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What happens when you put your hand over the output, does it make a farting sound and push your hand away like the output on a central vacuum cleaner, or just make the little fan motor spin slower like a hand held hair dryer?
 

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So how many pounds of pressure is your waste gate set at?
... if it doesn't have one, then don't expect much of a boost and be prepared for some significant performance lag.
Back in the bad old days, my solution to turbo lag was a couple of ping pong ball valves similar to old skin diving snorkels.
These allowed air in when the turbo wasn't up to speed and used turbo pressure to close it providing boost.
This makes the engine n/a off the mark (no lag) and produced more exhaust to get on boost quicker. Later I used reed valves.
In this case n/a till the electric turbo is turned on via a full throttle micro switch, then is just depends if it produces any boost.
 

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The modern day solution to turbo lag is to put in two small turbochargers like my pickup truck has. Extra valves don't produce pressure, valves can only hold pressure back.

A tiny fan introduced into the intake path is not going to provide boost, if the blower can't move his hand when he holds his hand against the output, it's certainly not going to force air and fuel into the engine with significant pressure. Might better aim it to the rear of the motorcycle and hope the air currents push you forward like a jet.
 

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Suzuki GS 450, 1981
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
That sure don't look or sound like no 30,000 RPM
Have you ever used a router? They are lucky to run at 24,000 RPM and they scream at that speed. Check what your actual no load RPM's are now from 12 volts,
then figure on a whole bunch of inefficiency called slippage in your blowers ability to actually produce some air pressure.
OK, we'll see.. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Back in the bad old days, my solution to turbo lag was a couple of ping pong ball valves similar to old skin diving snorkels.
These allowed air in when the turbo wasn't up to speed and used turbo pressure to close it providing boost.
This makes the engine n/a off the mark (no lag) and produced more exhaust to get on boost quicker. Later I used reed valves.
In this case n/a till the electric turbo is turned on via a full throttle micro switch, then is just depends if it produces any boost.
OK, thanks for the suggestion with reed valves .. need to read more about them. Do you know if they are available as adjustable? I was going to use an electric selenoid valve but will take a closer look at reed valves first ..
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
The modern day solution to turbo lag is to put in two small turbochargers like my pickup truck has. Extra valves don't produce pressure, valves can only hold pressure back.

A tiny fan introduced into the intake path is not going to provide boost, if the blower can't move his hand when he holds his hand against the output, it's certainly not going to force air and fuel into the engine with significant pressure. Might better aim it to the rear of the motorcycle and hope the air currents push you forward like a jet.
We'll see.. :)
 

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So did you hold your hand over the output and see if it actually produces pressure yet or can you hold the air pump back? That's a pretty simple pressure test.

... you should read up on how much power superchargers take to run them. Those technologies were developed during wars. None of them ever put little electric fans into the intake path to boost performance successfully. I'm sure it was explored.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
So did you hold your hand over the output and see if it actually produces pressure yet or can you hold the air pump back? That's a pretty simple pressure test.

... you should read up on how much power superchargers take to run them. Those technologies were developed during wars. None of them ever put little electric fans into the intake path to boost performance successfully. I'm sure it was explored.
Can unfortunately not perform your "test" due to the electric supercharger is mounted on the motorcycle .. but I just say we will see what the dyno test says further ahead .. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
What did the dyno say before you modified it?
It will be dynotested with the same conditions .. tested without the supercharger mounted and then with supercharger mounted not running and at full throttle .. with the same adjusted AFR-values for each test.. not tested yet but soon!:)
 

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So this guy:


is using two 48V pre-production eBoosters to help spool up his rear mounted turbo on his RS4. Not apples to apples, but useful to see the hurdles he's going through to run them properly.
 
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
how much air can it flow and at what pressures? at 9,000 rpm it needs to flow 2,000 litres per minute to just feed the engine.

how do you link engine rpm to charger rpm?
Performance
Operating voltage: 12V-16V test value
Drive current: 26A measured value
Shutdown voltage: 0.8V throttle practical value
Full-speed voltage: 0.9V-2.2V use value
Linear drive: 0.9V-2.5V measured value
Speed range: 6800RPM-32000RPM
Wind speed range: 5m / s-86m / s measured value
Wind pressure range: 0.05kg / cm-0.2kg / cm with turbine test value
Adjustment mode: Throttle voltage signal is activated
Fan power: up to 240 watts
Rectangle Slope Font Parallel Pattern

Font Screenshot Number Pattern Parallel
 
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