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Traditionally, Suzuki are the worst of the 'Big 4' for charging system problems, (generally worse than Kawasaki)
They were bad in the beginning and never really got any better. Even 2009~10 GSXR was known to catch fire because of faulty reg/rec.
They did make a few 'good ones' ( 2000 Intruder 800 R/R worked pretty well) but most are junk (and 1981 was bad year for everything except GS1000S and GS850G) .
You need an aftermarket system that can regulate properly if you don't want Lipo battery issues. Personally, I wouldn't bother and still fit good old (cheap) lead acid to my bikes
 

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Traditionally, Suzuki are the worst of the 'Big 4' for charging system problems, (generally worse than Kawasaki)
They were bad in the beginning and never really got any better. Even 2009~10 GSXR was known to catch fire because of faulty reg/rec.
...
Is this only when you convert from lead acid battery to LiPo and don't change the charging circuit ?
Or was this a disaster recall thing that affected the stock bikes fitted with a lead acid battery ?
Huge difference, if the R&R works on the stock battery it was not faulty, some idiot just put the wrong battery into it.
 

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Is this only when you convert from lead acid battery to LiPo and don't change the charging circuit ?
Unfortunately not, suzuki charging circuits are just pants.
Regulators failing is common especially on 80s 90s machines.
Not good at all. There electrical connectors also seem to be made of chocolate compared to the likes of honda they corrode and fall apart.


IMO nothing wrong with utilising modern tech on old vehicles as long as it applied correctly.

I have put some OEM LED indicators that came off a crashed 2017 triumph onto my ZRX1200R and they are blinding to the point of painfull.

They blow incandescent bulbs away in every way. WAYY! Brighter, last longer, more resistant to vibes, pull less current, more compact and look better.
 

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I know well the comparisons between modern vs traditional electronics and you missed one that does not blow away the old tech, new tech still costs twice the price.

example: I haven't had to replace a single incandescent lamp in my 1986 owned since new BMW and the batteries that average about 4 years operation only cost about 80 bucks canadian$ that's about 600$ (450$US) worth of consumable parts replaced over a span of 34 years. (One lithium battery for that bike is 360$ plus shipping) Your lithium batteries and LED lights are neever going to beat my demonstrated cost, inflation will assure to it and your lithium batteries are almost as unreliable and short lived. Worse if you subject them to heat and extreme cold, lead acid batteries blow lithium batteries away for sub-zero performance btw. Lithiums just stop working unless you build a fire under it :LOL: or tuck it under your arm pit.

Good to hear Suzuki mass produced bad electrics, too many are always saying euro bikes have bad electrics and Japanese bikes are some how perceived by some as bulletproof Nice to hear Japan can output **** product too :unsure:
 

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As mentioned Li batteries do NOT like “dirty”, unstable, high, or low charging voltages. I swapped out my VR and rectifier on my GS550 to a Polaris Razor900 reg/rec unit, and got a harness for a Bonneville to solder into my electrical harness. The details are in the build thread in my signature.....somewhere. The Polaris SH775 reg/rec is a Series type, which IMO, is even better than Mosfett.
A simplistic illustration of the differences is as follows:

Let’s say you have a bucket of water (that’s your battery). We’ll drill a hole in the bottom of it (that’s the electrical draw of the system). The bigger the hole, (the more draw or load you have) the bucket will empty faster, and the more flow of water into the bucket you will need to keep it full. Follow, so far?
Alright. You have a faucet. The more you open it, the more water comes out of it. (This is your stator. The faster you rev the engine, the more AC current/voltage it produces).
Next, we’ll attach a garden hose to the faucet to “direct” (see watt I did there?) the flow of water to the bucket. (This is your regulator/rectifier).
Now we get into the different reg/recs. The old Shunt type has been used for years. This would be like putting the hose in the bucket and just leaving it on. When the buckets full, water just overflows onto the “ground”, making a mess. The MOSFETT type would be like pointing the hose Into the bucket, but when the bucket is full, you point it directly at the ground until the bucket drains a bit, then directing it back to the bucket. The flow still goes to ground, but it doesn’t stress the bucket (I mean battery), as bad.
Now, a Series type would be like putting a sprayer attachment on the end of the hose. You stay water into the bucket until it’s full then release the trigger and the flow stops. When the bucket needs more water, you pull the trigger again.

Now, I will warn you that there are several reg/recs that look identical to the Shengdin SH775. Some of them are series types, some are MOSFETT, but some are cheap shunt types in disguise. The only one that I know for sure is a series type is the Polaris RZR 900 unit. The Mosfett ones from an R1 look the same.
 

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I know well the comparisons between modern vs traditional electronics and you missed one that does not blow away the old tech, new tech still costs twice the price.

example: I haven't had to replace a single incandescent lamp in my 1986 owned since new BMW and the batteries that average about 4 years operation only cost about 80 bucks canadian$ that's about 600$ (450$US) worth of consumable parts replaced over a span of 34 years. (One lithium battery for that bike is 360$ plus shipping) Your lithium batteries and LED lights are neever going to beat my demonstrated cost, inflation will assure to it and your lithium batteries are almost as unreliable and short lived. Worse if you subject them to heat and extreme cold, lead acid batteries blow lithium batteries away for sub-zero performance btw. Lithiums just stop working unless you build a fire under it :LOL: or tuck it under your arm pit.

Good to hear Suzuki mass produced bad electrics, too many are always saying euro bikes have bad electrics and Japanese bikes are some how perceived by some as bulletproof Nice to hear Japan can output **** product too :unsure:
100% that improved performance costs more always has.
If you're willing to accept the higher costs for all the benefits its all good.
I can't afford to have all my fasteners Ti and the benefit in weight is negligible but if folks can afford it crack on.

Cost is relative too. I looked at CMSNL and a new indicator unit for the rex was over £40 each.
Classic genuine parts are just as much as the shiny shit that performs better nowadays as theres only a finite amount of NOS left and my god it gets expensive.

A pair of OEM quality new tech for the cost of OEM quality tech from 30 years ago
 

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I recently bought a bike that had been converted to Ti fasteners, they are not all that great, I have to use lock tight and a torque wrench every time on every bolt. The guy that bought the big bucket of bolts and parts the guy took off my bike got a much better deal.

There is only one T in a MOSFET = metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor
 

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Worse if you subject them to heat and extreme cold, lead acid batteries blow lithium batteries away for sub-zero performance btw. Lithiums just stop working unless you build a fire under it :LOL: or tuck it under your arm pit.
You say that like it's a bad thing?

If it's cold enough my battery isn't going to self warm by flipping on a light or something, it's too fucking cold to ride anyway. The battery not working just gives me the excuse I need to take the Jeep with the heated seats instead.

I grew up in Minnesota, I'm not a fan of cold and have nothing to prove. If it's under 50F I'm not riding.
 

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Gota say I was lucky in that I ended my auto racing adventures with what amounted to a 3 gal can of titanium bits so I use them where I can. If I was spending my own money I guess I'd start with things that rotate (rotor bolts) and then move to the biggest stuff first, Little things like gas cap surrounds with 5 mm screws is nuts unless they're free. This said if you can get rid of weight why not.

As far as the lithium batteries I sure don't know where you are buying your spares. A good acid battery is about 25% less expensive than a lithium one and I've not had the problems with them like you fellows have. I come from Colorado and if I remember correctly Lead/acid batteries aren't exactly fond of the cold either. I do keep my lithium batteries charged (on a trickle when parked) the same as I would/do my lead acid batteries. I've got two of them that are working on 5 years and they are still doing their jobs. I do make a point of switching on the ignition before I put on my hat and gloves and get zipped up so the switch will have been on for a couple of minutes before I hit the starter but it starts so I got no complaints.

As far as the LED lights they're just better; if for no other reason than they're bright. Yeper new shit cost more and sometimes it's not better (turntables and records put out better sounds than CD's) but often it is; or it's just less hassle. It is easier to find a place to stick a LED set of tail lights than a couple of 1034 bulbs and sockets with red lenses.
 

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... This said if you can get rid of weight why not. ...
:unsure: the guy did **** to the bike like replaced the dip stick with a cork.
He ground off 2 of the 4 bolts holding the plastic rear fender on.
He removed the fuel vapour recovery tank so now the bike stinks of fuel when I park it indoors.
... lots of reasons why he should not have done some of the things he did but he's dead now so I get to live with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Update.

I remove the old regulator and the bottom part of it was burnt, so I couldn't test the alternator output with it.
A few days later my friend and I installed the new lead-acid battery along with my new regulator (Rick's MOSFET) and the results were:
-The engine running at 5,000 rpm, it was showing an average of 14.5v.
-Measuring the resistance with the engine off, it was showing an average of 0.45 ohms.
 

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Update.

I remove the old regulator and the bottom part of it was burnt, so I couldn't test the alternator output with it.
A few days later my friend and I installed the new lead-acid battery along with my new regulator (Rick's MOSFET) and the results were:
-The engine running at 5,000 rpm, it was showing an average of 14.5v.
-Measuring the resistance with the engine off, it was showing an average of 0.45 ohms.
"I remove the old regulator and the bottom part of it was burnt, so I couldn't test the alternator output with it."
You don't! You test the alternator output before the regulator!
and you measure the resistance of each coil independently.
Read the service manual again.
 

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Look it goes like this, 3 processes:
You make electricity. <- Alternator
You alter the polarity of the electricity. <- Rectifier
You limit the voltage last <- Regulator

Now you add a storage device, a battery.
 

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Look it goes like this, 3 processes:
You make electricity. <- Alternator
You alter the polarity of the electricity. <- Rectifier
You limit the voltage last <- Regulator

Now you add a storage device, a battery.
LOL, Easy my friend I had thought about trying to explain that you could run the motorbike fine on only one coil (wouldn't charge the battery but you could run the bloody thing. I wanted to say that it was a chain of events with one happening after the other. Three little pumps pushing electrons down little pipes meeting at a device that controls and modifies the electrons and goes on to fill the storage tank. Then I was reminded that all a fellow really needs to know is what needs to be tested in what order and what the values should be. Oh ! and the answers to these deep questions are in books !

I got a wee be snippy about tightening clip-on bolts but being afraid that you'd break the bolts before you got the bracket snug on the fork tube. I had to remind myself someone had to tell me about a torque wrench and a multimeter until I figured out it's in BOOKs!
 

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LOL, Easy my friend I had thought about trying to explain that you could run the motorbike fine on only one coil (wouldn't charge the battery but you could run the bloody thing. I wanted to say that it was a chain of events with one happening after the other. Three little pumps pushing electrons down little pipes meeting at a device that controls and modifies the electrons and goes on to fill the storage tank. Then I was reminded that all a fellow really needs to know is what needs to be tested in what order and what the values should be. Oh ! and the answers to these deep questions are in books !

I got a wee be snippy about tightening clip-on bolts but being afraid that you'd break the bolts before you got the bracket snug on the fork tube. I had to remind myself someone had to tell me about a torque wrench and a multimeter until I figured out it's in BOOKs!
Oh! there is that problem with the fact that those electrons keep changing directions but the tank only excepts then if they are going one way. Why confuse the issue, it's hot, it's the weekend and it's in the books anyhow.
 
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