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Discussion Starter #1
i started this project as a way to pass time while my other bike was being painted. the kz was sitting outside for 7 years rotting away. i decided to try to get it running the other night, surprisingly all it took was some new plugs, new gas, and a bit of starting fluid (and a battery of course). strapped for money due to the other bike, i decided to shoot for a 300 dollar build budget. so far so good.

I chopped the exhaust and upped the main jets (had jets laying around) drilled out the plugs for the pilot adjustment screws. ordered a battery and cone filters off of ebay. after the filters come in ill adjust and fine tune the carbs may possibly order new jets. battery and filters totaled $50 with shipping.

working on posting pictures now
 

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Discussion Starter #3
those old silencers are heavy and restrict a lot of air flow. plus they were in the way of where ill be mounting rearsets
 

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Discussion Starter #7
started my seat with foam from home depot for like $7 glued and stacked it then shaped it up and threw some bondo and paint on it in order to fiberglass it. also made a seat pan out of a street sign. im going to hide much of the electrical components under the cowl. also stripped the bike of its tachs and warning/neutral lights



 

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I hope the seat turns out better than it looks now. The angle of the rear portion where it follows the frame looks all wrong.

Ken
 

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all of the non conformist are all alike

Seal looks like the bike was rear ended
 

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Do you really want us to tell you what you are doing wrong? Do you care? Or is this just vanity where we are supposed to validate your project? I you you think you are being cool and all but We have all seen it before and nothing you are doing is blowing anybody's skirt up or even making your bike better.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
lol im a broke 19 year old attending college. limited tools in my shed and simply building this bike to pass time as i said. i spent all of my money building my other bike and paying for classes. im sorry im not "blowing your skirt up" tool (or why your wearing one for that matter) i simply put the bike up here so i could ask questions when the time came and maybe show some people you dont have to have bank to complete project my bad old man
 

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Young man, (I call you that because you haven't filled out your bio)
Relax. I have a personal interest in your project because I have a 440 as well, and it seems you and I are the only two here who do.
Take some time to search and read and you'll discover where you are, it's not a place for "nutmeg and cinnamon". These guys are bike builders. Slow down and ask questions and they'll get answered.

Here's how it goes-
Introduce yourself. Why are you capable of? Do you have tools? Do you know anything about bikes? etc...
Inform us on what your plans are for the bike.
Post pics of the bike. (which you've already done)

This is a place where IMPROVING bikes is paramount, not making them pretty, that comes later.
Sadly for you there isn't a lot, or at least I havent found much, "go fast" parts for these bikes. If you have building skills you can pretty much do what ever you want to it. I've seen some really nice KZ440 bikes but they are far from anything they started out as.

Things you can do-
Imporve riding position (rear sets and clip ons)
Improve braking. (You already have front disc so you're half way there)
Improve suspension (shocks, tires, etc...)

THEN you should make it pretty. Those bike are notorious for running like shit with anythign other than the stock air box. Screwing with the exhaust will only make things worse. Depending on what your plans are, and knowledge of jetting and exhaust is, you could be heading down a long road of frustration. I'm just sayin.........
 

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quote:Originally posted by overthetop
and maybe show some people you dont have to have bank to complete project my bad old man
Right here, see this quote above? In order to "show people" anything worthwhile you must first know what you are doing yourself. And it is clear that while you have a lot of spit and vinegar, you don't really even know how to show anybody anything other than what you think is cool. You wanna know what is see? I see a turd where someone is just rearranging the corn in hopes it will be mistaken for corn on the cob.

Let's start with the basics? How well does that bike run? I mean really - it sat outside for 7 years? What's the compression in each cylinder? You dumped the airbox and muffler, can you say with any certainty using one sentence that does not begin with "it feels like" that the bikes performance has improved?

Do you think your special for trying to do this for $300? Do you think you are the only one? Did you know the majority of new people here have the same unrealistic expectations that you do? You are not special, you are not the only dipshit who thinks he can do this for no money. Know why you don't know a lot more about the bikes built for $300? Because most don't get finished, and when they do nobody wants to look at them. 7 years outside? Yeah I am pretty sure you can blow your budget just on tires, chain, plugs, lube, and points just to make sure that bike is safe.

You want to ask questions, just ask. Provide enough detail and we will always answer them. You want to show anybody anything other than how little you know, you are going to have to be more scientific and thorough about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
okay well here's what i do know.did a compression test on the bike: right cylinder at 146psi left at 150psi. i warmed the bike up then used my tester and turned the engine over to get my readings. seem right so far? i dont have the service manual for this bike but im thinking the readings are pretty close to where they should be.
secondly i checked the front intake boots for any air leaks using the starting fluid trick, no spike in rpm but ill have to do it again once ive finished rebuilding my carbs because i do have a major problem there.
as i said the bike had been sitting/rotting away for years. i have cleaned it up but much of the nuts and bolts on the machine are rusted away. as i was taking apart the carburetors one of the float bowl screws snapped. i had to drill it out and re-tap it. im waiting for the new hardware (allen head floatbowl screws, bowl gasket, needle, and jets) to arrive so i can reassemble the carburetors and test for any leaks in the boot again. as for carburetor jetting, i ordered #102 for main and #68 pilot, after reading about someone who had ran pod filters and open exhaust. would these be proper jet sizes? i did read about these "bastard carbs" before getting into the project and making modifications to the slide/drilling out vacuum hole to compensate for the removal of the airbox. is it absolutely necessary? and how much larger would it have to be?

as for previous posts, i went ahead with the seat because i already had fiberglass around from board repairs and what not and was excited to get the old couch cushion of the thing just to get me motivated. i have all intentions of getting the bike running right and road worthy before making it "pretty" but i need some motivation in order to work on the clunker now
 

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$300 will not service a bike to pass an inspection....
 

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quote:Originally posted by overthetop

okay well here's what i do know.did a compression test on the bike: right cylinder at 146psi left at 150psi. i warmed the bike up then used my tester and turned the engine over to get my readings. seem right so far? i dont have the service manual for this bike but im thinking the readings are pretty close to where they should be.
Yeah that is pretty good. Typically you don't want to see anything more than a 10% difference between the cylinders. Good job (and yes I really mean that).



quote:secondly i checked the front intake boots for any air leaks using the starting fluid trick, no spike in rpm but ill have to do it again once ive finished rebuilding my carbs because i do have a major problem there.
What's the problem? pitting?


quote:as i said the bike had been sitting/rotting away for years. i have cleaned it up but much of the nuts and bolts on the machine are rusted away. as i was taking apart the carburetors one of the float bowl screws snapped. i had to drill it out and re-tap it. im waiting for the new hardware (allen head floatbowl screws, bowl gasket, needle, and jets) to arrive so i can reassemble the carburetors and test for any leaks in the boot again. as for carburetor jetting, i ordered #102 for main and #68 pilot, after reading about someone who had ran pod filters and open exhaust. would these be proper jet sizes? i did read about these "bastard carbs" before getting into the project and making modifications to the slide/drilling out vacuum hole to compensate for the removal of the airbox. is it absolutely necessary? and how much larger would it have to be?
Jetting has to do with a lot of factors, including your elevation altitude, barometric pressure, temp, etc. Just going by jetting advice off the internet is a recipe for disaster. Instead what you want to do is assemble the setup to stock specs as much as possible and then set the carbs up proper with the stock jetting sizes. Once you know the bike runs well you have established a "baseline". From there if you want to remove the mufflers and airbox jetting is a matter of small adjustments instead of wide swings to get things right. typically you won't see more than a 1 or 2 size increase on the mains, and maybe a change in the needle position, but I don't know your carbs. It used to be an old trick to drill jets when the proper size is unavailabe so I don't even trust stock jets without a measurement.


quote:
as for previous posts, i went ahead with the seat because i already had fiberglass around from board repairs and what not and was excited to get the old couch cushion of the thing just to get me motivated. i have all intentions of getting the bike running right and road worthy before making it "pretty" but i need some motivation in order to work on the clunker now
I understand the motivation thing but I think the problem is you are looking at the bike as a collection of parts instead of as a collection of systems. I also think you are trying to do to much at once for the sake of having something cool over having something that works properly.

What do I mean by systems? well the seat, bars and pegs are all one system because they are all tied together by the rider. building a seat is fine, and buying a set of bars is fine, but not doing anything about the pegs indicates you don't understand how these systems work together, at least not properly. Race and performance bike people seek optimal function first, chopper douchebags on TV seek look first and then contort themselves into funny C shapes to fit a bike that only looks good parked at the curb.

It is ok to spend more than $300. trying to stuff a bike project into a budget number is like trying to stuff 20 lbs of baloney into a 5 lb bag. at some point something is gonna give and you are gonna have a mess. It will cost what it will cost. You can always trade labor for money but it may not always be wise to do so, so projects like this are about balance and smart decisions. this is a mental challenge as much as it is a physical one.

If i were you the best way to approach this would be:

1) sort the bike out mechanically in as close to stock condition as you can make it. make sure it can pass a safety inspection and go up and down the street under its own power. It is only from this baseline that you can make a real improvement and see results. Trying to to everything at once means you may make compromises that you don't know you have made till its too late, don't let the bike make decisions for you.

2) Once it is sorted, make it lighter. Drilling is cheap. Do research on structural lightening (speed holes). Guys back in the day used to drill everything (ask me sometime about the cb750 brake arm I have that has 100 holes in it).

3) once you have distilled the bike to its barest essence, focus on what makes it perform better. brake upgrades, wheel upgrades, suspension upgrades. etc....

4) once you are past that, then look at it and if you have done everything right the bike should look like you wanted it to without making any style decisions. All it will need is paint and accents.

appraoching it in a controlled manner where you have a punch list, and small goals and big goals will help you do it for as cheap as possible. Also it will help you stay focused and enjoy the hobby as it focuses on keeping you riding as much as possible. riding is the enjoyable part, all the rest is just to enhance riding.

finally, most of us know each other in real life, which means we know our own skill levels and capabilities. We don't know you. We get a lot of 15 year olds here who inherit some pile of shit and don't know where to start, so many that we just assume every newbie is one and make it their perogative to prove to us they are not. they do this by showing they want to be part of this group and give a real introduction. hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
thankyou i appreciate the actual information lol helps a bunch.

the intake boots are old yes, but i dont actually see dry rot or signs of failure. when i first started the bike it would run on choke and sporadically jump to redline after being warmed up but if i took the choke off it would start to sputter and want to cut out. as i said i tried the starting fluid but it was almost impossible to keep a constant idle anyway. mind you the air box is uninstalled but not by choice (reason for pods). It was damaged beyond repair, cracked and full of mouse shit...at least the bike served a purpose to something. anyway, when i did manage to snap the bowl screw and remove the float bowl the gasket was near gone. i believe i was pulling air through there...

as for the systems i do understand, another reason i pulled those exhausts off as previously mentioned i will be mounting rearsets and the exhaust would have been in the way. I understand i could work on the bike in sections moving from mechanics, to electrical, to maintenance such as tires oil brakes filters etc., then cosmetics but like every kid of my generation ill blame it on A.D.D. lol...

ill admit this site is a bit intimidating, i dont know anyone. and honestly my skills dont fall in the cafe or bike building category. Ive been riding since i was 7 but on dirtbikes, quads, karts, and jetskis. My toys were never new, i was the kid with the old bikes that i would rip apart rebuild and make fast on my own and help everyone else fix their machines. and everything was two stroke!! so street and cams are all fairly new to me. apologies for coming off as a young hot head, ill put it this way i know more about bikes and mechanics than any of the kids i have ridden with, but in comparison to the guys that have been doing it twice as long or longer i have yet to scratch the surface. but i do want to learn and thats why i signed up for a forum
 
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