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Discussion Starter #1
Somebody should snatch these up.[uhttp://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/2006-r6-rearsets_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQcategoryZ35592QQihZ018QQitemZ280102068186QQrdZ1rl][/url] Item number: 280102068186
 

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sure they are cheap but how are you going to use them?

I mean the 2002 r6 rearsets have the shift pivot on the bracket so you can attach the bracket to the bike, the 06-07 R1 has the pivot on the frame of the bike so you have to do extra work to use that shift lever.

ideally for retrofit you want rearsets where both the control pedal pivots are on the peg mount (like the brake side in this auction) or where the pivots are on the backing plate.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Now your just nit picking Geeto,for that price it would be worth using the brake side as-is and flipping your factory shift lever GP style.
 

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I don't think I am a lot more goes into the mounting of these than you think, and that bracket on the left is too long to just flip around the shifter unless you are welding mounts to the frame (and I have a size 14 shoe).

besides these are cheaper and really what you want because you can always throw away the brackets and just use the peg bolts/levers thhough any hole in the bike (like the passenger peg mounts):

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Used-04-05-06-Yamaha-R1-Stock-Rearsets-Low-Reserve_W0QQitemZ140105971307QQihZ004QQcategoryZ35588QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
 

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guys-

i ran R-6 rearsets on the CB350 for two seasons. there is some work and the brackets are really long. and this was a set with the shift lever mounted to the bracket.

with the one's i found, if you want to keep the shift linkage and not go with a reverse shift pattern, you have to knock the peened heim joint off the top of the foot lever and flip it to the other side, so the linkage can clear the frame, the bracket and the maybe the clutch cover. then you have to find or adapt (i welded a short rod of Al) linkage long enough to make it from where ever you mount the brackets to the gear spindle. and if you do use GP shifting, you'll have to get a crazy long shifter unless you mount the brackets closer than i did (on the back side of the downtube)

the brake side was pretty straight forward.

thing is, the pegs were so far back with the long brackets that my feet were way too far up and back so i really couldn't put enough weight on the pegs to get my ass off the seat without the oddly far rearset and high pegs putting most of my weight way too far forward.

i have cbr brackets now and have gone to reverse pattern shifts. the repositioning of the pegs made a huge difference to me.

-tt



Edited by - ttilghman on Apr 11 2007 5:00:19 PM
 

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quote:
Sorry Geeto, I just thought someone with some imagination could have had some cool rearsets.
it isn't a matter of imagination, someone with imagination and skill can do anything. Someone with just imagination can get themselves in a lot of trouble.

I'm not trying to deter you from posting stuff like this, just talking about it like it is a no big deal installation when you probably haven't tried it.

I run 2002 R6 rearsets on my H1. I test fit 30 pairs of rearsets on it before I settled on the 02 rearset and I knew I would have to fabricate something to get them to attach (the welder fucked that up but that is a different story).

A lot of the people on the forum are talented fabircators, but a lot are also backyard people with no access to a welder or metal working tools. For those people rearsets that use the pegs as the lever pivots work because they are much easier to install (if you use the passenger peg mount) and require very little fab. greg at ohio cafe racers has a neat way of attaching sportbike brackets to older frames (using tubing clamps) and that also works.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Wow. I just wish I would have got this good of a response when I asked that question about cv VS. sl carbs for a cl350 motor, instead of the guy that told me to put them on and see for myself even though the motor was sitting on my bench.
 

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Had I had expirence with cb350s I would have given you that response. This is a diverse board, and with no specific motorcycle being the focus you are not always going to get the best answer (although cb350s seem to be owned by most).

However when it comes to custom stuff there are a lot of guys doing neat things since it is the nature of the bike. I have an h1 Tim has a 350 but we both had expirence with r6 rearsets, sometimes it is just going to work like that.

To answer your carb question as best I can, personally for high performance bikes I tend to avoid CV carbs, even though they are self compensating, because of the throttle lag and I am not keen on the rubber diaphrams. However most classes require 350s to run CV carbs so there may be some good racer tricks for the CVs (despite the fact all I hear is guys bitching about them). If you are carb savvy and know how to tune one go with a slide carb, if a carb confuses you a CV is kind of a set it and forget it deal.
 

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g man
i'm with you on the slide carbs being the way to go...one has to be sensitive with the ability of the engine to receive throttle input. never liked the idea of a diaphram deciding how much juice the intake hole can receive and am glad cv carbs aren't part of the gp classes. i'd imagine a clever dog could figure a way around the cv deal and still not break the rules.
parks
 

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Haha... that was me I think. My apologies if that wasn't the answer you were looking for - seems like the folks above have adequately addressed the CV vs slide issue. Personally I'd take just about anything over the stock 350 carbs just because the rubber diaphragms have become functionally unobtainable (as far as I'm concerned, $60 for a nickel's worth of rubber is unobtainable).

Try to see my last post as encouragement - no, I haven't tried it myself, and yeah, I'd love to know if it works because it may present an easy solution to a common problem.

A
 

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Something to think about on the carb front: Action Fours used reworked cb350 pistons to make 811cc kits for cb750s. The 1969 -70 cb750 carbs are individual cable pull, so you could theoretically disassemble a bank of them and they could support the 350. Also H1 500 kawasakis used Mukuni VM carbs (in either 26 or 28mm, I can't remember) and the late models are a cheap source for really awsome carbs.
 

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Hey...take all those ebay rear sets and jam them up your butts.

Hehe...just thought I'd make a random hostile post.

JohnnyB
 

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IAM CORNHOLIO
I need rearsets for my bunghole.
i wanted to post something too


77 bmw R75/7
74 Suzuki T-500 with clubmans and little turn signals
 

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Hey FATGUY
the SL carbs don't flow enough for a track bike which is why nobody here uses them. It's the upgrade carb for a CB175. The SL cam has little bitty lobes so those carbs may not work well on a street bike with the CB cam.
Report in if you try it out
bfd
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks bfd, thats what I wanted to know. I'm about a month or two from running the bike so I'll let you know how they do then. I got the sl carbs cheep so if they dont work out its no big deal, I just wondered if it was even worth using them.
 
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