Cafe Racer Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,355 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
On a 2001 Ford Ranger 3.0L V6, In its infinite wisdom ford decided to pump hot water through the intake. I am assuming its to help emmisions, faster warm ups and even to prevent throttle body icing in colder climates is also a reason. I immediatly bypassed that as soon as a I realized I had on my hands, but could I run cold water through there and make a sort of Naturally aspirated water/air intercooler, or at least a mildly less warm intake. i've got access to free oil coolers etc. the pump is the hardest part. But i am sure i could find a fuel pump cheap that could handle continuous duty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
Auto manufacturers have been running coolant through the intake manifold for years, if not decades.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,670 Posts
I'm just talking because I don't know anything specific about Rangers, but where's your coolant temp sensor? You don't want to trick the computer into thinking you're always in a cold-start situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,355 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
the coolant temperature sensor isn't in the intake. i have already disabled the heater circuit that runs through the plenum. the coolant temperature sensor is closer to the thermostat in some bunch of fittings further down. i'd explain it more clearly but i don't have a quality mental image and the truck isn't handy for me to check right now.

fateddy are you trying to direct me out of here?
i believe i've posted enough helpful suggestions to not be run off. plus i've posted this question in a 3.0l v6 specific forum but they were too conserned with cold air intakes and lift kits to actually care about air intake density. or any of the finer points of engine performance.

somewhat off topic of my own thread anyone put an aluminum plate between the back of the cylinders and the carb to act as a heat barrier between the carbs and engine. i believe i've seen it done on some race bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Didn't realize you were after racing info, wasn't trying to run you off.
I drive a Ranger and have used those forums for troubleshooting, usually with reliable results. All the other stuff on there just doesn't hold my attention. A lot of those "performance" threads on there just smack of 16 years old with My First Truck and a bunch of bolt-on stuff from Jegs. And the damn lift kits...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
You should just score a 351 at the boneyard and throw it in there... It can be done pretty inexpensively. I did it with a 460/C6 in a '90 Ranger. It was a GIANT pain in the ass, but well worth it. There were no fenderwells left and the firewall/trans tunnel was completely re-done, but the swap was very rewarding. You will more than likely not even need to upgrade the rear axle. I'm sure I'll get some flak for that statement, but the fact is (in my experience, anyway) that with that heavy an engine up front, the rear tires will go up in smoke long before the axles are stressed to the breaking point. Mine never even twisted (checked 'em every year).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,355 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
i know you weren't trying to run me off. i was joking.

i'd like to keep the engine thats in it, i want to try some rallycross, or just any sort of offroad racing with it. i'd like to keep it in the prepared class and out of the modified. (scca) its got the 3.0l v6 which is known for reliability but not a badass performance engine. but its what i got. i'd like to know how much affect on air intake temp and density that bit of plenum has. i imagine if its engineered to heat the air, it really ought to cool it just as well right? my main concern is will this warp or crack the aluminum plenum having a neat variance. it wouldn't be a shock to any sort of system as they would warm up together.

i use those forums whenever i need some info on tornados, or making my engine suck in colder air. i also like to add weight to things, especially if it partially blocks the radiator, or makes my tailgate rattle every 4th note.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I doubt you'll get anything flowing in there cold enough to crack or warp anything. You should be fine there.
If I recall correctly, horsepower increases 1% for every 10 degrees you lower the incoming air charge temperature. While it may get you SOMETHING, it might not be much. But hell, every little bit counts.
I learned this adage from an S/FX driver who raced in the early- to mid-60s: "Don't look for one place to shave 100 pounds. Look for 100 places to shave 1 pound". If you throw numerous, well-thought-out, and (mostly) inexpensive tweaks at your engine, you'll be ahead of the game and still have some loot left over for entrance fees!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,355 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
i read a backpacking book about ultralight camping, and it said "take care of the ounces and the pounds will take care of themselves." its been my philosophy on the xs so far. i am hitting every single little spot on my truck to bring out what potential is there. also i am on a budget, so until i can get some tom morana heads or whatever i'll be wringing out the stock plants every last little bit of go.

how do you lighten a ranger pickup? i've seens lots of fiberglass body panels available from the prerunner crowd, i'll have to see if they've got anything without wicked huge fenders.
battery relocation to under the seat... bed i mean pickup bed. and where do i start drilling lightening holes at?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Anything that looks too heavy! Hahaha! I took the door panels off of my Corvair autocrosser and went nuts with a hole saw on the inner door skins. I did re-install the door panels, though. Hood hinges, bumper brackets (not a GREAT idea for a street vehicle, but whatever), fender struts/braces, fender liners and inner wheelwells can get tossed altogether. You know those 'ribs' on the underside of the hood? Get to drillin'. The integrity of those ribs can be retained but something like 2 pounds of steel came out of the ribs under my Police Interceptor's hood. If you're gonna keep the wiper arms, drill any surface you can on 'em. Door handles? Who said THEY needed to be smooth and solid? Center caps on the wheels? Buh-bye. Or, if you really like them, drill them shits, too. The inside of the tailgate can be attacked with a hole saw, as well. Same goes for the front end of the bed. A bunch of nicely laid-out 4" holes will shed some decent weight and look good. That spare tire carrier under a Ranger is way heavy and unusable with any size tire much bigger than stock. It can prolly meet Mr. Dumpster.

You get the idea... If it's a surface big enough to put even a small hole in, drill it.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top