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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
the rear fender is kinda key.... it keeps water from splashing up onto you and it holds your license plate
I was thinking of getting hints on the design from either of these 2 bikes.



Or even this one:


But I like the rims on the 1st one. Also, I might use the plate number to be a rear cover, something like this.


Again, that is if I go with the xt600.
 

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KTM does sound like a good choice, but these problems seem to scare me.
6 Negatives of Duke 390 and why it is not perfect. - RiderZone

Seems like a lot of servicing. Oh and I've read that the KTM is kinda tight? I'm not that tall, I'm around 5'11" of chinese and around 70kg fit.
Firstly, all motorcycles are a lot of servicing, or you are doing it wrong. Frequent servicing is the reason my bikes run well and last a very long time.

… now ...
That link had me doing some serious searching for additional details :/ and that was one serious long winded thread to read through btw.
Here's my take on it:



The rider describes this incident as the result of attempting to pass a lorry, and hitting a rock that was half the size of a basketball at ~80 kph
What he doesn't mention is the fact that the bike was heavily loaded and based on the above photo, being ridden 2-up. Note the 2 helmets, plus tank and saddlebags.
… If you run out of suspension travel on a motorcycle and hit a serious bump, something is going to break. And by the way, he rode out of it and did not crash.


Something else I noticed that appears in that post, as well as your most recent post, in my opinion mounting license plates, lights and fender pieces on a bracket hanging off the rear of the swingarm is a crap idea. First it puts the weight where you least want it (increases unsprung weight significantly) It will shake the crap out of your light bulbs (tires follow the road surface and not the bikes frame) and it will likely make noises that sound like the drive chain flopping around back there.

One other point to note is the rider was in contact with KTM to pursue a warranty claim. A used bike purchase does not come with a warranty.
 

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I was thinking of getting hints on the design from either of these 2 bikes.
...
Or even this one:
There is a whole lot of wrong going on there, starting with the lack of fenders, little or no air filtration and inappropriate tires.

… you seem to be attracted to very large, heavy motorcycles.

And what is with these people putting a big #1 number plate on their motorcycle ?
Wishful thinking :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Firstly, all motorcycles are a lot of servicing, or you are doing it wrong. Frequent servicing is the reason my bikes run well and last a very long time.

… now ...
That link had me doing some serious searching for additional details :/ and that was one serious long winded thread to read through btw.
Here's my take on it:



The rider describes this incident as the result of attempting to pass a lorry, and hitting a rock that was half the size of a basketball at ~80 kph
What he doesn't mention is the fact that the bike was heavily loaded and based on the above photo, being ridden 2-up. Note the 2 helmets, plus tank and saddlebags.
… If you run out of suspension travel on a motorcycle and hit a serious bump, something is going to break. And by the way, he rode out of it and did not crash.


Something else I noticed that appears in that post, as well as your most recent post, in my opinion mounting license plates, lights and fender pieces on a bracket hanging off the rear of the swingarm is a crap idea. First it puts the weight where you least want it (increases unsprung weight significantly) It will shake the crap out of your light bulbs (tires follow the road surface and not the bikes frame) and it will likely make noises that sound like the drive chain flopping around back there.

One other point to note is the rider was in contact with KTM to pursue a warranty claim. A used bike purchase does not come with a warranty.
Yeah I do realize it needs a lot of servicing, but servicing to repair problems is different from preventive maintenance, oil change, filter change and etc.

Yeah the bike was probably overloaded as well, but I did read a lot of KTM has the problem with the rim, though the rim can be changed if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
There is a whole lot of wrong going on there, starting with the lack of fenders, little or no air filtration and inappropriate tires.

… you seem to be attracted to very large, heavy motorcycles.

And what is with these people putting a big #1 number plate on their motorcycle ?
Wishful thinking :rolleyes:
The first one I would name "The Dirt Pig"
The second one is "The Leg Burner"
and the last one is called "This motorcycle operates on a mixture of gasoline, small birds, insects and stone chips"
Hahaha you have a good way of naming bikes, I have a dog that needs a good name. Maybe I'll let you name him. Hahaha And yeah I really don't like number plates but it makes bike look race-y. Hahaha I just grabe the pics of the bikes that look good in my eyes and if I go with the XT600, I'd take ideas from other bikes and put it together on the bike. Most notably the seat, and as you all have said, it needs a rear fender to keep me clean. :) If you were to redesign it, what and how would you change it?
 

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he wasn't just cracking jokes with the names. Those bikes suck. Really they do. Dirt rear tires on the front?! pure idiocy. As is the velocity stacks with the dirt tires.

And winwin you are way too concerned about looks. Ride a year and then worry about mods. REALLY. You are asking advise but not taking it - which is fine, up to you. Its just happens that peeps giving the advise have years of riding experience with multitude of bikes and you do not.
 

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Ah, crap, I wrote a really good detailed response and poof, it went into cyber-space. You'll have to wait for my reply :|



btw: what kind of dog is it and what sex ?
If it's a mix breed, I would probably call it Gangbang :| although you might be uncomfortable with yelling that out the back door, when you want him to come for supper.
 

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Ah, crap, I wrote a really good detailed response and poof, it went into cyber-space. You'll have to wait for my reply :|



btw: what kind of dog is it and what sex ?
If it's a mix breed, I would probably call it Gangbang :| although you might be uncomfortable with yelling that out the back door, when you want him to come for supper.
Or your mum calling your dog Humphrey for supper.:)
 

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I guess he needs to ask himself if he wants a good bike to ride of a POS show bike to look at while stuck on the side of the road.

Buy a stock KTM and don't mess with it, ride it and do proper maintenance, I stress watch oil level on a single they are a big crank case pump and use oil when revved.

Really with the roads i suspect you might ride there I might recommend a Suzuki DRZ400 or Honda XR650L "or smaller XRL" for a no bullshit bullet proof ride. XR650L might be a handful coming from a scooter.

A good Air Filter is needed and very cool to have in good working order.

Some people cant be helped and need to learn the hard way though.
Good Luck!
 

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Hey WinWin,
A KTM 390 is not a big single, it is kind of a medium single. I think a big single starts at 500 and goes up from there. the XT600 with a bigger piston is a big single.


Get the KTM.
 
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Discussion Starter #33
he wasn't just cracking jokes with the names. Those bikes suck. Really they do. Dirt rear tires on the front?! pure idiocy. As is the velocity stacks with the dirt tires.

And winwin you are way too concerned about looks. Ride a year and then worry about mods. REALLY. You are asking advise but not taking it - which is fine, up to you. Its just happens that peeps giving the advise have years of riding experience with multitude of bikes and you do not.
I meant no disrespect and I only posted those bikes because I like parts of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Ah, crap, I wrote a really good detailed response and poof, it went into cyber-space. You'll have to wait for my reply :|



btw: what kind of dog is it and what sex ?
If it's a mix breed, I would probably call it Gangbang :| although you might be uncomfortable with yelling that out the back door, when you want him to come for supper.
It's an american bully. Haha I appreciate your input on things.

Or your mum calling your dog Humphrey for supper.:)
Well that wouldn't be so funny for them since we're in the Philippines. But I'd be laughing and they would probably not get why. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #35 (Edited)
Ah, crap, I wrote a really good detailed response and poof, it went into cyber-space. You'll have to wait for my reply :|



btw: what kind of dog is it and what sex ?
If it's a mix breed, I would probably call it Gangbang :| although you might be uncomfortable with yelling that out the back door, when you want him to come for supper.
Or your mum calling your dog Humphrey for supper.:)
I guess he needs to ask himself if he wants a good bike to ride of a POS show bike to look at while stuck on the side of the road.

Buy a stock KTM and don't mess with it, ride it and do proper maintenance, I stress watch oil level on a single they are a big crank case pump and use oil when revved.

Really with the roads i suspect you might ride there I might recommend a Suzuki DRZ400 or Honda XR650L "or smaller XRL" for a no bullshit bullet proof ride. XR650L might be a handful coming from a scooter.

A good Air Filter is needed and very cool to have in good working order.

Some people cant be helped and need to learn the hard way though.
Good Luck!
It's not that I'm not taking your the advice you guys are giving me, I'm just considering all options, which is also why I will be visiting the local KTM showroom, I was there last month but I didn't try to ride it. I will mount it this time although I don't think they will allow test drives, even if I know the owner. DSCF6341.JPG

Also, it's not that I am putting looks first over everything else, it's just that with an older bike, you're not afraid to mod it and do stuff to it. With a new bike, you'll still baby it. Also, the KTM looks rather flashy but it looks good and modern. I'll try to mount it and see how it feels.

Hey WinWin,
A KTM 390 is not a big single, it is kind of a medium single. I think a big single starts at 500 and goes up from there. the XT600 with a bigger piston is a big single.


Get the KTM.
Yes you are right, medium single. I will visit the showroom and let you guys know.
 

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Morning :) I'll keep it short this time so I don't loose it all.
Be warey of bikes that are not new or currently licensed for the road, there is a reason they are not on the road and it is usually because it's not road worthy. They say it's being sold "as is" probably because it won't pass certification in it's current state.

I have to say, I do kind of like the look of the bike and the fact it still has some fender left is impressive. The seat :I have no idea how you could fix that and still retain the old bike supermoto look.

Price - the buyer wants the equivilent of $3688.50 canadian dollars for that bike. Sounds very high to me considering.

Front forks - are off what? You are going to need to know that before you can buy parts to service them and the left one appears to need attention already (based on the photos that appear intended to make it look good and not reveal too much detail.) Forks look like they have an anti-dive system that has been disconnected. Anti-dive does not appear on new bikes, because it was a fail. These ones have the triple trees set low on them, which makes me think they have also been modified to offer shorter travel then stock. That is a performance fail. Short travel up front, tons of off-road type travel in the rear.

It appears to have a relatively oversized front tire up front. It will test the strength of the steering head bearing, which probably consists of tiny round ball bearings. Not to say that's not what you will also find in the KTM, but those ones are much newer and therefore haven't been beat on yet. The heavier front wheel will most likely make it head-shake going over fast bumpy roads, so you are going to be wanting fork braces and steering dampeners to attempt to counter that problem, if or more likely when it happens.

Notably missing are: signals, instruments including the speedometer and a chain guard. Even if you don't care if the chain flings oil all over your clothing, the function of the front part of a chain guard is to prevent the rear tire from constantly showering the chain with dirt and water. Battery and horn, does it even have those, ignition switch might be there, but I can't see that either.

Brakes - absolutely nothing good to be said about the brakes fitted to this bike, they are marginal in every respect.

Frame - Compared to the KTM, this one is super flimsy.

I found the photo of the other side of this bike by the way and it appears to have a chian tensioner, as well as a very loose chain. I'd almost bet the sprockets are stock original and worn badly.

The footpegs are the old OEM dirtbike style footpegs, just like the ones I would replace and give away if they were fitted to a brand new bike when I bought it. Small issue since this is no longer a dirtbike, buy they won't be great for longer distance street riding.

The crankcase breather appears to have been changed to a small open to the elements air filter. Big fail in my opinion, the crankcase should breath clean, DRY air from the airbox, and goop that blows back out of that vent should drain out of the airbox from where it constantly collects. Does it even have a decent air filter and was it always run with an air filter in place, or is that why the piston needed changeing? You will never know unless he can show you the parts that came out of it. I bet he says they were perfect, but he threw them out or sold them. I would be very skeptical unless he still has them on hand to show you.

Taillights and signals need to be seen to do anything for you. Your local laws may be very lax on how many square inches of lens area is displayed and how far outboard the signals are mounted, our laws are not lax in that respect. The license plate must be illuminated by law and tucking the plate under the rear seat out of clear view will get you pulled over and hassled by the law on a regular basis. (at least in Canada it would)

The handguards serve no purpose that I can think of, other than to hide what appears to be unbreakable plastic levers. ... Myself, I hate the feel and operation of unbreakable plastic levers.

I would need to see that headlight in operation to belive it's any good and the number plate is too small to hold my 2 digit rider number, which is 51

Get your uncle to show you how to quickly inspect the wheel bearings and swingarm bushing or bearings for free-play.

I think that's about it without better photos, or a hands on inspection of the bike it's difficult to say. Buying a highly modified motorcycle without a test ride is out of the question in my opinion and there is about a 70% chance that one will handle like a turd, based only on the photos.


Riddick is a great name for a ballsy little male Bulldog ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
Morning :) I'll keep it short this time so I don't loose it all.
Be warey of bikes that are not new or currently licensed for the road, there is a reason they are not on the road and it is usually because it's not road worthy. They say it's being sold "as is" probably because it won't pass certification in it's current state.

I have to say, I do kind of like the look of the bike and the fact it still has some fender left is impressive. The seat :I have no idea how you could fix that and still retain the old bike supermoto look.

Price - the buyer wants the equivilent of $3688.50 canadian dollars for that bike. Sounds very high to me considering.

Front forks - are off what? You are going to need to know that before you can buy parts to service them and the left one appears to need attention already (based on the photos that appear intended to make it look good and not reveal too much detail.) Forks look like they have an anti-dive system that has been disconnected. Anti-dive does not appear on new bikes, because it was a fail. These ones have the triple trees set low on them, which makes me think they have also been modified to offer shorter travel then stock. That is a performance fail. Short travel up front, tons of off-road type travel in the rear.

It appears to have a relatively oversized front tire up front. It will test the strength of the steering head bearing, which probably consists of tiny round ball bearings. Not to say that's not what you will also find in the KTM, but those ones are much newer and therefore haven't been beat on yet. The heavier front wheel will most likely make it head-shake going over fast bumpy roads, so you are going to be wanting fork braces and steering dampeners to attempt to counter that problem, if or more likely when it happens.

Notably missing are: signals, instruments including the speedometer and a chain guard. Even if you don't care if the chain flings oil all over your clothing, the function of the front part of a chain guard is to prevent the rear tire from constantly showering the chain with dirt and water. Battery and horn, does it even have those, ignition switch might be there, but I can't see that either.

Brakes - absolutely nothing good to be said about the brakes fitted to this bike, they are marginal in every respect.

Frame - Compared to the KTM, this one is super flimsy.

I found the photo of the other side of this bike by the way and it appears to have a chian tensioner, as well as a very loose chain. I'd almost bet the sprockets are stock original and worn badly.

The footpegs are the old OEM dirtbike style footpegs, just like the ones I would replace and give away if they were fitted to a brand new bike when I bought it. Small issue since this is no longer a dirtbike, buy they won't be great for longer distance street riding.

The crankcase breather appears to have been changed to a small open to the elements air filter. Big fail in my opinion, the crankcase should breath clean, DRY air from the airbox, and goop that blows back out of that vent should drain out of the airbox from where it constantly collects. Does it even have a decent air filter and was it always run with an air filter in place, or is that why the piston needed changeing? You will never know unless he can show you the parts that came out of it. I bet he says they were perfect, but he threw them out or sold them. I would be very skeptical unless he still has them on hand to show you.

Taillights and signals need to be seen to do anything for you. Your local laws may be very lax on how many square inches of lens area is displayed and how far outboard the signals are mounted, our laws are not lax in that respect. The license plate must be illuminated by law and tucking the plate under the rear seat out of clear view will get you pulled over and hassled by the law on a regular basis. (at least in Canada it would)

The handguards serve no purpose that I can think of, other than to hide what appears to be unbreakable plastic levers. ... Myself, I hate the feel and operation of unbreakable plastic levers.

I would need to see that headlight in operation to belive it's any good and the number plate is too small to hold my 2 digit rider number, which is 51

Get your uncle to show you how to quickly inspect the wheel bearings and swingarm bushing or bearings for free-play.

I think that's about it without better photos, or a hands on inspection of the bike it's difficult to say. Buying a highly modified motorcycle without a test ride is out of the question in my opinion and there is about a 70% chance that one will handle like a turd, based only on the photos.


Riddick is a great name for a ballsy little male Bulldog ;)
Wow, this is really really really really really helpful! Thanks a lot! I will check the points that you have made. I'll try to be in Cebu to check the bike so I can check everything you mentioned. Also, I will show this reply to my uncle so he can tell me some stuff about it as well. With regards to papers, this bike has papers, it will need to be transferred and made electronic like the rest of the old bikes upon transfer of ownership. Also, it does need a signal light and a rear fender, but he was able to travel and cross islands with the bike before, I think most checkpoints at rural areas are only interested in your registration and license?


Oh and with regards to price, people here sell for high prices even older models. I see prices in the US or other places of bikes of the same model and year, in better condition, and the price is like 1/2-1/4 of what it is selling for around here. :(
 

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:cool: helpful is good.


Up here, anytime a vehicle transfers ownership, or the license plates have lapsed for any length of time at all, the vehicle requires a fitness inspection and certificate from a licensed mechanic. Once you have it on the road and keep it continuously licensed (which requires annual proof of insurance) the vehicle will never need another mechanical certification, so you can get away with modifying it. The police will be the only ones to question the vehicles fitness on the road after that.

What he got away with would have no bearing on what you would get away with when you go to plate it.

Insurance companies up here would also have a field day with your rates and claims, if they knew the bike had been modified.
Insurance rates for a bike like that up here would typically be somewhere between 600 and 1600$ annually without collision coverage, and assuming you had a near perfect driving record.
Always check with your insurance underwriter before purchasing a motorcycle, the rates vary widely between different models and lots of silly reasons can be given to justify higher rates, engine displacement being one.

I can only imagine it's a totally different world where you live. ;) to start with, you guys don't get snow for 3 months of the year and get ripped off for all that motorcycle insurance down-time like we do.
 
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