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There is no listing because Ohlins doesn't and never has made forks for Kawasaki cruisers.

Measure from your top triple to the bottom of the tire. Find a bike with USD forks that has the same measurement. Buy the forks, wheel, rotors, calipers, upper and lower triples. Go to All Balls conversion charts and find the appropriate bearings for your conversion. Put the entire front end on your bike.
 

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"
Description
Upgrade your suspension with these Ohlins Retro 43mm Classic Superbike Forks.

Öhlins offers a 43 mm conventional universal fork for any custom builder that wants to give the bike supreme suspension yet classic style and at the same time get the familiar Öhlins Racing design. They are available in an Öhlins gold version as well as a black version.

The technology in this fully adjustable fork has been proven through the years on numerous applications and works for a range of different applications.

The fork gives the possibility to adjust spring preload as well as compression and rebound damping adjustment.

The fork bottoms come without brake caliper and fender mountings, this enables the fork to be easily adapted to various models. This is an 800mm universal fork and does not include brake caliper or fender mounting brackets."



There is no list of bikes it fits because it is a 43mm RSU universal suspension component, it fits the bike you made it fit.
 

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... I'm ordering custom triplrtree from cognito moto
To fit what sized forks and what dimension? You don't even know how wide apart they have to set yet, you don't have the wheel and brake sorted :unsure: or are you designing the bike to suit the triple tree?
 

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Cognito moto have build to suit triple trees for old bikes. They take all the work out of building your own bike. They have setups for old Honda, yamaha kawasaki BMW to fit gsxr forks. Offset to your spec. I'm sure they would be happy to make suggestions to people. Of course with any custom work you could end up with a problem like I did that they absolutely would not acknowledge. But I asked for some gullwing offset and the stem ended up being wrong length. F them...
 

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Discussion Starter #47
To fit what sized forks and what dimension? You don't even know how wide apart they have to set yet, you don't have the wheel and brake sorted :unsure: or are you designing the bike to suit the triple tree?
Would a first gen r6 front forks work there 43mm and I could use the axle and wheels for that setup? and order a custom stiple tree and stem??
 

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Now what do do with the rear end I like the looks of the double shocks but idk what could be done to keep the dual rear and get a nice wheel and tire under there
Well if the front wheel is rolling on a 120/60 ZR17 now you need to find something that would be appropriate for the rear. The stock rear tire for your donor bike is a 180/55 ZR17. My F3 runs a 120/70 ZR17 front and 180/55 ZR17 rear, pretty darn close to the same size because those combinations work well together and yes, there is no way you can shoe horn a 7 inch wide rear tire into that frame and swingarm. Houston we have a problem :|
 

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The length of modern sportbike USD forks are considerably shorter than the older bikes. That means possible clearance issues and possible geometry issues if the rear isn't lowered a similar amount.
But that doesn't stop anyone... cause thry don't give a sh!t about function.
 

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The length of modern sportbike USD forks are considerably shorter than the older bikes. That means possible clearance issues and possible geometry issues if the rear isn't lowered a similar amount.
But that doesn't stop anyone... cause thry don't give a sh!t about function.
the one he is looking at is RSU (first generation circa 1999 I think)
That part should actually work pretty good with a little effort.
Rear end and what is in the middle :/ not so much yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
The engine is great only has 8,000 miles I'm the 3rd owner but someone bored the engine out to an 810 and put gsxr carbs on it that's what the guy told me I'll put up some pics
 

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That is actually very close to what I expected.

... that crankcase breather vent filter he put on there won't work for sh*t once it is saturated in dirty oil and condensation.

Does it run?
I honestly wouldn't put a penny into suspension and brake upgrades until I seen the motor run on all 4 cylinders.

Somebody likes red, did they think that would make the ugly heavy old steel tube frame look any better?
 

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Discussion Starter #57
I guess you should have seen this reached craigslist bike but yes runs great I rode it home the day I bought it 5 hour ride home it actually runs very well I'm very surprised and yeah it was covered in dirty.
 

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I guess you should have seen this reached craigslist bike but yes runs great I rode it home the day I bought it 5 hour ride home it actually runs very well I'm very surprised and yeah it was covered in dirty.
Some things to consider when building a racer or cafe race from these tube frame big motor bikes. We have built several for vintage racing and are now in the process of putting together a pair of Suzuki GS1100E's These are going to look close to the Yosh motorbikes ridden by Graeme Crosby.

First off the frames do flex especially with the modern rubber we can use now days. You can brace the chassis but you can't get all the flex out. One thing we found is that very wide rubber is not the best way to go (we're working with 160 rears) because you overload the chassis and the frame winds up and then springs back . Feels creepy ! So what we have been trying is to use the lightest wheels (because of rules no CF) we can find. We brace the swingarms, We also are using the best 41 mm forks we could find (USD forks are NFG by rule) with fork braces and Ohlins cartridges. By the way Ohlins cartridges in the Showa forks work great (we ran them at the Isle of Man Manx GP) without any problems and they're going to cost you $1200.00 less.

We use Ohlins dual shocks because that's what Yosh used back in the day. They are not perfect and don't work quite as well as the modern single shock but then again these aren't modern motorbikes are they ? You can make the dual shocks work they take a wee bit more fussing with and you need to take care to keep records of your changes if for no other reason than it keeps you keeping your changes clear side to side.

Also remember you will never be able to lean these puppies over like you can a modern sport bike cause shit will jit the ground. We had an old Muzzy SBK here and there were all kinds of work done to the cases to allow for more clearance while leaned way over. I don't know if it was Muzzy's guys or someone else but it looked good and did allow more angle. Also looked to be a ton of effort put in to it.

So my advice. Get the weight down, stiffen the swing anr and chassis, find modern wheels, and spend your money on good fork innards,and shocks...............Then ride the hell outa the thing.

Cheers
Rich
 

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Some things to consider when building a racer or cafe race from these tube frame big motor bikes. We have built several for vintage racing and are now in the process of putting together a pair of Suzuki GS1100E's These are going to look close to the Yosh motorbikes ridden by Graeme Crosby.

First off the frames do flex especially with the modern rubber we can use now days. You can brace the chassis but you can't get all the flex out. One thing we found is that very wide rubber is not the best way to go (we're working with 160 rears) because you overload the chassis and the frame winds up and then springs back . Feels creepy ! So what we have been trying is to use the lightest wheels (because of rules no CF) we can find. We brace the swingarms, We also are using the best 41 mm forks we could find (USD forks are NFG by rule) with fork braces and Ohlins cartridges. By the way Ohlins cartridges in the Showa forks work great (we ran them at the Isle of Man Manx GP) without any problems and they're going to cost you $1200.00 less.

We use Ohlins dual shocks because that's what Yosh used back in the day. They are not perfect and don't work quite as well as the modern single shock but then again these aren't modern motorbikes are they ? You can make the dual shocks work they take a wee bit more fussing with and you need to take care to keep records of your changes if for no other reason than it keeps you keeping your changes clear side to side.

Also remember you will never be able to lean these puppies over like you can a modern sport bike cause shit will jit the ground. We had an old Muzzy SBK here and there were all kinds of work done to the cases to allow for more clearance while leaned way over. I don't know if it was Muzzy's guys or someone else but it looked good and did allow more angle. Also looked to be a ton of effort put in to it.

So my advice. Get the weight down, stiffen the swing anr and chassis, find modern wheels, and spend your money on good fork innards,and shocks...............Then ride the hell outa the thing.

Cheers
Rich
That's awesome and so true,
but sadly most of the builds that go through here are just butt candy art projects instead of race bikes, we shall see which way this one goes ;)
 

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You likely won't find a better sounding board for ideas then guys like Rich that have pounded them round the IOM. It's a place that will point out a bad idea very quickly.
 
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