suggestions that you would recommend?
 

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Hey Guys so I have been riding the bike around for about a week or so, and have noticed that the bike sits a little too high for my comfort. After countless hours of searching online and the owners manuals, I have not found a way to lower it just a tad bit. Im not looking to alter suspension by any means, just trying to adjust it a little to have it perfect. Are there any suggestions that you would recommend?
Are you talking about the seat height or how much your sitting up on it. The height is just over 30 inches right?
 

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Suit yourself but Geeto and Tanshanomi gave you the best suggestion, lower the saddle instead of the suspension. That's the only change you can make without adversely altering the bikes handling. New riders get way too hung up on needing to flatfoot both feet when they are stopped, the fact is if you are doing it right the bike remains balanced at all times and at most you should need to touch down one toe when you are stopped.

Meet world champion Motocross and Dakar Rally racer Gaston Rahier:

 

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Hey guys thanks for the input. I guess I'm just going to get used to this height. If both my feet don't NEED to be on the ground then I guess I'm doing this somewhat right. I might buy a seat later on after I get more experience and decide if I really want to change the look of the bike.
 

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yeah get more miles on it first. Tanshanomi stated it well, keeping feet on the ground is less important than you think at first. Yeah on parking lots you might need to reach a bit but its normal.
 

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I feel like a bike is too short for me if I can flat foot it. My daily rider fits this category, but I've gotten used to it.
If you're doing it right, your feet will be on the pegs most ofthe time anyway.
 

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Even at a standstill you should only have 1 foot on the floor. Your other foot should be on the back brake in case the person behind doesn't bother stopping
 

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If you really like the feeling of sitting on the bike and being flat footed, look for a bike that meets your needs. You can modify your riding fight, but to do it right isn’t cheap. Remember cutting corners or cheaping out can kill you on a bike.
Stay safe and alive!

 

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The only times I have ever been annoyed at not being able to flatfoot a bike are when I am backing it up. It can be a bitch to back into and out of the garage or my gate in Brooklyn if you have to rock back and forth. Even that is not a big deal and on the road, even driving up to a stop sign every block, it isn't an issue at all.
 
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