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Well, after 3.5 years of being without a motorcycle...enough is enough. I've decided to get back into riding, and have been enamored with the cafe-styled vintage racers for quite a while before stumbling across this site. Thanks to everyone here for an informative community.

So, a little "history" about my riding up to this point. Rather than be all wordy, I'll just link some pics...for my own sentimental value if nothing else.

First bike: 1997 YZF600r


I had fun with some small visual mods before getting into the performance aspect of things...I like to tinker and didn't need to make the bike faster at the time. Eventually re-jetted the bike and added an Arrow full exhaust. Then my neighbor sold me this:

#2 - 2003 Yamaha R1



Perhaps I took things "too far" with this one. Velocity stacks, Akrapovic full Ti exhaust, professionally mapped Power Commander. It was a rail in the corners, much lighter than the YZF...and had gobs of power. I eventually wrecked mid-turn on the street, repaired the bike, then decided to get on the track and play properly. Sold the 600r that I had still been hanging on to, and picked up...

#3 2003 CBR 600rr:



First upgrades to the bike were brakes and a full suspension rebuild. I eventually got my CCS license and started spending my weekends on the track (Jennings GP was a second home to me). Eventually wanted to be on the street too...so...

#4 2007 Triumph Speed Triple



That's where the euro-styled naked fetish began...and never seemed to go away. On track days I started staring at the vintage bikes out on the track, then got into watching some of the classic AMA races that friends had stashed in their collections. Shortly after though, I moved cross-country to find a job and had to sell both the Speed Triple and the 600rr...which left me bikeless.

3.5 years later...here I am wanting to ride again, and decided that I'd build a quick little vintage bike to satisfy my guilty pleasure. I really want this next purchase to be something I hold onto for a LONG time. I threw out a wide net initially, but have narrowed things down a bit. I'm pretty much on the hunt for a GS550 or CB750 now...hoping to find a bike that's running strong with some cosmetic flaws that I can easily iron out. Don't worry though...I'm not going to build a blingy hipster starbucks cruiser :D I'm purchasing the bike to ride the piss out of it and enjoy every second of owning it. If this doesn't help ease any doubts about me being a hipster newb...I don't know what will...



Anyway...hello everyone! I'll probably keep you guys updated on my search. I've been looking on the low end of the price range for now, in case I come across a deal...but within the next couple weeks I hope to have a budget of about $1200 to pick up a decent machine.
 

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Thanks for the welcome and kind words oneworden. Would you believe I eventually decided to replace those plastics due to wearing through the bottom fairing? haha.

And HOW did I miss that listing?? I've been scouring craigslist all week... Thanks for the link, they will be receiving an email shortly...hope it's still there.
 

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Thanks for the welcome and kind words oneworden. Would you believe I eventually decided to replace those plastics due to wearing through the bottom fairing? haha.

And HOW did I miss that listing?? I've been scouring craigslist all week... Thanks for the link, they will be receiving an email shortly...hope it's still there.
 

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mate has a speed triple and loves it. musta been a hard sell. welcome in.
 

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mate has a speed triple and loves it. musta been a hard sell. welcome in.
 

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Judey really lusts after a Speed Triple...

... compromised on a T-bird instead, for the sake of a (now ex) wife.
 

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Judey really lusts after a Speed Triple...

... compromised on a T-bird instead, for the sake of a (now ex) wife.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The Triple was loads of fun...I was definitely a little broken up when I decided to get rid of it. Funny though...I actually waited til AFTER I moved to sell it; I didn't even list the bike for sale til I was already in Colorado. Left it with my parents and had my dad take care of the transaction, haha. No way I could've waved goodbye to that bike.

A little update...

I picked up the CB750F I had previously linked above. Talked the seller down more than enough for me to call it a good deal, and dropped it off at the shop. They're going to give it a once-over for me and run a compression test. Once I know where it's at, I'll bring it home and get to rebuilding whatever needs attention.
 

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your going to rebuild what ever it needs but you needed a shop to tell you what?
as always get a FACTORY service manual, easy to find free online.
post lots of pics
 

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A man has got to know his limitations. The trip to the shop makes sense if you are not 100% (or close) confident with one's diagnostic skills and / or repair skills considering we are taking about a vehicile that will be ridden in traffic at high speeds to place were you fouled be stranded. As long as the mechanic is good and honest I'd say it is worth the investment. He can then asses what tasks are things he can do (or wants to do) and what is better left to the mechanic (either because it is beyond his skills/ability or because it is something that he doesn't have time for or it is something that sucks and very un-fun).
 

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I understand taking it to the shop, but dont understand taking it to them to then do the work yourself.
I was a mechanic and always hatted when people tried to do that....im a mechanic not a teacher....
And if you are not comfortable diagnosing things then I cant see being comfortable fixing things.
 

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Well Jag - I guess this was a good post to read as I have been a little guilty as a newbie of asking my mechanic a million questions - trying to learn as much as I can in each encounter. On the one hand it is probably good to know I am probably annoying the he'll out of him. On the other 90% I have him do the work - again I know my limitations - I can barely change a light bulb and I want a nice / working bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
In all fairness, Jag, I called the shop and told them exactly what I was looking to get ahead of time: a compression test. I didn't go there and act like I wanted them to run through the bike for free and then tell me what I need to do to fix it. The service manager more than obliged, he was excited to check out the old Honda as he's a fan and loves seeing old bikes getting back on the road. The mechanic that will be looking at the bike...also a fan and owns a few older CBs.

They told me flat out that they typically don't work on those bikes there anymore, but would be more than willing to run a compression test for me...they said if anything else screamed at them to take a second look at, they would...no problem. They offered the help. I don't have a compression tester. Renting one would have cost me $20 locally. Purchasing one would have cost more (obviously). I've also never used a compression tester. And, although I'm fully capable of reading the instructions and figuring it out...why not let someone that knows what they're doing handle that?? I've come across enough posts on sohc4.com to know that I wouldn't be the first person to get inaccurate readings running a compression test if it was my first time doing it. So, when they told me they would do it for $35, why decline?

I'm a pretty competent mechanic. In fact, that YZF600r pictured above needed 2nd gear replaced...guess who tore down that engine top to bottom, overhauled the transmission, and put together a strong-running bike all by themselves? That being said, my diagnostic skills are limited to listening to or 'feeling' what isn't right on the bike, then tearing it apart to confirm the problem...or asking for advice based on those symptoms from someone with more experience. Currently, the bike runs, but not well. I described the symptoms to them as I was convinced it was an issue with fuel delivery (carbs need attention)...which they agreed with 100%. After I gave them the run-down of what was wrong, and what my suspicions were, I asked them for a compression test just to be sure it wasn't something else. They already knew my intentions were to fix the bike by myself...they even told me I could pull the carbs and they'd clean and rebuild for 1/2 the normal price for me if I didn't want to dig into them myself. Shocking, I know...but they're just a good shop and actually want to help me out.

Long story short. I plan on bringing the bike home and rebuilding the carbs. But it doesn't make sense for me to bring the bike home, and bang my head against the wall trying to fiddle with the carbs to get it running when it actually needs a top-end rebuild. Nor does it make sense for me to tear into the top end if the compression was fine in the first place.

So...the bike goes to the shop and I get a compression test. Seemed like a logical step to me.
 
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