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Discussion Starter #1
I have a tank that I think is a Dick's Cycle West tank. I know the seat is and the seat matches up angle wise to the tank. So I kind of think they were made to be used together. The fairing is a read-titan if your wondering. Anyway the tank leaks. Looks to be leaking around the petcock. Also the tank has some pretty decent bubbles that have cracked open on the surface. If its that bad on the surface I'm a little concerned on the inside.

I'd like to think that its repairable. I've used fiberglass a bit in the past for other non-structural things but not sure how or if I can tackle this one on my own. Any suggestions? I was thinking of splitting the tank at the bottom seam to get a better look. Sound like a good idea or should I leave this up to some sort of expert?

I don't have a real good close up pic of the tank but this should give you an idea of what I'm working with.


 

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well a few bubbles don't always mean anything. is the tank structuraly sound? No cracking, flexing, or holes? if it's all good and there are none of those, than I would just use bondo-glass, fill the problems and paint it. if not than you could try to slosh some resin around the inside of the tank and coat it similar to a tank sealer. but if the bubbles don't go through than you shouldn't have any problems.. put some photos of the problems on the post. but glass is really easy if you just take your time. If you want your tank to look good though you'll need to sand it with a block. the fiberglass will be wavy even new.

carpe diem.... seize the carp
 

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repair the outside and use a good coating such as por 15 inside the tank to be sure you dont have leaks would be my advice, however i dont now all that much about fiberglass tanks

fat people are harder to kidnap
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It seems to be pretty decent structurally. No soft spots or big cracks.

So no one thinks I should risk cracking it open to get a good look inside?

I'll get some pics.
 

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what do you need to see inside for? If there are any other problem areas, a good liner or sealant should take care of them, if there are any good areas you would have ruined them by opening the thing up.

Personally I think you would get more out of pressure testing the tank than you would but just cracking it open because you are curious.

Where's monkey and bret? They are our resident fiberglass gurus one of them should have chimed in.
 

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yeah I'm not fiber glass expert... have you filled it with anything to see if it holds? I mean I usually use water in my metal tanks to check the welds? like I said if its not soft and there are no holes all the way through your prolly good to go

carpe diem.... seize the carp
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok I actually dug into it last night and the results were pretty good. The fiberglass is in fine shape. I don't think that there are any holes or cracks that actually would allow anything to leak. I removed the petcock and the gasket was in bad shape and somewhere along the line someone tried to seal it up with some sort of goo.

The problem was in the gelcoat. It was separating from the glass below it. I got out my small ball peen and started tapping on all the bubbled up areas. That broke up the bubbled gelcoat and then I used a screwdriver to pry any other loose bits off. I spent the better part of an hour removing all the cancer. The glass under the gelcoat seemed to be in great shape. It wasn't soft or breaking up at all. I had feared that the inside might be bubbling the same as the outside but now I a pretty sure it not. After I removed some chunks of gelcoat I could shine light into the tank through the fiberglass. Looks good inside but there is a fair amount of crud from old gas. I still plan to line the tank as its cheap insurance plus newer gas blends have a tendency to eat away the resins so I'm told?? On metal tanks I have lined one of the steps is an acid flush. I assume I don't want to do that since I don't need to get rid of any rust. What should I be using with fiberglass to flush it out that won't harm the inside? Is there a liner that might be better suited to the fiberglass tank?

The gelcoat that I chipped away I plan to patch up with bondo unless anyone has a better suggestion on what to use.

Oh and I did find a Dick's Cycle West Racer 1 label hidden under a piece of primed over tape.

I mocked up the whole setup last night and its kinda neat how everything lines up even though the Read-Titan fairing isn't a Dick's product. The mount for the tank is also the mount for the rear of the fairing. Everything just fits together like a glove.

Kevin





Edited by - hahnda on Dec 11 2007 09:36:53 AM
 

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I would use one of the newer epoxy resin liner kits, not the POR kit. I think the one by Caswell plating, but I've never used it.


Dunno about prep - maybe Caswell will have advice for a 'glass tank?
 

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I would use one of the newer epoxy resin liner kits, not the POR kit. I think the one by Caswell plating, but I've never used it.


Dunno about prep - maybe Caswell will have advice for a 'glass tank?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I think the Caswell kit will be the thing to use. They say prep the tank with acetone.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I think the Caswell kit will be the thing to use. They say prep the tank with acetone.
 

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dudes

do not pressure test the fiberglass tank.. you will end up possibly cracking it apart.

i usually glue my tanks together with an epoxy adhesive and seal the insides with an epoxy resin. A good suggestion would be to swish acetone on the inside around to remove any residue left behind by gasoline before sealing it.

the problem with most fiberglass tanks is that they are constructed with polyester resin and fiberglass mat. A person with talent can do a pretty nice job building one with these materials.... the problem is that gasoline does eat away at this polyester resin and eventually soaks throught the glass matrix.... you end up with a leaky fiberglass sponge . kinda sucks... Most people who build tanks like this used a polyester gelcoat to line the insides to combat the gas from eating it away.

Epoxy resin (WEST SYSTEM 105/206, MAS EPOXY....) there are several to choose from, holds up to gas very well. My personal tanks are constructed with west system epoxy... i usually drain the tanks after a race weekend anyway.

Matt

latered
 

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dudes

do not pressure test the fiberglass tank.. you will end up possibly cracking it apart.

i usually glue my tanks together with an epoxy adhesive and seal the insides with an epoxy resin. A good suggestion would be to swish acetone on the inside around to remove any residue left behind by gasoline before sealing it.

the problem with most fiberglass tanks is that they are constructed with polyester resin and fiberglass mat. A person with talent can do a pretty nice job building one with these materials.... the problem is that gasoline does eat away at this polyester resin and eventually soaks throught the glass matrix.... you end up with a leaky fiberglass sponge . kinda sucks... Most people who build tanks like this used a polyester gelcoat to line the insides to combat the gas from eating it away.

Epoxy resin (WEST SYSTEM 105/206, MAS EPOXY....) there are several to choose from, holds up to gas very well. My personal tanks are constructed with west system epoxy... i usually drain the tanks after a race weekend anyway.

Matt

latered
 

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matt...even pressure testing to like 2 psi is dangerous?

I used to test all the glass tanks I bought with 2-5psi in the bath tub. You don't need a lot of pressure - 1 psi is enough to force bubbles when the tank is submerged. I always figured the gasoline expansion on a hot day had more pressure than that.
 

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matt...even pressure testing to like 2 psi is dangerous?

I used to test all the glass tanks I bought with 2-5psi in the bath tub. You don't need a lot of pressure - 1 psi is enough to force bubbles when the tank is submerged. I always figured the gasoline expansion on a hot day had more pressure than that.
 

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You could test it with just plain old water... let it sit and things will leak if there is one. if you pressireize it too much you could cause it to expand and possibly crack.... if you didn't know what you are doing...

latered
 
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