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Doesn't seem that many years ago, that I turned down the chance to buy a very nice, very original, early drum brake 3 1/2 Sport for £1300..... Bugger.
I spent most of 2006-2011 surfing ebay.it and secondamano.it looking at Moto Guzzi Monzas and Imolas , Moto Moring 3 1/2s and Laverda 350s all in my price range. Did I come back with a bike? Nope.
 

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I spent most of 2006-2011 surfing ebay.it and secondamano.it looking at Moto Guzzi Monzas and Imolas , Moto Moring 3 1/2s and Laverda 350s all in my price range. Did I come back with a bike? Nope.
Buying Bikes and cars off of ebay is always sketchy anyway. But when you live in semi-rural areas like I do, the options are limited
 

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1962 Ducati Monza 250 Cafe' - Project

01414_jfJxQnJ85Lj_600x450.jpg

I have spent a lot of time and money on bringing the bike to its current condition. I no longer have the time or money, a child will do that.

The bike has most of the parts except-Steering stem, Headlight, Wiring, Tach, Speedo, Cam shaft bearings and as with any project there will be more.

I have a lot of pictures from the entire process, let me know if you want to see them and I will send you the link.

Recently a mechanic that restores older bikes reviewed everything and his opinion is below:

1) Positively ID year and model of frame and engine. Purchase shop manual and parts list for both - $100
2) Assemble frame and running gear.
A) Remove and re-install steering stem, front forks, swing arm and rear shocks to insure proper assembly -1.5 hours
B) Secure forward inner rear fender section, weld taillight bracket to rear frame loop--mask welded area and repaint black -1.0 hours
C) Steering stem knob is badly broken and there is no provision for steering stops. Will need to repair or replace or eliminate steering dampener knob and purchase or fabricate steering stops -.0.5 hours/parts: $45
D) Finish assembly of front end: confirm forks assembled correctly, add fork oil, install forks with external unshrouded springs, headlight brackets, clip on handlebars and steering stops. Drill and install front fender and install front wheel, first confirming that brake shoes are use-able. -2.5 hours / parts: $10
E) Headlight assembly looks Japanese? May need to have a custom speedometer cable fabricated. Sublet...$50
F) Install hand controls and square away control cables. There are a bunch of cables. Some may be -use-able, some may be needed, especially to accommodate very short handlebars-1.0 hour /parts $50
G) There are no electrical switches. We'll need a way to turn engine on and off, turn headlight/taillight on and off or at least switch high to low beam. Run a brake light and a horn if must be street legal. We will need to run a battery or at least a capacitor or change over to expensive electronic ignition. -1.5 hours / parts $100
H) Mount ignition coil, footrests, wheels, tank and seat. Fuel valves in box very rough, will need new ones or rebuilt -2.0 hours /parts $75
3) Assemble a use-able engine at minimum expense with the understanding that after a trial assembly and test run of 100 miles, it is very possible that the motor will need to come back out for a more thorough overhaul. This assumes leaving the bottom end together. Alternately you might choose to disassemble the bottom end for a crankshaft overhaul and to replace all the bearings seals and gaskets which would add something like $500-$750 to the project. If money were no object and the finest possible result were primary concerns this would be the way to go. My preference would be to get the entire motorcycle together and functional then de-bugging and overhauling as needed over time.
A) Cylinder is freshly re-bored. Assuming precision measurement confirms visual impression it can be used with the new piston, rings and circlips supplied. There is no new wrist pin but the old wrist pin
looks use-able.
B) Cylinder head not so good. The spark plug hole had been partially welded up. This is not the usual way to repair thread damage leaving me to wonder if there was a crack or what was the reason for
starting to weld the hole shut? At this point I would propose to bring it to a trusted clever machinist. I think the hole can be welded up totally, then re-drilled and threaded but it must be done precisely to
insure the spark plug seals and is correctly positioned within the combustion chamber. The valves and springs look nice and clean but I would want to remove them to insure that the valves, guides, seals and seats are all in good shape --Sublet $200
C) The cam shaft bearings are rusting and will need replaced right away. The lobes on the cam, one especially, show substantial wear as do the rockers, suggesting a lack of lubrication to the top end..
Still, the engine will run with these parts, though with a bit of ticking noise and power loss. There is little danger of anything breaking or causing further damage so I would propose to assemble the engine
with these parts. Once everything is together and it runs and all the hurtles have been overcome it will not be very difficult to replace the cam and rockers without removing the engine or the cylinder head --parts $50
D) The shift linkage sub assembly within the engine side cover works normally but should be opened for inspection, cleaning and lubrication. Ditto for the oil pump 2.0 hours
E) The internal transmission shifts OK on the bench. We won't know if it performs adequately on the road until we're together and running, unless we do a complete bottom end tear down first. Again, my inclination is to put everything together and evaluate what we have. If the engine has to come out for transmission work it's only 3 or 4 hours to take it out and put it back in, a small amount of time/expense to risk compared to the larger picture.
F) I lubricated the main bearings and the big end bearing. They feel smooth and no free play detected. Of course a complete crank overhaul and all new bearings seals and gaskets for the bottom end would be safest and a full on restoration would involve going all the way but I say let's make a complete motorcycle that runs then go from there.
G) Assemble and install engine 7.0 hours
H) Point to point wire entire machine -5.0 hours
I) Clean and install carb and plumbing for oil delivery to top end, fuel system and crankcase breather. Install exhaust muffler and try to use one of the unsightly header pipes provided (for now) 3.0 hours
J) Debug, tune, re-jet, test ride, tweak and evaluate results 3.0 hours
PARTS ESTIMATE................................................. $500
LABOR ESTIMATE..40 HOURS x $40/HOUR.... $1600
SUBLET LABOR.............................................. $250
HARDWARE, CHEMICALS, SHOP SUPPLIES... $75
ALLOWANCE FOR UNKNOWABLES............... $275
ESTIMATED TOTAL.........................................$2500-$3,000
This would yield a running, ride-able bike with a shop manual and parts book still in need of development such as fresh cam and rockers and extensive cosmetic detailing.
 

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Not that anyone asked, but regarding the Ducati:

I have no doubt the guy has spent a lot of money on that bike already, but some of the choices he made are... um... not what I would have done. Or more specifically not what I did. He spent a LOT on those rearsets, yet kept the stock Monza top triple with the bar mounts? Repro triples that are made for clip ons are available for not a lot of money. They'd look SO much nicer. As for the clip ons, they are mounted WAY too low. Sure you can slide them up but the current position makes me wonder if this guy ever even bothered sitting on the bike. Which brings me to the seat. Narrowcase Ducatis have really low frame rails. This seat is right down on the rails. Plus the rearsets raise the pegs. There is a reason you see a lot of Ducati singles with seats the look like they are mounted too high. It's not the seat being high, it's the frame rails being low (IMHO).

The battery tray has been deleted. With the low seat and no battery tray the only place for electrics is now the headlight shell or the tail section. I prefer a battery to run the lights but some go battery-less. There isn't much room under that tail section but maybe you could fit one in there. Remember the tire goes up in there and with no fender you'd need to protect it from everything the tire tosses up.

Steering stops for that bike are on the lower triple. Strange they'd both be broken off but not a huge deal to recover from. Except the triple is already painted..

The headlight/speedo looks horrible. Get a stock style headlight, the 130mm versions aren't expensive. Get stock headlight mounts and shorten them to allow using clips ins, or ditch the clip ons and use bars. Stock headlight shell will hold a stock ignition switch. Which is expensive...

I think the mechanic did a pretty decent job describing things but I wonder if his parts estimate is low. The price seems a bit high to me but on the flip side the owner has more than that into it and if you CAN finish it for another $3k you'd be into it for less than what a lot of guys have into the their 250s. So basically IMHO it's not a bad project but it's far enough along that a lot of (questionable) choices have been made for you, but still needs a lot of work so the final cost is unknown.
 

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I can honestly say I have never heard of a Hondamatic. Is it basically an over powered scooter? lol

'78 hondamatic CB 400
 

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I am weak for that Harris Matchless, just not weak enough to make a trek to NH with $4800 in hand. I did own a '67 "square" Ducati 250 Monza about 15 or so years ago. Paid $75.00 for it and a box of parts. I put one of the carbs together from the box, took the battery from my Honda SL100 and installed it, gave the thing a kick, nothing. Gave it another kick and brap, brap, brap. Sold if for$750. Would'a, should'a, wish'd I'd kept it.
 

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didn't get a good enough look at the inside of emergency rooms the first time around?
Only as dangerous as the skill level of the rider I suppose lol
 
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Oh, just keep hanging around and paying attention, you'll be on the inside before ya know it.
Like it or not.
Lol, ill do that.

This is not a for sell, that I know of. But I saw it and I just cant even... I see a lot of things that look like a mess to me. obviously its a show piece.

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what is with the forks that are to long? Mid controls and no mirrors? Plus everything is painted black with what looks like a suede seat? that bike would roast you in the summer time.
 
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