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A friend of mine recently purchased an 82 400t Hawk - which I'll be doing most of the work on while converting it to a 'sort of' cafe bike (more of a race/street bike look - the Hawk's aren't really much for cafe bikes). It was a good deal and is his first bike.

The P.O. swapped out the front end from an older model because the forks from the newer bike needed to be rebuilt.
The problem is - the new bike had comstars and a disc brake - that I want, while the older front end (currently installed) has a drum brake (that is not safe at all) and spokes.

SO My problem now, is that I need to completely rebuild the forks from the newer setup... And I have never done it.
I have the springs, lowers and uppers... possibly some more stuff but I just don't know what to look for.

P.S. I have an extra set of carbs (Honda CB400T) if someone wants to trade for some good forks with the disc brake mounts.... Also 2 extra side covers from a 400T Hawk.

P.S.S. The guy is throwing a CB450 in the trash on tuesday... I want it bad (to turn in to a street tracker like eurodave on dotheton.com http://dotheton.com/index.php?topic=469.msg3302#msg3302)... He said I could take it but I have no room. I'm gonna regret this.

Hey By'
 

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I haven't done those specific forks, but I've rebuilt several '70s and '80s damper rod type forks, and they're really not too hard. There's usually an allen head bolt recessed in the slider above the axle mount. The easiest way to remove them is with an impact wrench, being absolutly sure you have the correct size socket, and that the socket is fully engaged in the bolt, because if you strip that head, you're done. Also, you should have the fork in the triple clamp to loosen the top nut, otherwise you'll look like a monkey f***ing a football trying to loosen it.
The rest is easy.

FR
 

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Get some new seals. When it comes time to fit them, use a press and a makeshift drift the SAME diameter of the fork seal if you have access to them. Makes the job almost easy.

Otherwise, you've got to get the soft rubber fork seals down in the lower fork tube low enough to replace the snap ring in its groove without bashing the seal into a useless crumpled mess.

One trick I just learned about involves saving the old fork seals and using them as makeshift drifts to gently (but firmly) tap the new seals into place:

1. Pry out the old seals. The best way I found is to use a stout screwdriver and the rubber covered handle of a set of pliers--snap ring pliers work the best 'cause the handle is flat--as a fulcrum/protector laid across the top of the lower fork tube.

2. Slide the fork tube back into the lower fork.

3. Slide the new seal down the fork tube (right side up!).

4. Slide an old seal down the fork tube on top of the new seal.

5. Tap away. Patiently. So patiently.

Its not perfect, but it kinda works.

Bottom line: changing fork seals is a bitch without a press.

Honda go sideways!
 
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