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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm in the midst of building an Aermacchi that I've discussed here a bit and I have a couple S90ss that I'm slowly picking away at for myself, both of which have made me more interested in the flat/lay-down engine format.

Keep in mind that this is just musing/mental masturbation at this point but winter is coming up.......and I own a well sorted machine shop......

Engines used to be separate from the transmission and unitized via engine plates. I wonder what it would take to separate say a CB350 and rework it to orient as a laydown job. I can mill a trany case and convert to chain primary (350s are geared aren't they?) and engine plates would be pretty simple. Don't have a chassis in mind but that's not really the point right now...

I know I'd need to rework the oil pickup and probably do some baffling to keep oil out of the bore....maybe.....

Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
quote:Originally posted by UngaWunga

you have a lot of free time, don't you.
Not technically, I'm a chronic insomniac...
 

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I've been contemplating similar, although with a slightly simpler setup. I want to graft a CRF150R top end onto a bottom end that will fit where a Honda horizontal single like an S90 motor would go. I'd like to use a CR85 or similar transmission so I have something that'll handle the power, as well as having more than 4 gears.

I know the basics of designing the cases, as far as determining dimensions, but I have no skills or tools to pull it off.

My other thought has been a laydown conversion of a XR200 motor, which others have pulled off.

So I'd say what you're considering is 100% doable.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I haven't seen any conversions as of yet myself. I can build a Lifan 150 up to 202cc but it's still a 4spd and it'd still look like a pretty standard honda style laydown.....

A kart motor could be interesting but small, I still like the idea of a twin/multi cylinder.
 

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I'll see if I can track down the XR laydown conversions again, bunch of nutters in Austrailia make them, and shove them in ATC70s... crazy sand trikes are the result. : )
 

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Its an interesting exercise. I'd just be careful about what engine I chose to hack the gearbox off of. I think you'll have a hard time sealing the back of the engine, especially older engines where the case fit was a little... looser.

Might have to do some oil passage modifications to prevent oil from pooling in the head.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There is that.....
I could mill up a "deck" that could then be tig'd to a milled out engine case. Hmm.......
 

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Swagger,
Somebody made a 500 twin that had 2 Aermachi topends laid down on a new crank case. It was raced in the 60's, I think. The builder was Linto? or something like that. He was associated with Aermachi before that. I think milling the front out of a set of CB350 cases and moving the cylinders to mostly horizontal would work, but would worry about the length of the engine.

Ken
 

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Swagger,
Somebody made a 500 twin that had 2 Aermachi topends laid down on a new crank case. It was raced in the 60's, I think. The builder was Linto? or something like that. He was associated with Aermachi before that. I think milling the front out of a set of CB350 cases and moving the cylinders to mostly horizontal would work, but would worry about the length of the engine.

Ken
 

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Discussion Starter #15
AAAAEEEEIiiiiiiiii! A horizontal twim 'Macchi! Exactly what I was thinking of...that's fucking primo.

I do agree about engine length being a real issue with a unitized conversion, hence my interest in breaking one apart. I can tig up the engine cases to seal the sump, I've done a couple XR250 motors for a dude who makes ultra lite planes. He did all the internal rework though from what I understand there wasn't a lot that needed to be done though that may be a trait of the XR lump.
I'd quiz him about it but...he and my sister are no longer married and he dunna like me any longer. odd that...

My thought was that by de-unitizing the engine and trans, one could have a fair amount of freedom with layout. I could stack the trans above the crankshaft, much like just rotating the engine 90* but hopefully keeping the lubricants where they need to be. Plus.....fabricated stuff is just cool....
 

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Discussion Starter #16
AAAAEEEEIiiiiiiiii! A horizontal twim 'Macchi! Exactly what I was thinking of...that's fucking primo.

I do agree about engine length being a real issue with a unitized conversion, hence my interest in breaking one apart. I can tig up the engine cases to seal the sump, I've done a couple XR250 motors for a dude who makes ultra lite planes. He did all the internal rework though from what I understand there wasn't a lot that needed to be done though that may be a trait of the XR lump.
I'd quiz him about it but...he and my sister are no longer married and he dunna like me any longer. odd that...

My thought was that by de-unitizing the engine and trans, one could have a fair amount of freedom with layout. I could stack the trans above the crankshaft, much like just rotating the engine 90* but hopefully keeping the lubricants where they need to be. Plus.....fabricated stuff is just cool....
 

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http://www.vft.org/Sprint/LintoEngine.jpg
http://www.vft.org/Sprint/LintoEngineLeft.jpg
http://www.vft.org/Sprint/LintoEngineUnder.jpg
Classic Bike Magazine

August 1997 "Siamese Twin" Patrick Godet's restoration of a 1969 Linto

Lino Tonti, a veteran of Aermacchi, Bianchi and Gilera, designed a race bike called the "Linto" just before he was
hired at Moto Guzzi. The engine in the Linto was essentially two Aermacchi top ends grafted onto a single crankcase.

A Linto racing motorcycle placed second in the final World 500 GP standings in 1969
1) Giacomo Agostini (MV Agusta) 2) Gyulay Marzowszky (Linto) 3) Freddy Nash (Norton)

Dick Linton raced a Linto at the Classic Senior Isle of Man TT in the mid Eighties
and raced Aermacchis in the Junior class during the Seventies.
He is now a supplier of Aermacchi parts in England

I found all this a VFT.org/sprint

A cool site

Ken
 

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http://www.vft.org/Sprint/LintoEngine.jpg
http://www.vft.org/Sprint/LintoEngineLeft.jpg
http://www.vft.org/Sprint/LintoEngineUnder.jpg
Classic Bike Magazine

August 1997 "Siamese Twin" Patrick Godet's restoration of a 1969 Linto

Lino Tonti, a veteran of Aermacchi, Bianchi and Gilera, designed a race bike called the "Linto" just before he was
hired at Moto Guzzi. The engine in the Linto was essentially two Aermacchi top ends grafted onto a single crankcase.

A Linto racing motorcycle placed second in the final World 500 GP standings in 1969
1) Giacomo Agostini (MV Agusta) 2) Gyulay Marzowszky (Linto) 3) Freddy Nash (Norton)

Dick Linton raced a Linto at the Classic Senior Isle of Man TT in the mid Eighties
and raced Aermacchis in the Junior class during the Seventies.
He is now a supplier of Aermacchi parts in England

I found all this a VFT.org/sprint

A cool site

Ken
 

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Was wondering about that.
I bought most of the parts to make a V-twin out of Honda XL185 at one time (years before V-twins got popular)
Lost it all when I moved

PJ
 

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Was wondering about that.
I bought most of the parts to make a V-twin out of Honda XL185 at one time (years before V-twins got popular)
Lost it all when I moved

PJ
 
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