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quote:Originally posted by JPellegrino

I like HD tour bikes even though I have never owned one. IMO they are perfect for the wide open roads here in the U.S. They also have a long history here and sound great doing 80/90 mph on an open stretch of road all day. Look, I like mostly European vintage bikes, but I can appreciate HD in the proper application.
Yeah, I don't know why Americans would even want to ride anything else other than a Harley (and maybe that's why they're still in business), but then again that would totally negate the validity of this forum wouldn't it! :D
 

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I wanted to hate on them until I borrowed an electra-glide and rode it up PCH to mir woods with the wife. I felt like a real dick using the radio, but otherwise the bike was great. Scared the wife half a dozen times when something found pavement and I was still running wide in the turn, but otherwise the bike was amazing. pure amazing. I am pretty sure given my current situation it would be a completely useless bike for me.
 

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I wanted to hate on them until I borrowed an electra-glide and rode it up PCH to mir woods with the wife. I felt like a real dick using the radio, but otherwise the bike was great. Scared the wife half a dozen times when something found pavement and I was still running wide in the turn, but otherwise the bike was amazing. pure amazing. I am pretty sure given my current situation it would be a completely useless bike for me.
 

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If you like short shifting at very low revs and strait line highway a harley touring bike is nice. Reminds me of a tractor engine. Don't bother reving it your wasting your time. Have really tried to like a harley rode a sportster, an fxrs and the last yr of the shovel head touring bike for around a 100 miles. If i could afford to just listen to it cranked up in the driveway and only look at it would own one. But when i ride one i want to go get a suite and start singing green acres is the life for me. I could get me a springed tractor shape seat to bounce around on to. Maybe there is some form of power now with 103 cu.
 

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If you like short shifting at very low revs and strait line highway a harley touring bike is nice. Reminds me of a tractor engine. Don't bother reving it your wasting your time. Have really tried to like a harley rode a sportster, an fxrs and the last yr of the shovel head touring bike for around a 100 miles. If i could afford to just listen to it cranked up in the driveway and only look at it would own one. But when i ride one i want to go get a suite and start singing green acres is the life for me. I could get me a springed tractor shape seat to bounce around on to. Maybe there is some form of power now with 103 cu.
 

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I remember a while back reading that that gear shift feel is by design. There are some year Harley's that shift better than others but part of the "experience" of riding a Harley is this feeling that you are operating a substantial and heavy machine. A shift like a new R1 would take away from that. I have to say, some of the old jap bikes feel the same way, you can't be pussy footed with a SOHC 750 unless you like the sound of gears crashing.


"by design" ? dog poop.

Big flywheels and sloppy tolerances make for ham-fisted shifting, as a CONSEQUENCE of design. It is SOOOO H-D to present a flaw as a desirable personality trait.
 

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I remember a while back reading that that gear shift feel is by design. There are some year Harley's that shift better than others but part of the "experience" of riding a Harley is this feeling that you are operating a substantial and heavy machine. A shift like a new R1 would take away from that. I have to say, some of the old jap bikes feel the same way, you can't be pussy footed with a SOHC 750 unless you like the sound of gears crashing.


"by design" ? dog poop.

Big flywheels and sloppy tolerances make for ham-fisted shifting, as a CONSEQUENCE of design. It is SOOOO H-D to present a flaw as a desirable personality trait.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Years and years ago I lived in Ohio for a (thankfully) brief period. I had my Interceptor with me. It was ill-suited to an area with arrow-straight roads and 90-degree crossing. By contrast, a big Harley or Wing was the idea machine. They certainly have a purpose. I'll admit the bigger cruiser have a fair amount of horsepower and torque which is useful when you have a lot of accessories and carry two people, but my Yamaha Venture could to the same thing with a smoother engine and less weight. Once you get above 10-15 mph all the big bike "feel" goes away because it handles and reacts like any motorcycle.

I had no idea about the Coca-Cola tattoos. I'm only brand loyal with a few things, Levi 501 jeans as an example, but Coke Classic is probably top of the list. Pepsi is too sweet and lacks that slightly bitter edge Coke provides. There is the World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta which I visited in the past. I wore my Coke t-shirt that I found in Berlin - it features the Coke name in Cyrillic lettering. The employees coveted it.

Back to the Harley work, I'll be the first to admit I want a replica of the Captain America chopper from Easy Rider. Maybe not all the chrome but it has the old school, vintage style that appeals to me. Long forks, stepped seat, minimal everything. The only change I would make is to add a front brake. The gingerbread Tuttle bikes blow monkeys.

As I mentioned previously, nearly every person I've met at the dealership, whether a co-worker or customer, has been very cool, very friendly, and very much fanatical about the v-twins. As a friend pointed out, when you buy the bike you buy the lifestyle, typically in the form of leathers and tattoos and bar-hopping, but the same can be said of other types of bike ownership, such as the folks over at DTT with their interest in vintage style jackets and half-shell helmets. I bet some of them even have Triumph tats.

But... going back to my original post, Harley bikes still seem a little primitive and vintage in their own way. The customers seem to love that aspect so obviously Harley is giving the public what they want. I'll stick with my rice-grinders.

It's a beautiful Friday in Denver and I have the day off so I'm heading up to the mountains on my VF Sabre. Cheers to all.
 

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Discussion Starter #69
Years and years ago I lived in Ohio for a (thankfully) brief period. I had my Interceptor with me. It was ill-suited to an area with arrow-straight roads and 90-degree crossing. By contrast, a big Harley or Wing was the idea machine. They certainly have a purpose. I'll admit the bigger cruiser have a fair amount of horsepower and torque which is useful when you have a lot of accessories and carry two people, but my Yamaha Venture could to the same thing with a smoother engine and less weight. Once you get above 10-15 mph all the big bike "feel" goes away because it handles and reacts like any motorcycle.

I had no idea about the Coca-Cola tattoos. I'm only brand loyal with a few things, Levi 501 jeans as an example, but Coke Classic is probably top of the list. Pepsi is too sweet and lacks that slightly bitter edge Coke provides. There is the World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta which I visited in the past. I wore my Coke t-shirt that I found in Berlin - it features the Coke name in Cyrillic lettering. The employees coveted it.

Back to the Harley work, I'll be the first to admit I want a replica of the Captain America chopper from Easy Rider. Maybe not all the chrome but it has the old school, vintage style that appeals to me. Long forks, stepped seat, minimal everything. The only change I would make is to add a front brake. The gingerbread Tuttle bikes blow monkeys.

As I mentioned previously, nearly every person I've met at the dealership, whether a co-worker or customer, has been very cool, very friendly, and very much fanatical about the v-twins. As a friend pointed out, when you buy the bike you buy the lifestyle, typically in the form of leathers and tattoos and bar-hopping, but the same can be said of other types of bike ownership, such as the folks over at DTT with their interest in vintage style jackets and half-shell helmets. I bet some of them even have Triumph tats.

But... going back to my original post, Harley bikes still seem a little primitive and vintage in their own way. The customers seem to love that aspect so obviously Harley is giving the public what they want. I'll stick with my rice-grinders.

It's a beautiful Friday in Denver and I have the day off so I'm heading up to the mountains on my VF Sabre. Cheers to all.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Acemon

As a friend pointed out, when you buy the bike you buy the lifestyle, typically in the form of leathers and tattoos and bar-hopping, but the same can be said of other types of bike ownership, such as the folks over at DTT with their interest in vintage style jackets and half-shell helmets. I bet some of them even have Triumph tats.
But do they know the difference between the new company and old original company Triumph logo's ?
ed
 

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quote:Originally posted by Acemon

As a friend pointed out, when you buy the bike you buy the lifestyle, typically in the form of leathers and tattoos and bar-hopping, but the same can be said of other types of bike ownership, such as the folks over at DTT with their interest in vintage style jackets and half-shell helmets. I bet some of them even have Triumph tats.
But do they know the difference between the new company and old original company Triumph logo's ?
ed
 

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coca-cola from Mexico is the only cola worthy of the name. It's made with SUGAR like god intended - corn is for whiskee!

I ride a primitive motorcycle and I understand luddite charm. And I understand "fraternity" (a.k.a. cohort identity). HD combines those things to give a lot of people a lot of pleasure and I do not begrudge any of them whatever joy they get from riding their tractors in a herd.
 

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coca-cola from Mexico is the only cola worthy of the name. It's made with SUGAR like god intended - corn is for whiskee!

I ride a primitive motorcycle and I understand luddite charm. And I understand "fraternity" (a.k.a. cohort identity). HD combines those things to give a lot of people a lot of pleasure and I do not begrudge any of them whatever joy they get from riding their tractors in a herd.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Acemon
built in the 30s, it's amazingly similar to the ones built today, especially so with the separate transmission.
um....actually the only thing amazingly similar is the bodywork and the general layout of the engine. Harley has chosen to stick with the 45 degree angle between the cylinders for a variety of reasons, some even relating to sound, but aside from the fact they they both look kinda simialr if you squint from 10 feet away, there is a lot different.

For starters modern bikes have oil pumps. A 30's harley has a syringe like plunger on the tank where every couple of miles you have to feed oil into the total loss system. Modern aircooled harleys have things like twin cams and fuel injection, and a lot of parts that they use to intentionally make them look like the bikes from the 30's to the 50's. How useful do you think that fork shroud is on the front of a fatboy? probably not at all but the bikes in the 50's had them.

But the thing that you think really makes them look like 30's bikes is the seperate engine and transmission? Hate to tell you this but before the japanese came over here, that's how all motorcycles were made. Triumph stopped doing it in the early 60's to try and save production costs, but norton went to their grave with a seperate engine and trans, Royal Enfiled gave it up in 2009, BMW and Guzzi still do it to this day (I think victory does too but not sure).

Honestly it is the preferred setup for owners because from a maintenance standpoint it is less expensive to fix if you have a catostrpohic failure. In a unitized setup, you blow your tranny the engine and trans has to come apart and get checked. So you are forced to do a bottom end rebuild of some magnitude. Plus the bike has to come completely apart. If you look at most 5-10 year old used bikes that are unit construction - a good deal of them are considered totalled if the trans is blown.

I will say this - HD's cartirdge style trans setup in the sportster really shows their thinking in trying to make a product that can be easily serviced and maintained. And they beat even triumph and the japanese with it in the early 1950's. Maybe it is because bikes back then required more service, or that they really wanted to make a lasting product, who knows. But they stuck with it to their benefit.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Acemon
built in the 30s, it's amazingly similar to the ones built today, especially so with the separate transmission.
um....actually the only thing amazingly similar is the bodywork and the general layout of the engine. Harley has chosen to stick with the 45 degree angle between the cylinders for a variety of reasons, some even relating to sound, but aside from the fact they they both look kinda simialr if you squint from 10 feet away, there is a lot different.

For starters modern bikes have oil pumps. A 30's harley has a syringe like plunger on the tank where every couple of miles you have to feed oil into the total loss system. Modern aircooled harleys have things like twin cams and fuel injection, and a lot of parts that they use to intentionally make them look like the bikes from the 30's to the 50's. How useful do you think that fork shroud is on the front of a fatboy? probably not at all but the bikes in the 50's had them.

But the thing that you think really makes them look like 30's bikes is the seperate engine and transmission? Hate to tell you this but before the japanese came over here, that's how all motorcycles were made. Triumph stopped doing it in the early 60's to try and save production costs, but norton went to their grave with a seperate engine and trans, Royal Enfiled gave it up in 2009, BMW and Guzzi still do it to this day (I think victory does too but not sure).

Honestly it is the preferred setup for owners because from a maintenance standpoint it is less expensive to fix if you have a catostrpohic failure. In a unitized setup, you blow your tranny the engine and trans has to come apart and get checked. So you are forced to do a bottom end rebuild of some magnitude. Plus the bike has to come completely apart. If you look at most 5-10 year old used bikes that are unit construction - a good deal of them are considered totalled if the trans is blown.

I will say this - HD's cartirdge style trans setup in the sportster really shows their thinking in trying to make a product that can be easily serviced and maintained. And they beat even triumph and the japanese with it in the early 1950's. Maybe it is because bikes back then required more service, or that they really wanted to make a lasting product, who knows. But they stuck with it to their benefit.
 

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Pie is and interesting number.
Personally I prefer what e will do when working with equations

BUT, hands down a nice sweet baked pie is better
 
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