Cafe Racer Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been racking my brain for the past 2 days trying to figure out how to wire an aftermarket Emgo right hand switch to replace the OEM unit ('82 CB650SC), any advice would be greatly appreciated. What I've come up with is:

OEM Wire to New Switch Wire:
Start Button - Blue/White to Blue - switched hot to dimmer
Start Button - Black/Red to Black - fused hot to start button
Start Button - Black to Red - switched hot to start button???
Start Button - Yellow/Red to Black/Red - start circuit to starter relay
Engine Stop - Black to White - switched hot to kill switch???
Engine Stop - Black/White to Black/White - ignition hot to coils
On-Off Switch - n/a to Yellow/Red - not needed?
On-Off Switch - n/a to Yellow - not needed?
On-Off Switch - n/a to Black/Yellow - not needed?

Plan to use the OEM connector.

46-68735-wiring-diagram-emgo-universal-multi-switch-handlebar-motorcycle-dual-sport-cafe-pin-out.jpg
hondaCB650SCwiring.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
First up, I don't think that switch is a good choice for your bike because it looks like it's designed for a CDI machine, whereas your CB650 is TCI. That said, it will work, but with some abnormalities.

From your harness to the switch, this is the colors you want:
Black/white -> White/black
Black -> White
Black/red -> Black
Blue/white -> Blue
Yellow/red -> Red
Black -> Black/red

You'll need to use the black wire in your harness for two connections on the switch, so plan accordingly. The yellow/red, yellow, and black/yellow on the switch will not be used as the on/off switch doesn't replace any stock functionality. You could use it for something later on, if desired.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
First up, I don't think that switch is a good choice for your bike because it looks like it's designed for a CDI machine, whereas your CB650 is TCI. That said, it will work, but with some abnormalities.

From your harness to the switch, this is the colors you want:
Black/white -> White/black
Black -> White
Black/red -> Black
Blue/white -> Blue
Yellow/red -> Red
Black -> Black/red

You'll need to use the black wire in your harness for two connections on the switch, so plan accordingly. The yellow/red, yellow, and black/yellow on the switch will not be used as the on/off switch doesn't replace any stock functionality. You could use it for something later on, if desired.
Thanks for that, its a big help. Can you recommend a switch, something with a smaller profile than stock, that might work. The few I looked at don't make mention of CDI vs TDI. Based on what I've learned earlier, the engine stop switch is open in the run position and closed in the off position. The oem uses a closed switch to power the coils and ignition modules and an open switch to kill the engine. So the stop switch will work in the X position. You cleared up the rest by sorting out the start button. I would still consider another switch if there a better option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
No specific recommendations, no. Just make sure it can handle at least 6 amps if you're using stock coils or at least 10A if you have 3 Ohm coils installed.

And yes, the switch you're currently using is closed in the off position, so for your bike off would be on and on would be off. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,774 Posts
Could you just hook the switch to a relay to power the coils directly from the battery (fused of course)?
I wonder why they don't just do this anyway? On my yamaha, I think switched power goes through 3 or four "connection points" before reaching the coils. Voltage drop across each connection can be significant on an old rusty system.
I wired in a switched fused lead through a relay to the coils and it's been trouble free for 3 years now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Could you just hook the switch to a relay to power the coils directly from the battery (fused of course)?
I wonder why they don't just do this anyway? On my yamaha, I think switched power goes through 3 or four "connection points" before reaching the coils. Voltage drop across each connection can be significant on an old rusty system.
I wired in a switched fused lead through a relay to the coils and it's been trouble free for 3 years now.
Would love to do this, I'm just not familiar enough with how the entire system works to execute. This is something I would like to learn so that I can simplify all the wiring.

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Definitely an option.

We sell subharnesses specifically for that application.

Ignition Coil or Headlight Subharness - Sparck Moto

Hit me up if you need one and want some help in getting it hooked up.
Totally intrigued by this, please dumb it down for me. So I wire one end to the battery, and the other to a start button? What about the kill switch? Is this eliminated, and I would rely one the key switch to stop the motor? I'm all for simplifying things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
You can eliminate if you want to, yeah.

Relays allow you to supply high current devices and use a low current switch. They're also useful in ensuring you can get full power directly from the battery to a component in need. With a lot of bikes, the flow of electricity might have to pass through several terminals and switches before arriving at its intended destination. This is particularly true of a lot of 80s bikes, where the electrics started getting more complicated. I recommend this subharness for the ignition coils on the Honda DOHCs as a matter of course.

Anyway... there are four connectors for the subharness. Power from battery, ground, power to component, and the trigger wire. The trigger wire is usually hooked up to a switch (kill switch, for instance, or ignition switch if you want power all the time when the bike is on) but can also be configured for ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,774 Posts
Totally intrigued by this, please dumb it down for me. So I wire one end to the battery, and the other to a start button? What about the kill switch? Is this eliminated, and I would rely one the key switch to stop the motor? I'm all for simplifying things.
Examples

http://gsarchive.bwringer.com/storagecliff/images/ignition_coil_ relay_part2.pdf

http://www.daytona-twintec.com/download/Ignition_Relay_Instructions.pdf

If you can't figure this out then you probably should have someone help you do it or do some more basic reading. Read about automotive relays and how they are wired.
Basically, your "low amp" kill switch on the emgo is used to control the relay to open and close a "higher amp" circuit from the battery directly to the coils. Remember to always put an inline fuse on any wire coming directly from the battery so that any accidental shorts will not cause a fire or worse.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top