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That white one looks sexy, just. But it's functionality, is in the shitter.

The next time someone says : "Nice Cafe", just give them directions on how to go to get the best coffee in town. And give a real vacant look. That will confuse people no end.

Danger, is my business."
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Personally, given that you are starting with a very rare bike, I kinda like the looks of this build:



A complete resto with flat bars?

Didn't know I picked up such a rarity! Hah, Just thought she was uncommon!
 

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Discussion Starter #25
That white one looks sexy, just. But it's functionality, is in the shitter.

The next time someone says : "Nice Cafe", just give them directions on how to go to get the best coffee in town. And give a real vacant look. That will confuse people no end.

Danger, is my business."
Ahahaha, great idea. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I would like to thank you all for your advice too and not ripping me a new one for being a noob :)
 

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Hello all. Just purchased my third bike today. Kinda scary purchase though... first bike I have purchased to become a cafe racer AND the first bike I have purchased without a title. 1966?? Yamaha YM1. It has a trail of bills of sales going back to 1981 from previous owner and his father (hasn't been registered since the 70s). It runs great, goes through the gears no problem and looks like nothing else I have ever had before. It is just... beautiful. 40xx original miles and all #s matching. VIN came back from police in WI as clear and checks out on NIBC Vin checker. You guys recommend the Vermont route (heard it is SUPER easy) or trying MNDOT?

ANY help is appreciated in getting this beauty back on the road!

Cheers,
G-Fox

View attachment 14907 View attachment 14908 View attachment 14909
Nice bike you have there... Welcome to the group!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Ok guys, been a while. Got into the bike... some good/bad news. Obviously I want to focus on reliability and SAFETY more than anything atm...

BAD NEWS:
-Forks are SEIZED up front. Not to worry though! New ones from a YDS5 on the way to swap out!
-OILING ISSUES!!! The oil pump seems to be kicking air into the line? There are lots of air bubbles in the line. Going to try bleeding it first to see if this does anything. If not, I need a rebuild kit from... somewhere :(
-Clutch slips over 4k. I have a spare motor so I pulled the clutch pack from there and it looks good! Going to resurface it and send it off to be worked up/sand blasted.
-GASKETS GASKETS GASKETS! I need them. Motor/petcock/oilpump, etc. If anyone has any links/stores that work on YM1s (specifically Yamaha 305s), or any part sources, I will take anything right now! I know there is a guy in europe that makes them, but he isn't responding to me. Not sure if he is on vacation now, but I want this bike going in the next month or two.
-Needs tires. What's new? They are 40+ years old. Dry rot is a heck of a thing.

GOOD NEWS:
-Title arrived!
-Tank is clean! No rust or anything.
-Carbs look great!
-There appears to be parts available. eBay has given me some hope to piece together some gasket kits for my bike. Just wish there was a one stop shop though!

Once again, thank you for all the kind words on here and all of the input. It means a lot to someone with their first old 2 stroke! :)
 

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Air bubbles in the oil injection lines sounds very familiar, I think my bikes always had air bubbles in the oil injection lines.
… just a thought that it might not signify a problem provided there is sufficient oil getting to the engine.

" Going to resurface it and send it off to be worked up/sand blasted." … sand blast a clutch ?:I
… k, just so you know; a clutch is made up of alternating steel plates and
fibre plates sandwiched together between spring loaded pressure plates. The fibre plates are constructed of cork or paper based material.

What are you going to have sand blasted and what material will that process be removing ?:I
 

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My first bike was a 67 YM1. My oil pump was cracked so it would lose its prime, fail to deliver and then the pistons would lightly seize. I would then drain some oil from the oil tank and premix the rest of the tank of gas. By that time the engine had cooled and the pistons would unstick and I would be able to ride off into the sunset. This is not a practice I recommend, but it never left me stranded. so, check your oil pump body for cracks. As far as the clutch goes, I would take the steel plates and check that they are not warped. If they are replace them, if they are not then sand them to remove any discoloration or hot spots. Some people say sand in one direction only on a sheet of glass, but I just use an electric palm sander with 120 grit on a flat surface. It has worked great for me even on race bikes. Next I clean the fiber plates with contact cleaner to remove the surface oil and lightly sand them too to remove any glazing. At that point I prefer to replace the springs, but if I can't find any then I shim the stock springs with a sparkplug washer.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Air bubbles in the oil injection lines sounds very familiar, I think my bikes always had air bubbles in the oil injection lines.
… just a thought that it might not signify a problem provided there is sufficient oil getting to the engine.

I am concerned about under oiling the motor on this beauty. I have a spare oil line, and I think someone posted a NOS gasket kit for it. Little worried about 50 year old rubber tho :x


" Going to resurface it and send it off to be worked up/sand blasted." … sand blast a clutch ?:I
… k, just so you know; a clutch is made up of alternating steel plates and
fibre plates sandwiched together between spring loaded pressure plates. The fibre plates are constructed of cork or paper based material.

What are you going to have sand blasted and what material will that process be removing ?:I
The clutch pack appears to be two steel plates on this bike, not cork/fibre. My friends who have restored old YM1/YDS bikes stated roughing up the material will create a better contact between them. As there is rust on both surfaces, it could be creating contact issues? I have never worked on old bikes to this depth before so I honestly wouldn't know what the best fix for a slipping clutch would be in this case.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
ThanK you kenessex. I still need to remove the clutch in the bike currently. The one I pulled from the old motor looks great, just needs a resurfacing and it will be good to go. The oil pump looked fine, maybe just a leaking diaphragm or gasket causing air bubbles to pump into the line?? I will try rebuilding it to see if it gets me anywhere. Thank you so much for the advice! Heard these bikes are a love hate relationship :p
 

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Your clutch has steel on steel plates, let me think if that would work …. nope, can't see it, that would slip like a bitch and have zero friction zone
:) I need pictures of this one for sure.

The plates with the teeth on the outside, are you sure they aren't labeled as "friction" plates if there is a parts manual anywhere :|
 

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Old thing I worry about is that it is NOS. :( 'new' 50 year old rubber I guess is better than 50 year old dry rubber.
No rubber in the kit.

I have used this exact gasket kit on about 10 yds/ym engines. No issues. I have ran into NOS gaskets that become brittle but these kits are not and work just fine.
 

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Forget sanding or blasting clutch plates or fibres. It's a stop gap or temporary measure. It works for a while, then it doesn't. It's a waste of time IMHO.

Get some new springs, fibre plates and steel plates. Barnett should be able to supply them, they make clutches for about everything.

Danger, is my business."
 

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If a temporary fix is what you really wanted and there was actually still some clutch material intact, you could soak the rubberized cork plates in gasoline until they swell up a bit, then they will grab for a short while, at least until the gas evaporates. Anything else is just removing more material which will get you nowhere in a hurry :|
 
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