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I asked about this a while ago and received little response. So i am trying again, with pictures.

I am ready to mount the rearsets and want to get the forums opinions. I don't have any mounting brackets. I planned to have some steel bars welded to the passenger peg triangle and then drill a hole for the peg post. The material needs to be 1/2 inch to 9/16ths thick.

This is my basic idea:


I was thinking that i would turn the current brake lever to point strait up from its mount. I would cut it off and drill it so I can connect the throw rod from the rearset to the make shift lever on the current brake post.

I know some people bend the rear brake rod to route around the swing arm and connect right to the rearset. I like that idea but it seems the swing arm could get in the way. As well, I'm not sure if i need a spring to return the rearset pedal to the brake off position??

Another question is, how far out do i mount the peg? If i want it to line up like below then I need to mount the peg far out. It seems that it would look odd to have the rearset peg sticking way out.



Is it a problem to have the throw arms at an angle as opposed to straight on?



I would like the rearset peg mounted flush to the frame. I would also like the least cumbersome way to activate the brake?

I am open to all ideas. Do you have any?
 

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thats pretty far back. would you be interested in buying some brackets for the cb750 where you use a CB400F rear brake arm (the long rod with clevis on end that runs from the rear brake to the actuator assembly inside near the swingarm mount)?

The are bolt on and you just mount your own pegs and levers to them.
email me at [email protected] if you want some more info. they put the pegs more toward the inner corner of that triangle.

'72 cb750
'75 cb750
'76cb750
'82 cx500 (but mine is cool, i swear. Why don't you believe me?)
 

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the springs in the brake will pull it back. youl probably need to fab a stop of some kind. why g forward then back. seems silly. but im not a 750 guy.

jc

i dont know shit
 

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quote:I asked about this a while ago and received little response. So i am trying again, with pictures.
MUT, I like what you are trying to do with your CB750 I will try to answer your questions, but you need to know that it is really hard to reply to an inquiry when it asked the way you did -- As a general rule of thumb, folks usually only have the capacity to respond to one question at a time.... this happens to me all the time with my work. I send an email with two or three questions, universally I only get one of them answered. So next time, if you want a good answer to your good questions, try to organize it a little better, OK?
quote:1. I planned to have some steel bars welded to the passenger peg triangle and then drill a hole for the peg post. The material needs to be 1/2 inch to 9/16ths thick.
That sounds fine. I think that 1/4" would be more than thick enough. Take a look at your engine mounting brackets. They are pretty thin. There is no need to go crazy with these things!

quote:2. I was thinking that i would turn the current brake lever to point strait up from its mount. I would cut it off and drill it so I can connect the throw rod from the rearset to the make shift lever on the current brake post.
That would be a fine idea. It might look a little bulky, but I am sure it would work just fine. What you described is more or less the standard mount for these things. Personally, I would make or find a similar bracket that is smaller and lower profile -- this is only because I think that big, fat brake lever would look silly hacked and drilled. Some old bikes have just the thing you want. Consider this the stock brake lever from my 1970 Suzuki T350. This is an old photo from when I was makingmy own rearsets:


quote:3a. I know some people bend the rear brake rod to route around the swing arm and connect right to the rearset.
This is a BAD IDEA! When the swing arm moves it will articulate the brake. Don't do it.

quote:3b. I like that idea but it seems the swing arm could get in the way. As well, I'm not sure if i need a spring to return the rearset pedal to the brake off position??
This is true, but you don't want to do it that way anyway. The spring in the drum will help return things, but it is too critical of a system to risk having the rear wheel lock up on you because the spring was not doing its job. This applies double to the "route the brake arm directly from the brake drum to the foot lever idea."

quote:4. Another question is, how far out do i mount the peg? If i want it to line up like below then I need to mount the peg far out. It seems that it would look odd to have the rearset peg sticking way out.
This is totally up to you. The purpose of rear sets is two fold: To raise the feet so they don't drag in the turns, and to improve the comfort of your riding position whilst using lower handlebars. Oh, and so you can look cool too. Forget about what it will look like. Think about your body, your motorcycle, and your riding style, and then put the foot rests in the best place for you. The way that works best for you is the way that will be best for you. It would suck to go through all the effort to make it look cool, but then have the bike be uncomfortable for you at the track or on a long trip. For example, I know a guy who successfully races BMW bikes. He has clip-on handlebars but does not like rearsets. This is his preference from years of racing. He says, "the stock foot position is so much more comfortable -- after a day at the track I still feel good, but with rear sets I could hardly walk! I know the routine: when hitting a turn my foot touches first, then my knee sliders... and then my helmet." Some people were giving him a little slack on some other forum about not riding with rearsets, but they didn't know he was a racer. Either way, who cares what people think. You need to decide what is important to you, and stick with that. Maybe you are a 7' Gorilla, or maybe you are a midget -- both riders will set up their bikes differently.

quote:5. Is it a problem to have the throw arms at an angle as opposed to straight on?
No, it is not. The only possible disadvantage is if the arm is so bent that it bends like a spring at the bends, reducing the efficiency of the brake. Most bikes I have built have had to have some bends in the arm, and have done so with absolutely no adverse effects.

quote:6. I would like the rearset peg mounted flush to the frame. I would also like the least cumbersome way to activate the brake?
OK, then do that. If it is logistically very difficult, then go back to school, or do it some other way. Its your bike, do it the way that you want it done.

quote:7. I am open to all ideas. Do you have any?
Don't sweat the small stuff. Take the time to mock things up to test fit for comfort before you cut and weld, and you will be a happy man. However, if you just do the "cool" thing because some tard on the Internets said it would look cool, then you will cry... like a little girl.

Peace and grease
-fang

'70 Suzuki T350
Download The Fang.mp3 HERE


Edited by - fang on Feb 06 2008 3:09:08 PM
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Fang,
Thanks for the response. I understand the issue with too many questions rolled into my posts. My wife was asking me if I was writing a novel last night.

Becasue I am new to this I has so many questions. I try to search prior posts to answer many of them.

I do appreciate you taking the time to repond. You, and a few others, have given me some good guidance.

I never even thought to look at other older rear brake setups to see if I could accomplish what I wanted. I like the picture you sent. I'll be measuring and looking for something similar. I don't like the idea of having the original bulky brake arm all chopped up, but it could work.

Thanks again.
 

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fang, good answers, youve solved a problem i had with contecting the back brake up without bending the brake rod that goes to the back cause that in my mind wasnt a good idea. bending things that will then be pulled and put under strain surely would affect your braking power and it wouldnt have as much bite.

but my one question to you is about the suzi t350 brake arm, would that fit a cb400. are the mountings for the brake the same as the one in the pics or not.

cheers lad
 
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