Cafe Racer Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
There used to be a site Caferacer.com, but it is no longer active. They had a series of articles on building a Triton. Does anyone have a copy of these articles? I believe it was a shop that did the series.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
If you go to the Unity Equip website they can supply everything you need to bolt a Triton together. About all you would have to supply is the Triumph engine. The son of a friend was on there and found out that they can supply a complete rolling chassis less engine and trans for a little over 8000 Sterling!!!! For you and I thats a little over $16,000!! He works for a bank and didn't blink. I reckon his desk must be in the vault.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The article gave exact insturctions for fitting up the engine and some alternatives for the forks. Somebody must have a copy of it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
What is a Triton? Triumph engine, Norton frame. The hard part? Engine plates. Unity Equipe makes plates for all of the featherbed models. After that it is up to the builder as to how he wants to finish it up. That, I know is simplistic. But when you boil it down thats about what it amounts to. A Triton was a period machine that has thankfully survived the test of time.

Back then there wasn't as many parts available as there are today. Norton would not sell engines. You had to buy a complete machine. Formula three was a popular car class in the 50s and there were a lot of frame left over after the engines were taken for F3. Engineless Manx frames presented the ultimate handling chassis and all you needed was an engine. Lots of cheap and cheerful Triumph engines provided the answer.

Today building a Triton involves finding a 40+ year old frame and an almost equally old motor. Replicas for most parts are available bu at a price. My Norton/Weslake (I'm a big fan of singles) required engine plates that weren't made by anyone. So I made my own. 3/8" alloy plate and three nights of cutting with a crappy jigsaw. And I had to make a lot of other bits and pieces. But thats part of making a special. Geodav, if you have a Norton frame and a Triumph motor go onto Unity's website and start building. I don't necessarily mean to buy everthing but get ideas and see what you can make yourself. Thats the whole idea of a special. Somebody once wrote. "A special starts with a punch mark in a piece of alloy."
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top